Can You Eat Banana Peels?

In fact, banana peels are not only edible but also rich in several key nutrients, including potassium, dietary fiber, polyunsaturated fats, and essential amino acids (

In fact, banana peels are not only edible but also rich in several key nutrients, including potassium , dietary fiber, polyunsaturated fats, and essential amino acids ( 1 ). Meanwhile, potassium can help regulate blood pressure levels, protect against bone loss, and reduce your risk of kidney stones ( 3 ).

Some research suggests that antioxidants can reduce inflammation and protect against chronic conditions, such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes ( 5 ). Pesticide exposure has been linked to several adverse effects on health and may increase the risk of conditions like autism, cancer, high blood pressure, diabetes, and dementia ( 7 ). In this case, choosing ripe bananas and cooking them thoroughly can help improve the taste and texture, making them a bit more appetizing.

Cooked banana peels make a great substitute for bacon or pulled pork in your favorite meatless recipes. They can not only help prevent food waste but also supply a range of important nutrients, including fiber, potassium, and antioxidants.

Why do we not eat banana peels?

However, bananas themselves are already good sources of those nutrients, so it’s not necessary to eat the peel as well, although it’s safe to do so. Eating banana peels can expose you to contaminants or pesticides, so it’s important to scrub them carefully if you happen to like the taste and texture.

Is banana peels healthy to eat?

Banana peels are packed with polyphenols, carotenoids, and other antioxidants that fight cancer-causing free radicals in your body. Eating more banana peels, especially green, unripe peels, can increase your antioxidant levels and help reduce your risk of cancer.

Can banana peels hurt you?

Technically, banana peels are safe to consume, even with pesticide residue. In the American diet, banana peels are usually thought to be inedible. … Although some will stick to the idea that you should not be eating banana peels, the fact is that these bad boys won’t kill you.

If you live in the US, you‘re probably used to tossing banana peels in the trash. But people in other countries, including India, have been taking advantage of their nutritional benefits for decades.

Heat breaks down the skin’s fiber and loosens up that tough texture, making the peel easier to chew and digest. At the same time, other hormones break down the green pigments in the peel, turning them yellow and eventually brown.

12% of your daily fiber, which helps with digestion and may help lower your risk of diabetes 17% of your vitamin C, which is important for your immune system as well as growth and development 20% of your vitamin B-6, which aids the body’s ability to convert food into energy 12% of your potassium, which helps in development of cells, tissues, and organs throughout the body 8% of your magnesium, which is important for the body’s energy productions and regulating glucose and blood pressure levels If you can‘t stomach the thought of eating a banana peel, then consider some of the many other ways you can reuse this valuable product of nature.

– An Australian nutritionist claims that eating banana peels can boost your intake of fiber and important nutrients like vitamin C, potassium, and magnesium.

Most recently, the topic got attention when Australian nutritionist Susie Burrell wrote a blog post lauding the benefits of eating banana skins. Burrell wrote peels are full of nutrients, but it’s just as easy to get those by snacking on bananas themselves, according to Megan Meyer , a nutritional immunologist with the International Food Information Council.

Dietary fiber is linked to feeling fuller with fewer calories, which may help with weight loss . Meyer recommended rinsing and scrubbing bananas (and any produce) if you‘re going to eat the skin, to remove dirt, bacteria, and other unwanted ingredients , even though conventional bananas grown with pesticides and other additives are well within the safe limits set by the USDA and other organizations.

Bananas are sweet, soft fruits popular all over the world. Their thick, fibrous peels, however, are a less popular source of nutrition, at least in Western countries. But contrary to what many people believe, banana peels are not only safe to eat, they also offer a number of health benefits.

This can be a particularly important benefit of banana peels for people with or irritable bowel syndrome . Banana peels are packed with polyphenols, carotenoids, and other antioxidants that fight cancer-causing free radicals in your body.

Further research is needed to understand whether banana peels can lower cancer risk in people. Continued The exact composition of banana peels is still being investigated, so theres no standard nutrition profile yet. A number of factors affect the nutrients found specifically in banana peels.

United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service: “Apples and oranges are America’s top fruit choices.” Journal of Functional Foods : “Phenolic compounds within banana peel and their potential uses: A review.” Food Science and Technology Research : Differences in Biological Response Modifier-like Activities According to the Strain and Maturity of Bananas.

Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology : Antioxidant activity and protective effect of banana peel against oxidative hemolysis of human erythrocyte at different stages of ripening.

Nutritional benefits

The sweet flesh of a medium-sized banana contains significant percentages of your daily recommended intake of various nutrients, such as:If you then eat the skin along with the flesh you get an even bigger boost in these same nutrients:”[The skin] contains high amounts of vitamin B6 and B12, as well as magnesium and potassium. It also contains some fiber and protein,” San Diego-based nutritionist Laura Flores told LiveScience.Eating the peel is not only good for your body but also better for the environment.In 2013, bananas were America’s most popular fresh fruit. The average American ate 11.4 pounds of bananas over the course of that year.Since a medium-sized banana weighs about 0.3 pounds, that equates to about 38 bananas per person, or roughly 12 billion for the whole US. And since most of us toss the peel, that also means a lot of organic waste. Most of this waste goes to landfills, but some of it is used as fertilizer, in water purification, and in composting.

Health Benefits

Both bananas and banana peels may offer different health benefits depending on their level of ripeness. Underripe, green bananas may be more effective in treating digestive issues, while riper, blackened bananas have been shown to help white blood cells fight off disease and infection.Keep in mind that many of these studies were done on rats, not humans, and further research is needed to determine if bananas have the same effects on humans.Here are a few potential health benefits of banana peels:
The high levels of tryptophan in bananas, combined with the B6 in banana peels, can help relieve some symptoms of depression and other mood disorders. Tryptophan turns into serotonin as it breaks down, which can improve your mood. Vitamin B6 can help improve sleep, which has a positive impact on mood over time.
Fiber-rich banana peels can help regulate the digestive system, easing both constipation and diarrhea. This can be a particularly important benefit of banana peels for people with Crohn’s disease or irritable bowel syndrome.
Vitamin A can help keep your eyes strong and healthy. This vitamin is abundant in both bananas and banana peels.
Banana peels are packed with polyphenols, carotenoids, and other antioxidants that fight cancer-causing free radicals in your body. Eating more banana peels, especially green, unripe peels, can increase your antioxidant levels and help reduce your risk of cancer.Studies on the anti-cancer properties of banana peels were done in test tubes, not on humans. Further research is needed to understand whether banana peels can lower cancer risk in people.