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This is a question that more than 3242 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

Grass and hay are notoriously difficult to extract nutritional value from, so their stomachs are designed to digest their meals twice. They achieve that by re-eating their poops the first time around.

Small quantities of orange are a safe and delicious treat for guinea pigs to eat. Oranges are a source of fiber and vitamin C, both of which are vital components of a healthy guinea pig diet. They’re only likely to consume fruits which they find at ground level on their foraging missions. Whereas wild guinea pig species tend to inhabit uncultivated grasslands and forests. And of course, oranges also grow in trees up to 10 meters tall, and guinea pigs can’t climb. Biologically and anatomically, they are highly adapted for a lifetime of eating grass and hay. In captivity, it’s important to make sure guinea pigs still eat a lot of roughage and high-fiber foods. Wild guinea pig species get vitamin C from fresh grasses and foliage. In our homes and yards, pet guinea pigs can receive supplemental vitamin C from leafy greens, fruit and veg, fortified pellets or drops in their water bottle. Oranges are a great supplement to include alongside their daily hay and pellet food. Since guinea pigs’ digestive systems rely on constantly processing large volumes of roughage, they are programmed to eat continually and keep their stomachs full. But if the food they’re packing into their bellies is also high in sugar, it puts them at risk of health problems including tooth decay, obesity, diabetes and cataracts. So guinea pigs can enjoy a juicy orange snack, but it’s wise to restrict their access so they aren’t tempted to fill up on too much of it. You can supplement it with fresh leafy greens, safe fruit and veg, and hay-based commercial guinea pig pellets if you like. Offer orange as small, peeled wedges, not more than once a week, and remove anything that’s left after an hour, before it spoils or attracts flies. If your guinea pigs show signs of diarrhea or soreness around their mouth or bottom, stop offering orange and switch to something less acidic. If your guinea pig gains weight, consider restricting them to low-sugar produce until they’re a healthy size again. It’s best to stick to clean, fresh water for your piggies’ drinks, and serve up their orange in tasty wedges. My own three guinea pigs are always happy to receive a couple of orange wedges with their leafy greens. And I often spot oranges among the foodstuffs in guinea pig enclosures at farm parks and animal sanctuaries. Slices or wedges of orange are a well-received and safe to eat treat for guinea pigs. But they are also high in sugar, so it’s important to make sure they don’t fill up on them in large quantities. Oranges aren’t the only produce packed with fiber and vitamin C which as safe for your guinea pig to eat.

How much orange can I give my guinea pig?

Moderation = 1-2 bites of orange is enough of this fruit for one guinea pig. Because oranges have high acidity, you should not feed it them excess to guinea pig because serious health issues can arise.

Can guinea pigs eat oranges or tangerines?

Citrus fruits are a great source of Vitamin C, so they make a great treat for guinea pigs. … Some of the citrus fruits that are safe to feed your guinea pig include: Oranges. Tangerines.

What are guinea pigs not allowed to eat?

Ensure that your guinea pigs have a constant supply of grass and/or grass hay (such as Timothy, Oaten, Barley, or grassy hay). Guinea pigs should not be fed Lucerne (alfalfa) or Clover hay, as these are too high in protein and calcium.

Can you give guinea pigs mandarin oranges?

Feed in small amounts.. Oranges are a good source of vitamin C for your guinea pigs, but like most fruits they also contain natural sugar. These fruits are at the low end of the middle range when it comes to sugar content. You must understand that too much sugar is not good for your guinea pig.

Guinea pigs love sweet juicy produce as treats. But as many cavy owners know, not all produce that is safe for us to consume, is safe for our little furry buddies to eat. So what about ripe juicy oranges and orange-flavored products? Can guinea pigs eat oranges? Read on to find out!

