Can You Own a Monkey?

In the absence of a federal law on the subject of simian sidekicks, state laws prevail. So whether it is legal or illegal to have monkeys as pets depends on where you want to engage in monkey-keeping. If you live in California, you may be out of luck.

They are California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont and Wyoming. Oregon, Idaho, South Dakota, Oklahoma, Michigan and Delaware allow monkeys, but you must apply to the their divisions of wildlife to obtain permits, which may or may not be granted.

Laws are constantly changing; it’s important you always check with your state authorities prior to seriously considering obtaining a monkey as a pet.

What states is it legal to have a pet monkey?

Pet Monkeys Allowed. Currently, Washington state, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio, Alabama, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina have no restrictions on keeping monkeys as pets.

Can you have a monkey as a house pet?

Overall, monkeys are not good pets. Yes, some can be quite sweet for a time. But the reality is monkeys are capable of causing too much harm and need too much care and attention to thrive in a human household. … In short, non-human primates and human beings make poor housemates.

How much is a pet monkey?

Pet monkeys typically cost between $4,000 and $8,000 each. However, this will depend on the monkey’s age, rarity and temperament. Younger, more rare and friendlier monkeys tend to cost more.

Can you buy and own a monkey?

Only zoos and scientists can keep monkeys in California. … The Department of Fish and Wildlife considers primates – including monkeys and chimpanzees — both an undesirable menace to native California wildlife and agriculture, and a threat to public health and safety.

There is something irresistible about an infant monkey. Many baby monkeys, such as capuchins, appear so sweet and helpless and seem like human infants. However, those sweet babies grow up into difficult adult monkeys and do not make good pets.

A pet monkey deprived of your time and attention will likely develop not only severe behavioral problems, such as screaming and biting, but also psychological issues that can be difficult to remedy. Sometimes permit holders are subject to home inspections to ensure proper facilities and care are being provided.

Some states require certain types of enclosures to fulfill permit regulations , but you should always have a place to secure your monkey to keep it and the public safe.

Primates should not be considered as pets in the accepted sense of the word. They are wild undomesticated animals that cannot be house-trained or fully tamed.

Primates need space, companions and mental stimulation – not what you find in someone’s living room. Monkeys like marmosets also scent mark extensively, spreading their musky smell everywhere.

Metabolic bone disease (rickets) is a common, debilitating and painful, health problem in pet primates caused by poor diet and lack of UV light. Primates must be reared by their mothers – removing them too early in attempt to ‘tame’ them causes extreme suffering.

Have you ever wondered whether owning an exotic monkey or perhaps a tiger was legal? Is there a little bear cub youve dreamt of having ever since you were young?

Concerns of public safety due to disease outbreaks or physical attacks can be also real issues when owning these exotic creatures. Moreover, reported incidents of poor living conditions, malnutrition, and neglect are not uncommon.

Wild cats Reptiles Dangerous carnivores Exotic monkeys or non-human primates Among the states with the most lax exotic animal laws are Alabama, Nevada, North & South Carolina, and Wisconsin. These states have no explicit laws banning ownership of these types of animals but may have secondary import or health rules.

Some states allow private ownership of exotic animals based on a permit or licensure scheme. Permits help regulate exotic pets and provide a degree of safety to the general public. State agencies issue permits to qualified applicants before they can acquire exotic animals.

Applicants will typically be required to submit various documents indicating specific details of the animal. Under a permit scheme, states will have specific legislation detailing the legalities of exotic pet ownership. For instance, legal pets in Georgia, such as the sugar glider or the European ferret, do not require a permit.

Even for a restrictive state like Illinois, exotic animals are allowed based on a registration and permitting scheme. The rules and regulations for keeping exotic animals as pets vary vastly among the differing states. Examples of large cats include lions, tigers, cheetahs, leopards, lynx, and jaguars.

There are 35 states that ban cats as pets, however, exemptions and local regulations may allow for ownership with a permit. While its true bears can develop affection for their caregivers, they are still undeniably dangerous to keep as pets. A sudden change in mood or a startling event can turn a friendly bear into a lethal animal.

Alabama Delaware Idaho Indiana Mississippi Missouri Nevada North Carolina North Dakota Oklahoma Pennsylvania South Carolina South Dakota Texas Wisconsin Venomous reptiles, such as cobras, twig snakes, and mambas, are also illegal in many states. Even restrictive states with comprehensive exotic animal bans, like California and Hawaii, allow private ownership of certain birds.

Certain native wild birds, such as raptors or geese, typically require permits to keep. The rules for owning camels, llamas, and alpacas are relatively lenient in most states.

Pet Monkeys Allowed

As of 2012, 17 states have no restrictions against residents practicing the fine art of monkey-keeping. However, efforts by pro-animal groups and others are ongoing to have more states enact legislation banning monkeys as pets. Currently, Washington state, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio, Alabama, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina have no restrictions on keeping monkeys as pets. However, in 2012, legislation was pending to restrict monkey-keeping in Washington state, North Carolina and South Carolina.

