Can Horses Eat Apples?

It’s nice to treat your horse to special foods sometimes. However, there are a few things they probably shouldn’t eat. What shouldn’t you feed your horse? Here is a list of the foods that probably shouldn’t be included in your horse’s diet.

A few leaves or sprouts may not matter, but dumping the old plants over the fence probably isnt a great idea. It can grow up to 30 inches/76 centimeters high and in addition to its clover-shaped leaves has a round flower head of pretty pink.

If your horse snaps up a few stalks of alsike clover occasionally, its probably okay, but prolonged consumption or a large amount at once may cause problems. Feeding haylage (sometimes called baleage) and silage to horses are more common in the UK and Europe than it is in North America. Because the hay is baled at a high moisture content and is wrapped in plastic it is the ideal environment for botulism to grow.

Soil carrying botulism, poultry manure, small animals and birds can be baled into the hay, contributing to the growth of the bacteria. The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs points out the disadvantages of feeding haylage and silage to horses. A vaccine is available, but it only protects against one of the five types of botulism.

Why are apples bad for horses?

Some horses suffer from metabolic issues such as Cushing’s and insulin resistance. Unfortunately, since apples contain sugar, they probably should not be fed to these horses. There are more healthy treats that are designed specifically for these horses that you can feed them instead.

What fruit can horses not eat?

Any kind of a fruit that has a “stone” in it (or pit), like whole peaches, avocados, and cherries, can be dangerous for a horse, because they could choke on the pit. If your horse consumes any of these three things in excess, then it can lead to very bad gas and colic problems that could hurt them.

Can horses eat small apples?

We all know that horses enjoy eating apples, but can horses eat bananas, pears, and other fruits? Yes! In fact, feeding horses different fruits on occasion gives them a bit of variety and provides them with various nutrients.

What can horses not eat?

Onions & Garlic – Along with leeks, shallots and chives, onions and garlic are members of the Allium family, which if ingested are toxic to horses. This plant family contains the chemical N-propyl disulfide, which damages red blood cells, and in turn can lead to anemia.

Fruit in Large Quantities

Many of us like to feed our horses apples for treats. But sometimes fruits can become too much of a good thing. A belly full of apples or any other fruit can easily cause colic and may lead to founder. You probably may not feed your horse more than one or two pieces of fruit. The danger is when horses have access to windfall fruit from a wild tree, or someone dumps a basket of spoiled apple over the fence thinking they’re giving the horse a ‘treat.’

Lawn and Garden Clippings

Lawn and garden clippings can contain several hazards. Just-cut or semi-wilted plant material can be a problem in itself, even if it appears to contain nothing but grass.

Warning

Clippings can contain toxic plants and there are several common garden plants, like lily of the valley and rhubarb leaves, that fall into this category. Some weeds are toxic. What gets sprayed on lawns and gardens to control pests and weeds may be toxic too, even if it was sprayed a long time ago.Because horses don’t have to graze and chew the material for themselves, they may bolt the food and fill up on it much faster. This can lead to choke and colic. The sugars in freshly cut or slightly wilted clippings can cause an imbalance in the horse’s gut, leading to laminitis. Put lawn and garden waste into your composter or manure pile, not over the fence into your horse’s pasture.

Cruciferous Vegetables

You may already know someone who gets uncomfortable after they eat cabbage, broccoli, kale, brussels sprouts or other vegetables in the cabbage family. Your horse may feel the same type of discomfort after eating ‘gassy’ vegetables like these. A few leaves or sprouts may not matter, but dumping the old plants over the fence probably isn’t a great idea.

Moldy or Dusty Hay

If good pasture is not available, good-quality hay is the next-best choice. However, never feed your horse dusty or moldy hay. To do so could damage its lungs. Learn why it’s not okay to feed hay that’s only a bit dusty or has a bit of mold in it.

Bran Mashes

Many people may be surprised to learn that bran mashes are not recommended except as an occasional treat. Horses eat a lot of fiber in their normal diet, so adding bran can actually affect the gut flora. Bran has little nutrition, so there are much better things to feed a horse than bran or bran mashes.

Alsike Clover

Eating alsike clover may cause a very nasty sunburn, sores in the mouth and cause problems like colic and diarrhea and big liver syndrome. Alsike clover is common in pastures. It can grow up to 30 inches/76 centimeters high and in addition to its clover-shaped leaves has a round flower head of pretty pink. You can tell it apart from red clover because it doesn’t have the distinctive white ‘V’ on the leaves that other clovers do. If your horse snaps up a few stalks of alsike clover occasionally, it’s probably okay, but prolonged consumption or a large amount at once may cause problems.

Cattle Feed

Cattle feed contains supplements that are good for cattle but are very toxic to horses. Drugs like rumencin are routinely added to cattle feed. These drugs can be deadly for horses. This is why it’s a good idea to buy feed from mills that specialize exclusively in making horse feeds.

Silage and Haylage

Feeding haylage (sometimes called baleage) and silage to horses are more common in the UK and Europe than it is in North America. Feeding silage and haylage to horses can be tricky. There are some definite benefits to feeding these fodders, like higher nutritional value and low dust.