Oranges are used in many recipes, both food and in drinks, and even as garnishes on the rim of your favorite cocktail. Fiber is important because it helps with digestion and makes blood sugar release slow down. A guinea pig is a type of pocket pet that resides in the cavie family of animals. They are small animals that grow to a maximum of approximately 10-11 inches long, and can weigh up to 2.5 pounds as an adult. Guinea Pigs eat an assortment of things to keep them healthy and happy. High-quality guinea pig food and Timothy hay should be the main staples of their diet. Instead, guinea pigs must get this essential nutrient from the foods they eat in their diet. Guinea pigs in the wild get their vitamin C from fresh grass sources. After reading up on some of the health benefits and some of the risks that the consumption of oranges can bring with it, wouldn’t it be nice it you could just safely feed it to your pet guinea pig? Because oranges have high acidity , you should not feed it them excess to guinea pig because serious health issues can arise. In total, your guinea pig should have around 1/4 – 1/2 cup of fresh fruits and vegetables combined everyday, and no more than that. If your pet does not eat all of their 1/4 – 1/2 cup of fruits and vegetables within 12-24 hours, then you need to dispose of it for them. The rest of their diet, the other 90% or so, should be made up of guinea pig food and hay. Oranges contain some essential nutrients including calcium and Vitamin C that can be helpful in keeping your cavy healthy. Oranges also have some other potential health benefits for your pet guinea pig too: Like I mentioned above, the main advantage of oranges are that they contain high amounts of vitamin C [ source ]. Vitamin C helps support a healthy immune system and is in general “essential” because your guinea pig cannot produce it themselves. Scurvy is just one example of a disease or health concern seen among guinea pigs which occurs due to lack of vitamin C in their systems. Calcium and phosphorous are an integral part of a diet which is necessary for proper bone development, Teeth growth, and other nervous system needs. Too much calcium in your guinea pig’s diet has the potential to lead to the formation of bladder stones, so it must be consumed in small amounts. Guinea Pigs love having little things in their mouths to chew on and to keep them busy and entertained throughout their days! Your guinea pig can safely eat orange peels if properly prepared for your pet. Feed them just a few small pieces of the peel to prevent any unwanted health issues from unintentionally erupting. The reasoning behind this is that the seeds are hard, slippery, and large in comparison to the guinea pig’s small size. This equates to a choking hazard for you pet, so it’s best to remove the seeds before offering your guinea pig a sweet taste of this fruit. No, guinea pigs can not eat canned oranges because they contain high amounts of acid, sugar, sodium and preservatives that have been added to stretch out the shelf life of the oranges. They come in a sugary syrup and all of this can create huge problems for your guinea pig. On top of the orange in the marmalade, but the added sugar is dangerous for your guinea pig. Some Guinea Pigs will love the taste of oranges and other piggies will find their favorite citrus flavor elsewhere. If no signs of diarrhea, inappetance, lethargy, etc., then you can feed your guinea pig another piece of orange in a few days. Remove any uneaten fruit from the guinea pigs cage to prevent bacteria bloom in the food and decrease the attraction of flies. Contact your vet immediately if you note any adverse effects after introducing your guinea pig to a new food. When introducing your guinea pig to anything new, you’ll always want to take it slowly and be very careful . Start off by offering your pet just a single bite of orange the first time, and then watch for about 12-24 hours for any adverse reactions, such as digestive upset, diarrhea, decreased energy, not eating, etc. If your cavy shows any signs of distress or discomfort, then you’ll want to stop feeding the orange pieces and contact your veterinarian about the current situation for further guidance. As long as your guinea pig shows no signs of an adverse reaction, you can gradually increase the amount of oranges you are offering until they’re enjoying a full serving- which still isn’t a lot of the fruit! Guinea pigs can show digestive upset like diarrhea, decreased eating or anorexia, dehydration, lethargy , etc., that can lead to more dangerous health issues of not treated by your veterinarian. Fruits, especially citrus like oranges, contain acids which can give your guinea pig some uncomfortable side effects. Increased acidity can lead to teeth problems, mouth sores, and a slew of other medical issues. If your guinea pig shows signs of any of these after introducing them to any new food in their diet, contact your local veterinarian immediately for more help. There are some major health risks to consider before feeding your guinea pig any citrus fruits. For this reason, it is very important to research every new food you plan to give your guinea pig and its corresponding serving size. Make sure to weigh the pros and cons of feeding oranges to your guinea pig before tossing them a delicious fruity snack, and if you do decide to give them a yummy trea t, remember, it’s safe in moderation. If your pet experiences a change in their everyday activities, such as activity level, sleeping patterns, elimination patterns, or behavior, after eating a new food such as oranges, contact your veterinarian immediately for assistance on what to do next.

