Can Horses Eat Celery?

Is your horse picky when it comes to treats? You should try feeding them celery! Celery is a unique vegetable that often gets overlooked, but it is actually a very healthy treat for most horses. It is also easy to find at year-round at your local grocery store, so there is no fear of running low on your horses new favorite treat.

Celery is a crunchy, wet vegetable that can be fed as a tasty treat for many horses. Trying to figure out what treats are safe and healthy for your horse can be a challenge, especially if he or she tends to be picky about what they eat.

Thankfully, celery might just be the perfect delicious, low carbohydrate treat for your horse. Celery is very healthy for horses and it is low in sugar which makes it the perfect equine treat! By feeding celery as a treat, you are adding a quality, albeit small, source of fiber to their diet.

The texture of celery also is an added bonus for many horses who enjoy chewing and crunching up their foods. It gives them something tasty without causing additional weight gain like many horse treats do. As a result, celery just might be the perfect treat for your horse if he or she suffers from a metabolic issue such as insulin-resistance.

Horses that suffer from metabolic disorders usually cannot eat foods with high levels of sugars or carbohydrates. You always should consult with your vet before adding any new treats to your horses diet, especially if they have a metabolic disorder. The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) recommends using salt water to rinse off all of your vegetables, including celery.

Remember that some peanut butter is higher in sugar and it may not be healthy for horses in large amounts. You can add chopped up celery in your horses bran mash as a nutritious and tasty additive. Celery is a rather crunchy vegetable, so you should probably not feed it to horses with dental issues, especially if they have significant tooth loss.

Celery contains a relatively high amount of potassium, approximate 286 mg per serving, so it is not considered an acceptable treat for horses suffering from Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP). Its low sugar content combined with its crunchy, fibrous texture actually make it an ideal treat for many horses.

Can horses eat raw celery?

Good Vegetables for Horses. Most horses love to eat carrots, but like other treats, do not feed them too many. Celery: Celery contains a number of vitamins such as Vitamin K, potassium, manganese, Vitamins B2, C, B6, and A. It is also a good source of fiber. Horses can eat both the celery and the celery leaves.

Is celery poisonous to horses?

Horses can enjoy both the stem of the celery and the leaves safely. Just like you would feeding other vegetables to your horse, always cut the celery into small pieces to reduce the risk of choking.

How much celery Can a horse eat?

But still, celery must be cut in pieces before feeding. This is because, some horse love celery so much that they can eat loads of celery in a single bite, without chewing it; which sometimes lead to choking. Furthermore, Horse fanciers recommend feeding a maximum of 2 pounds of celery at a time.

What vegetables can horses not eat?

Vegetables like garlic and onions are members of the family of plants called the “allium” family. (The allium family of plants also includes chives, shallots and leeks.) These plants should generally be avoided by horses because they can damage red blood cells and lead to sickness.

In fact, celery is a healthy treat for horses, which you can include in your horses regular diet. This crunchy vegetable is rich in vitamins, minerals, and fibers and has little sugar.

The usual horse diet consists of forages, such as hay, grass, and different types of grains. Thats because fruits and vegetables are rich in essential vitamins and minerals, beneficial for your horses organism and immune system.

Moreover, many horses enjoy a little variety in their diet and cant get enough of healthy treats, such as apples and carrots. So, dont start panicking if your horse has managed to take a bite or two of a celery stalk. And chewing stimulates saliva production, which can reduce gastric ulcers.

Dental issues, age-related problems, and prior choking accidents put your animal at risk. Moreover, some horses tend to tear huge chunks of food and swallow them without chewing properly. You can also cook the stalk to make it soft enough to chew for horses with dental problems.

In fact, the leaves contain the largest amount of nutrients and are the tastier part of this vegetable. Seeds also have a calming effect on some horses and support your animals liver, kidneys, and urinary tract. Parasites, mold, rot, and microorganism can wreak havoc on your animals digestive system or cause an allergic reaction.

And dont forget to cut the stalk and leaves into small pieces to avoid choking. While delicious, cabbage is a common vegetable that could be dangerous for horses, even in limited quantity. Scientists have discovered that cabbage and other cruciferous family members contain raffinose, a type of sugar.

It seems trivial, but colic, gas-related pain, and digestive upset can be fatal for horses. Compared to green cabbage, the red variety contains more nutrients, vitamins, and minerals. Unlike cabbage, lettuce is easy to digest, has limited sugar content, and is rich in water.

But unlike other common vegetables and fruits, lettuce doesnt have many beneficial vitamins. On the bright side, lettuce contains plenty of water, which helps keep your horse hydrated in hot weather. According to its nutritional profile, this one stalk of this crunchy vegetable contains 5.6 calories, 0.1 g fat, 32 mg of sodium, 1.2 g of carbohydrates, and 0.6 g of fiber.