Partial Pet Monkey Bans

Some states have not fully banned monkeys as pets. These states have some kind of law or restriction to which those who would like to keep monkeys as pets must adhere. As of this 2012 writing, Arizona, Indiana, Mississippi and Tennessee all have partial bans on monkey possession. These bans make it illegal to own apes, but not monkeys. Tennesseans may have any kind of monkey except for a baboon, and apes are not allowed. In Arizona, all monkeys are allowed but apes are not. In Indiana, you can have monkeys and great apes but must have a permit for the apes. Mississippi allows all monkeys except baboons and macaques, and bans all kinds of apes. Florida and Texas allow some types of monkeys but prohibit others. These laws are evolutionary, so check your own state’s statutes if you are considering getting a monkey as a pet.

No Monkeys Allowed

In 2012, 19 states had outright bans on private monkey ownership. They are California, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont and Wyoming. If you live in one of these states and have your heart set on a monkey friend, you may have to think about moving.

Restrictions May Apply

Some states allow monkeys as pets but have restrictions on the kinds of monkey you can have, the manner of keeping, and the types of permits and insurance you must keep current in order to be in compliance with current laws. Oregon, Idaho, South Dakota, Oklahoma, Michigan and Delaware allow monkeys, but you must apply to the their divisions of wildlife to obtain permits, which may or may not be granted. In Hawaii, you can have a monkey as long as you are fully bonded. Laws are constantly changing; it’s important you always check with your state authorities prior to seriously considering obtaining a monkey as a pet.

The Challenges of Raising a Monkey

Taking on a pet monkey is not like caring for most other pets. A well-cared-for monkey can generally live to be anywhere from 20 to 40 years old, and it will need your full commitment throughout its entire life. Monkeys do not grow up and mature like human children do. They are, in essence, permanent toddlers.Pet monkeys also might not take well to new people in your life, including spouses and children, and they make it hard to get away for vacations. Plus, finding a new home for a pet monkey is extremely difficult and psychologically hard on the monkey.Furthermore, a monkey needs a large amount of social interaction. A pet monkey deprived of your time and attention will likely develop not only severe behavioral problems, such as screaming and biting, but also psychological issues that can be difficult to remedy.

Legal Issues

Primates, such as monkeys, might be illegal to keep as pets where you live. And if a monkey is legal to own, permits still might be required. Sometimes permit holders are subject to home inspections to ensure proper facilities and care are being provided.Moreover, homeowner policies might require additional liability coverage, or some insurance companies might cancel your policy altogether if they find out you have a monkey. However, not having insurance puts you at risk if your monkey bites someone.

Medical Issues

A wide range of diseases can be passed between monkeys and humans. (These are called zoonotic diseases and can be quite serious.) But finding a veterinarian near you who is able and willing to treat a primate can be challenging.In addition, it can be difficult to keep a captive monkey healthy. For instance, monkeys often require specialized diets that can be expensive and time-consuming to prepare. Diabetes is common in pet monkeys due to the poor diets many owners feed them. This is just one disease that requires constant monitoring by you and your vet.

Behavioral Problems

A sweet, dependent baby monkey will eventually grow up to become the wild animal it was meant to be. Raising a monkey around humans won’t change its wild nature, and pet monkeys will never truly become domesticated. In fact, depriving a pet monkey of normal social relationships with other monkeys can create behavioral problems and neuroses.Pet monkeys often have a tendency to bite (and they have 32 teeth to deliver these nasty bites). While some monkeys are gentle, some are very aggressive. However, even the gentlest monkeys are unpredictable and might turn aggressive on anyone, including the person to whom they are the closest, especially during and after puberty.

Housing Pet Monkeys

Monkeys need a large, secure enclosure, which can be expensive to construct. They should spend time outdoors if possible. And they must be provided with a wide variety of ever-changing toys and exercise equipment to keep them challenged, or they will suffer from boredom. Some states require certain types of enclosures to fulfill permit regulations, but you should always have a place to secure your monkey to keep it and the public safe.Moreover, monkeys are not clean and tidy. Most can‘t be effectively toilet trained. Many young monkeys can be diapered or at least partly toilet trained, but that ability is often lost at maturity. Plus, they might engage in distasteful activities involving their feces and urine (such as throwing it and painting with it). Aside from the toileting messes, pet monkeys also can be extremely mischievous and destructive, especially when they’re bored.

Potentially dangerous pets

Code of Practice for the Welfare of Privately Kept Non-Human Primates, DEFRA 2009

Not house pets

Primates need space, companions and mental stimulation – not what you find in someone’s living room. Monkeys like marmosets also scent mark extensively, spreading their musky smell everywhere.

Specialist diet

Metabolic bone disease (rickets) is a common, debilitating and painful, health problem in pet primates caused by poor diet and lack of UV light. Primates have specialised diets – contrary to what breeders may say.

Health problems

Primates need specialist vets that can expensive and hard to find. Primates can spread disease to humans such as

Companionship

Primates must be reared by their mothers – removing them too early in attempt to ‘tame’ them causes extreme suffering.