The key to a happy pet is a healthy one. In the case of guinea pigs, vitamin C dietary supplementation can make a world of difference. The fluffy rodents’ bodies simply don’t generate the beneficial vitamin by themselves. Thankfully, fresh oranges can help do the important work for them.

If you feed your guinea pig fresh oranges on a regular basis, he probably won’t experience vitamin C deficiencies and the frustrating health problems that are sometimes associated with them, whether arthritis or immobility. Fresh vegetables and fruits are important nutritional supplements in the guinea pig diet, whether cucumbers, romaine lettuce, pears, apples or any other cavy-friendly items. To keep your wee pet’s sugar intake under control, always keep the amounts of oranges you feed him well in moderation — think a little wedge that is approximately one cubic inch in size. If you give your guinea pig too much orange, you run the risk of him not finishing it, and therefore leaving spoiling food in his vicinity. Never be sudden or abrupt with any changes in foods, as that could lead to unpleasant diarrhea and tummy ache issues in your poor pet.

Like most guinea pig owners, you probably want to spoil your pet as much as possible. A lot of owners like to do so by giving their guinea pig delicious treats, including fruits. We’ll discuss some of the best fruits to give your guinea pig, explain the proper way to provide them to your pet and list a few of their favorites below.

Giving your guinea pig small amounts of fruit is not only a great way to spoil your pet, but it’ll also help ensure he receives enough Vitamin C in his diet. You want to offer most types of berries in moderation, but most are full of Vitamin C and other nutrients that’ll help keep your pet healthy. However, you needn’t worry about these technical definitions when feeding your guinea pig – just consider any edible fruit with the word “berry” in it to be safe. There are a variety of different tropical fruits available at many grocery stores and farmer’s markets, and several of them are safe to feed your guinea pig. It is important to avoid giving the pit from stone fruits to your pet, as many are full of cyanide and other toxic substances. However, you must be sure to offer them in small amounts, as they can cause guinea pigs to suffer from mouth sores if fed in excess. The following 12 fruits will not only provide your guinea pig with plenty of vitamins and minerals, but they’ll also please your pet’s palate. Apples aren’t especially nutritious, but they don’t present many risks and most guinea pigs appear to enjoy them, so they are fine to offer in moderation. But while they have little sugar, strawberries have an abundance of Vitamin C, making them even more attractive for feeding guinea pigs. Some guinea pig owners like to give their pets the tops of strawberries along with the actual fruit. Small pieces are not only easier for guinea pigs to handle, but they will also emit more appetizing odors than large, intact strawberries will. Kiwi does contain a bit of sugar (although not as much as blueberries, pears or apples), but it has more Vitamin C than just about any other fruit you can give your pet. This combination makes them very attractive for guinea pig owners, and you can probably give your pet a small amount of papaya twice each week . To prepare papaya for your pet, simply cut the flesh into small cubes or slices. Peaches aren’t very nutritious, but most guinea pigs seem to enjoy them, so they can still make a good occasional treat for your pet. Like other members of the rose family, most parts of peach trees (aside from the actual fruit) are full of cyanide. Additionally, you’ll want to cut peaches into small slices or cubes before feeding them to your pet. Cut the cantaloupe into small pieces or slices to make them easy for your pet to enjoy. Many guinea pigs enjoy apricots, so they make a good occasional treat for your pet. Cut the apricots into small pieces or slices and be sure to remove any leaves or stems present, as well as the hard stone in the center. Apricots are members of the rose family, so cyanide is present in the leaves, stems and pit. Generally speaking, you’ll want to avoid giving any of the fruits listed below to your guinea pig. To ensure the safety of your guinea pig, be sure to discuss the issue with your vet before feeding them to your pet. But the biggest reason you’ll want to avoid giving grapes to your pet is that they can lead to kidney disease. Many parts of the avocado tree contain persin – a fatty acid that is toxic to many domestic animals, including dogs, cats, horses and guinea pigs. Some keepers have safely offered the flesh of the avocado to their guinea pig, but this is generally a practice to avoid. Avocado flesh is extraordinarily fatty (which is part of the reason many people find it so delicious), which can cause severe digestive problems for guinea pigs. Sugar content is one of the most important things to keep in mind when deciding which fruits to give your guinea pig. Accordingly, we’ve listed some of the most common fruits fed to guinea pigs and their respective sugar and Vitamin C content below. FruitGrams of Sugar per OunceMilligrams of Vitamin C per OunceOranges2.614.9Apples2.91.3Pears2.71.2Strawberries1.416.5Blueberries2.82.7Kiwi2.526Papayas1.717.3Peaches2.31.8Honeydew Melon2.35Cantaloupe2.210.3Bananas3.42.4Apricots2.62.8 While it is often a good idea to incorporate fruit into your guinea pig’s diet, you must be sure to prepare it properly. Some fruits have toxic stems, leaves, seeds or pits, and others are too difficult for guinea pigs to eat unless they are cut into small pieces. It is always nice to save money, but you don’t want to purchase fruit from a questionable source, as it may be contaminated with pests or already rotting. Just wash the outside of the fruit with warm water and a tiny bit of soap, and then rinse it off completely. Guinea pigs have big teeth, but they will still have an easier time eating the fruits you offer them if you cut them into small pieces first. Accordingly, you’ll want to allow any fruit you intend to feed your guinea pig to warm to room temperature before giving it to your pet. Note that many fruits you can give to your guinea pig – including bananas, apples, pears, oranges and kiwi, among others – can be safely stored at room temperature anyway. In many cases, you’ll find that your guinea pig fails to consume all of the fruit you offer. These uneaten portions of fruit will quickly begin to rot as bacteria colonize their surfaces, and they’ll also tend to attract flies. Accordingly, you’ll always want to be sure to remove the core, stem and any seeds present before feeding your pet any apple slices. Just be sure to remove the core, stem and any seeds present, as these structures contain cyanide, which could make your pet very sick. Just be sure that you cut the rind into small pieces before offering it, so that it is easy for your pet to handle and consume. However, they simply aren’t appealing to many guinea pigs, who’d rather eat the delicious flesh of bananas, instead. So, while you are free to offer your guinea pig small pieces of banana peel once or twice a month, don’t be surprised if your pet doesn’t eat them. Some guinea pig owners give their pet the tops of strawberries, but this is generally something to avoid. This may cause serious illness or death, so it is generally a good idea to avoid sharing them with your pet. Guinea pigs like the way many fruits taste, which helps improve their quality of life, and some are full of Vitamin C, fiber, potassium and other important nutrients.