It has a low carbohydrate count, meaning this vegetable can help your horse maintain a healthy weight. Most insulin-resistant and diabetic horses can also enjoy this low-calorie treat since its unlikely to raise their blood sugar levels. As such, its an acceptable treat for horses with metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance and diabetes.Still, you should consult with your vet before you add anything to your horses daily diet to ensure proper blood sugar control.

In fact, celery leaves are richer in nutrients than the stalk and have a chewy texture. Besides celery, horses can eat pumpkin, beetroot, swede, cucumber, among a few. In general, veterinarians and nutritional specialists recommend no more than two pounds 2-3 times a week.

Stacks and leaves can be an excellent treat for horses as long as you wash them well and feed them in moderation. Clinical Effects of the Extract of the Seeds of the Indian CeleryApium Graveolensin Horses Affected by Chronic Osteoarthritis. Animals : An Open Access Journal from MDPI 9 (8). Odd Things That Horses Eat | Equine Science Center. n.d. Accessed June 8, 2021. https://esc.rutgers.edu/fact_sheet/odd-things-that-horseseat/.

Can horses eat vegetables other than carrots? Absolutely! Horses enjoy celery, corn, lettuce, squash, sweet potatoes, and turnips. Vegetables are excellent sources of vitamins, too.

Made up of ninety percent water pumpkins have a sweet taste, which is probably why some horses enjoy eating it. These vegetables are absolutely NOT safe for your horse to eat: avocados, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, onions, regular potatoes, tomatoes, and peppers.

We all know that a favorite meal for horses is nothing better than grass. Besides, they are also be given vegetables and fruits to have more nutrition. Common vegetables that horses like to eat such as apples, pears, and carrots. However, I was so shocked when I saw horses eat celery. What? Can horses eat celery even though the smell may be weird for them? I was not so sure about it until I decided to find out the answer..

Vitamin A Beta Carotene has the powerful antioxidant to prevent free radicals that damage cells in the horses body. Besides, folate or B9 aids the development of red and white blood cells and helps break down carbohydrates to release energy.

Eating celery can supply a great source of vitamin C which supports to repair of damaged tissues and generate collagen. As a matter of fact, adding celery to your horse diet only results in benefits.

Common Questions for Feeding Celery

If you buy fresh celery that hasn’t been cut up, chances are it will still have some leaves on it.Many horse owners feed it to their horse and they don’t seem to have any issues.Some horses seem to enjoy the leaves more than they do the celery itself.Horses that suffer from metabolic disorders usually cannot eat foods with high levels of sugars or carbohydrates.

Preparing Celery for Your Horse

This just helps to avoid choking and the expenses that accompany such a trauma.Think about it, celery has through a long journey before reaching the grocery store you purchased it from. Multiple people have handled the celery throughout its lifetime and pesticides may have been used during its cultivation.
The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) recommends using salt water to rinse off all of your vegetables, including celery. Afterward, use cold water to rinse off any saltwater residue. (source)After you let the celery dry, you are safe to feed it to your horse.

Can Horses Eat Celery?

The usual horse diet consists of forages, such as hay, grass, and different types of grains.However, a well-balanced diet should also include fruits and vegetables.That’s because fruits and vegetables are rich in essential vitamins and minerals, beneficial for your horse’s organism and immune system.Moreover, many horses enjoy a little variety in their diet and can’t get enough of healthy treats, such as apples and carrots.But what about celery? Is it beneficial or toxic?You’re right to wonder because many common foods are dangerous for animals. For example, chocolate is toxic to horses and other pets.Fortunately, celery isn’t one of the toxic plants. So, don’t start panicking if your horse has managed to take a bite or two of a celery stalk.In fact, celery is a healthy treat for horses, which you can include in your horse’s regular diet. This crunchy vegetable is rich in vitamins, minerals, and fibers and has little sugar.More about the health benefits of this vegetable in a moment. But first, let’s talk about if horses can eat celery stalks, celery leaves, or the whole plant.

Can Horses Eat Celery Stalks?

The stalk is an ideal snack for any horse, even for overweight ones.It’s crunchy, moist, and an excellent source of vitamins and minerals.As the equine nutritionist Fiona Watkins explains, “the texture in celery is high in cellulose, which makes it very good for chewing.”And chewing stimulates saliva production, which can reduce gastric ulcers.The danger is that your horse can choke on the celery stalk. Dental issues, age-related problems, and prior choking accidents put your animal at risk.Moreover, some horses tend to tear huge chunks of food and swallow them without chewing properly.Since horses can’t vomit, it’s easy for these large pieces to get stuck in the throat.So, can horses eat celery sticks? Yes, they can and should as long as owners are careful.Always cut the stalk into small pieces to reduce the risk of choking. The same goes for other vegetables and fruits, including carrots!You can also cook the stalk to make it soft enough to chew for horses with dental problems. But cooking also strips this common vegetable from a lot of its nutrients.

