Cat Peeing on Furniture?

Peeing on rugs, carpets, furniture, or counters is one of the most frustrating problems cat owners may run into. But dont just randomly try every piece of advice. Change is very stressful to a cat, and added stress could make the problem worse. Instead, try to figure out why he is not reliably using the litter box.

Even if she is still using the box each day, and even if the puddles are small, sudden daily accidents in different places in your home are a sign that she might not be able to control her bladder. Cats like to pee near or in their core territory the part of the house they spend their time.

And dont fill a box really deep so that you can just scoop daily and not need to add litter until the weekend. Change is not fun for cats, so that nice, thick carpet that is always the same could start looking pretty irresistible. I also recommend scheduling a consultation if the cat is leaving small puddles in more than two places, or peeing on walls, baseboards, doors, sides of chairs, or other vertical surfaces.

How do you get a cat to stop peeing on furniture?

Sticky tape can discourage a cat from urinating on a piece of furniture because the sensation of the tape on their paws is unpleasant. Try applying double sided sticky tape to the edges of furniture as well as over the spot where your cat likes to urinate. Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleaner.

Why is my cat peeing on the couch all of a sudden?

Your cat peeing on the bed or couch is a sign of a medical problem. … Many serious medical problems can cause cats to avoid using litter boxes. A short list includes urinary tract infections, diabetes and arthritis, as well as a host of other painful and serious conditions.

Why are my cats peeing on my furniture?

Some of the medical issues that might stop your cat from using his litter box include conditions that affect a cat’s attempts to urinate, such as bladder stones, urinary tract infections, or even arthritis.

Do cats pee on things out of spite?

Cats begin urinating outside the box as a response to something that is wrong, either with them or their environment. It is not just them “behaving badly” and cats don’t urinate inappropriately out of “spite”. … Some cats can also have microscopic crystals in their bladders that can cause irritation.

There is a place and a function for everything. While litter boxes function as feline restrooms, sofas and beds are supposed to be for relaxing, sleeping and (if were lucky) cuddling cats. We expect to find cat urine in the litter boxes, not where we unwind and nap. But what about a cat peeing on the bed or couch?

Look for Clues

Peeing on rugs, carpets, furniture, or counters is one of the most frustrating problems cat owners may run into. But don’t just randomly try every piece of advice. Change is very stressful to a cat, and added stress could make the problem worse. Instead, try to figure out why he is not reliably using the litter box.One clue is whether it is a small or large pool of urine. Large would be about a ¼ cup or more. Is it in many different places, or in just one or two spots? Are any walls, baseboards, or sides of furniture being soiled, or is it always a horizontal puddle? If it is always a puddle, is it pretty much a circle of pee, or is it more of a long, thin oval? How often does this happen? Did this happen suddenly?

Keep a Daily Log

The best thing to do is keep a log of what is going on. Note when and where this happens, including time of day and anything that happened beforehand, especially in the days before the first incident. This could help you solve the mystery. And it will surely save you money if you need to hire a cat behavior consultant. Your consultant can minimize the time it takes to solve this problem if you have good information for her to work with.

Is it Medical?

If your cat had been using the litter box regularly and all of sudden is emptying her bladder in many locations every day, take her right to the veterinarian! Even if she is still using the box each day, and even if the puddles are small, sudden daily accidents in different places in your home are a sign that she might not be able to control her bladder. This indicates a health problem.

Is the Litter Box Clean?

But what if it is just time to time, and the puddles are large and circular in one or two places? And what if sometimes those puddles are near the box? That is a clue that there is something about the box the cat finds unworkable. Is it clean enough? It’s an easy, stress-free experiment to scoop more often, but don’t go crazy with scrubbing the box. It’s the clumps and solid waste more so than the pee smell that will put a cat off.Cats do not like the smell of detergent and soap. If you need to wash the box, use mild soap in very small quantities and rinse the box very well. Once a month is usually plenty of washing. Sometimes less is needed, especially if you spot clean in between. And it’s best to have at least two boxes for several reasons. One reason is so the newly washed box can have several hours to air out. But the main thing to do is scoop at least daily.

Is the Litter Box the Right Size?

Another cause of puddles of pee outside the box each week could be the box size. The box should be 1.5 times as long as your cat. So, if your cat measures 1 foot from the base of the neck to the base of the tail, his litter box should be 18 inches long. If he is any longer, he needs a longer box. Because most boxes are only 18 inches long, you will need an extra-large or a jumbo for many cats. A cement mixing tray works well for big cats. If you got your cat as a kitten, he very well could have outgrown his box by the time he is 1 or 2 years old.Another box feature that puts off many cats is a hooded box. Cats like to see who may be coming, and like to have two escape routes from the box. This is why a box in an alcove or recess is often rejected by the cat as well. He may use it once in a while because he likes to dig, but at times he may choose the dining room rug, where he has a clear view.

Is it the Litter?

It could be the litter is not to your cat’s liking. But don’t just dump new litter in his box! That is way too stressful. Instead, offer a second box with the new litter near an existing box. I recommend a dust-free litter. If this does not work, you could try Cat Attract litter. However, if you have a multi-cat household all the cats will likely gravitate to that one box – and Cat Attract is expensive. So instead, I would first try adding a cup or so of Cat Attract litter to a second box along with dust-free litter.

Is it a Multi-cat Household?

Speaking of multi-cat households, it is important to have one more box than you have cats, and these boxes must be in different locations. Three boxes in the basement is really just one big box, especially if they are side-by-side. Many cats do not like to share a litter box room. Even if you just have one cat, you may need two boxes – some cats like one for pee and one for poop.

Is it Litter Depth?

Another consideration is litter depth. Again, do not just change the depth! Offer a new box with a different depth near a box he uses. Some cats prefer very shallow litter. Keep a log for at least a week and see if he uses one box more than another. And don’t fill a box really deep so that you can just scoop daily and not need to add litter until the weekend. Change is not fun for cats, so that nice, thick carpet that is always the same could start looking pretty irresistible.

Inappropriate urination might signal relationship issues

Mild as well as serious disputes with the other resident animals can cause issues like a cat peeing on the bed, couch or other inappropriate places. Cat fights often occur over status, territory and resources, and can occur when other animals are introduced too quickly into the household. Dogs can be a source of stress as well — some are serious threats, others chase or play too rough. The end result is often the same — a cat peeing on the bed, couch or other areas with good views that she can quickly vacate.The situation needs to be evaluated — new cats should be separated and reintroduced gradually to the other resident animals. Most likely you will have to add more vertical territory — cat trees, shelves and other tall pieces of furniture that the cats can use.One way kitties show their status is by where they sit in relationship to each other. These high places are also refuges from dogs and other threats. They should be at least five feet high. In addition to vertical territory, add scratching posts and horizontal scratchers. One way cats mark their territory is by scratching.

Your cat might have separation anxiety

Kitties are not socially solitary — they often form close attachments with people and other animals. Sensitive kitties can become anxious when their favorite person is away from them for an extended period of time. These cats might respond to the absence by peeing on the bed or the couch that is saturated with their human’s scent. They’re mingling their own scents with that of their beloved.Although separation anxiety can be heartbreaking, there are steps you can take that will help your cat feel more secure when left alone. These include enlisting someone to either stay with your cat or visit at least twice a day. During their visits they should interact with her, doing activities she enjoys, such as play and maybe grooming. Your scent can help your kitty feel like she hasn’t been abandoned. Before leaving, place small towels and other articles of clothing that have your scent on them in sealable plastic bags — one for each day you’ll be away. Your cat sitter needs to put one new scented item out every day for your cat.