Do Wild Guinea Pigs Eat Oranges?

Unlikely.Pet guinea pigs all belong to the speciesThis species was founded in captivity and doesn’t exist in the wild.But close wild ancestors including the Brazilian guinea pig, the montane guinea pig, and the shiny guinea pig still live all over South America.

Wild Guinea Pig Diet

Wild guinea pigs survive by grazing on grasses and other foliage.They’re only likely to consume fruits which they find at ground level on their foraging missions.But oranges are another hybrid, also created by humans by crossing pomelos and mandarins.That means that oranges are only usually found in places where they are being cultivated by people.Whereas wild guinea pig species tend to inhabit uncultivated grasslands and forests.And of course, oranges also grow in trees up to 10 meters tall, and guinea pigs can’t climb.So it’s fairly unlikely that many wild guinea pigs will happen across an orange in their lifetime.But does that mean their domestic brethren should keep away too?

The Natural Pet Guinea Pig Diet

Guinea pigs are herbivores, which means they need an entirely plant-based diet.Biologically and anatomically, they are highly adapted for a lifetime of eating grass and hay.Grass and hay are notoriously difficult to extract nutritional value from, so their stomachs are designed to digest their meals twice. They achieve that by re-eating their poops the first time around.The fibers in grass are also hard wearing on teeth, so guinea pigs’ teeth grow continuously throughout their life.In captivity, it’s important to make sure guinea pigs still eat a lot of roughage and high-fiber foods.Otherwise they can develop intestinal upset, and their teeth can grow painfully long.

The Importance of Vitamin C For Guinea Pigs

Like humans, bats and birds, guinea pigs have lost the ability to make vitamin C.They still need it, so they need to receive it in their diet.Wild guinea pig species get vitamin C from fresh grasses and foliage.In our homes and yards, pet guinea pigs can receive supplemental vitamin C from leafy greens, fruit and veg, fortified pellets or drops in their water bottle.But what about from a ripe and tasty orange?

Can Guinea Pigs Eat Oranges?

Yes, oranges are a safe foodstuff for guinea pigs.They aren’t toxic, and they won’t harm your cavy pet.But can they go another step further and even be

Are Oranges Good for Guinea Pigs?