Can Horse Eat Celery Leaves and Seeds?

Just like the stalk, celery leaves are beneficial for horses. In fact, the leaves contain the largest amount of nutrients and are the tastier part of this vegetable.Celery seeds are also safe for horses. They’re used as a warming tonic to deal with stiffness/lameness due to their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.In fact, studies state that seeds have “anti-inflammatory effects that can be compared, to some degree, to those of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs.”Seeds also have a calming effect on some horses and support your animal’s liver, kidneys, and urinary tract.However, these seeds aren’t suitable for all horses, especially pregnant mare. Always consult with your vet before you give any to your horse.

Is Celery Toxic to Horses?

Veterinary and horse specialists alike consider celery non-toxic and safe for horses of all sizes and breeds.Still, there are some risks when you feed your horse celery. The good news is that you can minimize them very easily.First, always go for fresh celery. Parasites, mold, rot, and microorganism can wreak havoc on your animal’s digestive system or cause an allergic reaction.Then, wash this vegetable well before feeding the stalk or the leaves to your horse. It’s vital to remove any traces of chemicals, pesticides, and fertilizers.Otherwise, you can poison your horses, even if you feed them in small quantities. And don’t forget to cut the stalk and leaves into small pieces to avoid choking.Moreover, too much of this green vegetable won’t be good for your horse’s digestive tract. Veterinarians recommend two pounds of celery 2-3 times a week.Watch this video for more information:

Can Horses Eat Cabbage?

While delicious, cabbage is a common vegetable that could be dangerous for horses, even in limited quantity.Scientists have discovered that cabbage and other cruciferous family members contain raffinose, a type of sugar. It causes intestinal gas.It seems trivial, but colic, gas-related pain, and digestive upset can be fatal for horses.And when you’ve got safer horse treats, it’s better to stay away from cabbages.

Can Horses Eat Red Cabbage?

Compared to green cabbage, the red variety contains more nutrients, vitamins, and minerals.It’s also famous for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.But can horses eat red cabbages?Just like green cabbage, Red cabbage contains raffinose, which makes it bad for your horse’s digestive tract.As such, you should avoid red cabbage as much as possible.Still, some owners feed cabbage to their horses with no problems. But it’s something you should do with extreme caution and after talking to your vet.

Can Horses Eat Lettuce?

Unlike cabbage, lettuce is easy to digest, has limited sugar content, and is rich in water. That makes it a tasty treat for horses.But unlike other common vegetables and fruits, lettuce doesn’t have many beneficial vitamins. It’s not enough to satisfy your horse’s dietary needs.On the bright side, lettuce contains plenty of water, which helps keep your horse hydrated in hot weather. And it’s inexpensive and widely available.

Nutritional Benefits of Celery for Horses

Now let’s see the nutritional benefits of this crunchy vegetable and why it’s such an excellent snack for your horses.According to its nutritional profile, this one stalk of this crunchy vegetable contains 5.6 calories, 0.1 g fat, 32 mg of sodium, 1.2 g of carbohydrates, and 0.6 g of fiber.But what all this means for your horse? Let’s find out together.

Healthy Digestive System

Fiber is necessary for the proper function of your horse’s digestive system. It helps your horse absorb the nutrients from its food and is highly digestible.Celery can be an excellent source of fiber because one stick (40g)has 0.6 g of fiber content.Horses need to consume 1.5 of their body weight in forage to get enough fiber.

Improved Hydration

One of the best things about celery is that it’s mainly made of water.As such, it’s an excellent treat for your horse on a hot day and can help keep your horse hydrated.

Low in Carbohydrates and Sugar

It’s no surprise that nutritionists recommend celery when you’re trying to lose weight.It has a low carbohydrate count, meaning this vegetable can help your horse maintain a healthy weight.Most insulin-resistant and diabetic horses can also enjoy this low-calorie treat since it’s unlikely to raise their blood sugar levels.

Can Horses with Metabolic Issues Eat Celery?

Celery is also an excellent source of vitamin A, Vitamin B, Vitamin C, and Vitamin K. It’s also rich in potassium, sodium, magnesium, and phosphorous.But why is that beneficial for your horse? Here’s a quick rundown:As you can see, you’ve got plenty of reasons why you should include celery in your horse’s well-balanced diet.

Can Horses Eat the Leaves on Celery?

Yes, the leaves are as safe for horses. In fact, celery leaves are richer in nutrients than the stalk and have a chewy texture.

What Vegetables Are Good for Horses?

Besides celery, horses can eat pumpkin, beetroot, swede, cucumber, among a few. But what about carrots? Do horses eat carrots?