Oranges are certainly a respectable source of some of guinea pigs’ nutritional requirements.A typical orange contains 2.5 grams of fiber and just over 50 milligrams of vitamin C per 100g grams of fruit.This is good news for guinea pigs!Oranges are a great supplement to include alongside their daily hay and pellet food.But it’s important to think of them as a treat food rather than a dietary staple.Let’s find out why.

Are Oranges Bad for Guinea Pigs?

Oranges have nutritional upsides for guinea pigs, but they also have one big downside.And that’s the amount of sugar they contain.Since guinea pigs’ digestive systems rely on constantly processing large volumes of roughage, they are programmed to eat continually and keep their stomachs full.But if the food they’re packing into their bellies is also high in sugar, it puts them at risk of health problems including tooth decay, obesity, diabetes and cataracts.So guinea pigs can enjoy a juicy orange snack, but it’s wise to restrict their access so they aren’t tempted to fill up on too much of it.

How To Feed Guinea Pigs Orange Safely

With oranges, as with so many good things in life, moderation is key.Your guinea pigs diet should be predominantly hay.You can supplement it with fresh leafy greens, safe fruit and veg, and hay-based commercial guinea pig pellets if you like.Offer orange as small, peeled wedges, not more than once a week, and remove anything that’s left after an hour, before it spoils or attracts flies.If your guinea pigs show signs of diarrhea or soreness around their mouth or bottom, stop offering orange and switch to something less acidic.If your guinea pig gains weight, consider restricting them to low-sugar produce until they’re a healthy size again.

Can Guinea Pigs Have Orange Juice?

Did you know that 85% of oranges are destined to be turned into orange juice?We can’t get enough of this sunny beverage with our breakfast!Orange juice isn’t poisonous to guinea pigs, but juice doesn’t contain the same amount of fiber as whole fruit.So straight away, OJ is missing some of the nutritional benefit for guinea pigs.It’s best to stick to clean, fresh water for your piggies’ drinks, and serve up their orange in tasty wedges.

Do Guinea Pigs Like Oranges?

As a rule, guinea pigs enjoy fruit, and oranges are no exception.My own three guinea pigs are always happy to receive a couple of orange wedges with their leafy greens.And I often spot oranges among the foodstuffs in guinea pig enclosures at farm parks and animal sanctuaries.Of course individuals have different tastes and preferences just like we humans do.So if you try offering your guinea pig a little orange, and it gets roundly rejected, nevermind.

Can Guinea Pigs Eat Oranges? Summary

Slices or wedges of orange are a well-received and safe to eat treat for guinea pigs.Oranges contain fiber and vitamin C, which guinea pigs need to remain healthy.But they are also high in sugar, so it’s important to make sure they don’t fill up on them in large quantities.

Alternatives To Oranges

Oranges aren’t the only produce packed with fiber and vitamin C which as safe for your guinea pig to eat.You can also try offering them:

Does Your Guinea Pigs Love Orange?

Do your guinea pigs enjoy tucking into a wedge of juicy orange?Or is there another treat they prefer?Let us know in the comments box down below!

Let’s Talk Oranges:

Oranges are a orange-colored citrus fruit.This round fruit has a tough, thick peel or rind, and juicy sweet edible fruit inside.Oranges are used in many recipes, both food and in drinks, and even as garnishes on the rim of your favorite cocktail.Oranges have a list of health benefits, but also have some health drawbacks too.

What is a Guinea Pig?

Let’s take a look at an overview of the contents, nutrients, and minerals of oranges:

The Importance of Vitamin C For Guinea Pigs

Guinea Pigs eat an assortment of things to keep them healthy and happy.

Can Guinea Pigs Eat Oranges?

After reading up on some of the health benefits and some of the risks that the consumption of oranges can bring with it, wouldn’t it be nice it you could just safely feed it to your pet guinea pig?Well,Because oranges have
In total, your guinea pig should have aroundAnd that 1/4 – 1/2 cup should not consists solely of pieces of orange!Remember, orange pieces are an acceptable treat to feed to guinea pigs as long as it is anIf your piggy does not eat the orange, it will only sit in their cage and get old and eventually become unsafe to eat.If your pet does not eat all of their 1/4 – 1/2 cup of fruits and vegetables within 12-24 hours, then you need toThe rest of their diet, the other 90% or so, should be made up of guinea pig food and hay.You should feed this amount

Is It Healthy For a Guinea Pig to Eat Oranges?

Even though oranges are highly acidic, they do have some health benefits.Oranges contain someOranges also have some other potential health benefits for your pet guinea pig too:Like I mentioned above, the main advantage of oranges are that they contain high amounts of vitamin C [source].Vitamin C helps support a healthyOranges also contain a considerable amount of vitamin A and vitamin B-6 which aid in overallOranges have some other lesser-known health benefits too.Oranges areHowever, these extra calories may give your furry friend the calorie intake that they need for an energy boost.Oranges alsoCalcium and phosphorous are an integral part of a diet which is necessary for proper bone development, Teeth growth, and other nervous system needs.Too much calcium in your guinea pig’s diet has the potential to lead to the formation of bladder stones, so it must be consumed in small amounts.

How About Orange Peels?

Guinea Pigs love having little things in their mouths to chew on and to keep them busy and entertained throughout their days!Your guinea pig canThe orange’s peel contains high amounts of vitamin C, so it’s important not to overdo it on feeding your pig the peel.Feed them justPeels could contain pesticides, so if serving your pig orange peels, make sure to wash them thoroughly before serving it.Many guinea pigs don’t like the taste of the peel so don’t worry if your piggie doesn’t eat the rind.

Can they Eat Orange Seeds?

No, guinea pigsThe reasoning behind this is that the seeds are hard, slippery, and large in comparison to the guinea pig’s small size.This equates to a

Can Guinea Pigs Eat Canned Oranges?

No, guinea pigsThey come in a sugary syrup and all of this can create huge problems for your guinea pig.Do NOT feed your pet canned oranges… ever.

Can Guinea Pigs Drink Orange Juice?

You also do not want to give your guinea pig orange juice.Orange juice has too much sugar for their digestive systems to handle, and some juices even contain additional ingredients that may be harmful for them as well.

Can Guinea Pigs Have Orange Marmalade?

No, no, no. On top of the orange in the marmalade, but the added sugar is dangerous for your guinea pig.

Can They Have Orange Juice Concentrate?

Nope – Guinea pigs shouldn’t have orange juice and they should have orange juice concentrate for the same reasons.

How To Feed Oranges To Guinea Pigs:

Some Guinea Pigs will love the taste of oranges and other piggies will find their favorite citrus flavor elsewhere.However, it is most often one of their favorite fruits to snack on.So how do you safely feed oranges to your pet guinea pig?

How to Feed Oranges to Guinea Pigs

Tips on how to safely feed your guinea pig oranges!

Tools

Notes

How Much Orange To Serve To Your Guinea Pig?

When introducing your guinea pig to anything new, you’ll always want toStart off by offering your pet just a single bite of orange the first time, and thenIf your cavy shows any signs of distress or discomfort, then you’ll want to stop feeding the orange pieces and contact your veterinarian about the current situation for further guidance.That being said, most guinea pigs take to oranges very well.As long as your guinea pig shows no signs of an adverse reaction, you canIt’s best toYou should serveThose few times a week also need to be spaced out – no two days in a row!

Are Oranges Harmful To Guinea Pigs?

Yes,Too big of pieces could lead to the potential of being a choking hazard. Not good!Feeding too many oranges has its own set of issues to.Guinea pigs can show digestive upset likeDue to the sugar content and the small bodies of the guinea pig, guinea pigs are prone to becomingFruits, especially citrus like oranges, contain acids which can give your guinea pig some uncomfortable side effects.If your guinea pig shows signs of any of these after introducing them to any new food in their diet,There are some majorOranges can be unhealthy in large amounts, despite their many health benefits.

Oranges for Vitamin C

For guinea pigs, citrus fruits such as oranges can provide much-needed vitamin C content, according to the Small Animal Channel. If you feed your guinea pig fresh oranges on a regular basis, he probably won’t experience vitamin C deficiencies and the frustrating health problems that are sometimes associated with them, whether arthritis or immobility.

High in Sugar

Fresh vegetables and fruits are important nutritional supplements in the guinea pig diet, whether cucumbers, romaine lettuce, pears, apples or any other cavy-friendly items. Although oranges are indeed packed full with vitamin C, they also are very sugary, like other fruits. To keep your wee pet’s sugar intake under control, always keep the amounts of oranges you feed him well in moderation — think a little wedge that is approximately one cubic inch in size. Also remember that oranges consist of ample citric acid — another reason to practice moderation in feeding them.

Preparation of Fruit

Before you feed your guinea pig any fruit, or vegetable for that matter, it is absolutely vital to first rinse them thoroughly. Diligently extract any seeds that may be present within the orange, and then slice the fruit up into manageable bits. Also extract the rind. If you give your guinea pig too much orange, you run the risk of him not finishing it, and therefore leaving spoiling food in his vicinity. It’s important to make sure your pet never has access to any foods that are less than fresh, full stop.

Can Guinea Pigs Eat Fruit?

Although high-quality pellets and hay should make up the bulk of your guinea pig’s diet, you can also feed your pet a small amount of fruit from time to time. Giving your guinea pig small amounts of fruit is not only a great way to spoil your pet, but it’ll also help ensure he receives enough Vitamin C in his diet.However, it is extremely important to limit the amount of fruit you give your pet. The sugar content in most fruits is very high, and excess sugar can cause digestive problems for your pet. Over the long-term, your pet may even become diabetic if he eats too much sugar.In most cases, you’ll want to offer fruit no more than once or twice each week.

What Types of Fruit Can Guinea Pigs Eat?

Although you can give your guinea pig small amounts of fruit, you have to be careful to offer your pet fruits that are safe for him to eat – there are a few fruits that can make your guinea pig sick. We’ll discuss the fruits you need to avoid later, but first, we’ll start by explaining some of the basic types of fruit that are safe for your pet.

Melons

Most berries are safe to feed your guinea pig. You want to offer most types of berries in moderation, but most are full of Vitamin C and other nutrients that’ll help keep your pet healthy.Note that the term “berry” has a pretty strict biological definition. For example, strawberries aren’t berries at all, while watermelons are actually a type of very large berry. but we simply mean fruits that have the word “berry” in their name. However, you needn’t worry about these technical definitions when feeding your guinea pig – just consider any edible fruit with the word “berry” in it to be safe.Some of the berries you can offer your guinea pig include:

Stone Fruits

There are a variety of different tropical fruits available at many grocery stores and farmer’s markets, and several of them are safe to feed your guinea pig. Just be sure that you’ve properly identified any fruits you plan on giving your pet, as many tropical fruits are known by several different names. If you are ever in doubt about the correct identification of a fruit, just refrain from giving it to your pet.Some of the most commonly available tropical fruits that are safe to feed your guinea pig include:

Miscellaneous Fruits

Citrus fruits are a great source of Vitamin C, so they make a great treat for guinea pigs. However, you must be sure to offer them in small amounts, as they can cause guinea pigs to suffer from mouth sores if fed in excess. It is important to remove any seeds present in citrus fruits before offering them to your pet.Some of the citrus fruits that are safe to feed your guinea pig include:

The 12 Best Fruits for Guinea Pigs

Now that we’ve discussed all of the different types of fruit that your guinea pig can eat, we need to talk about the best fruits to offer. The following 12 fruits will not only provide your guinea pig with plenty of vitamins and minerals, but they’ll also please your pet’s palate.

1. Oranges

Many guinea pigs love to eat oranges – some appear to prefer oranges over just about any other fruit. Oranges are full of Vitamin C and they serve as a great source of water and fiber too. However, oranges are very acidic and they also contain quite a bit of sugar, so you must offer them sparingly.You can give your guinea pig a wedge from an orange about

2. Apples

Apples aren’t especially nutritious, but they don’t present many risks and most guinea pigs appear to enjoy them, so they are fine to offer in moderation. Apples serve as a minor source of Vitamin C, and they also provide guinea pigs with a small amount of fiber, potassium, and Vitamins K and B6.Be sure to cut apples into small cubes or slices and leave the peels intact. The peels not only contain vitamins and fiber, but they also provide your pet with an interesting texture that he may enjoy. You can offer apples to your pet about

3. Pears

Pears are quite similar to apples in many respects. They don’t offer a ton of nutritional value, but they don’t present many big problems, and most guinea pigs appear to enjoy them. Pears have a little less Vitamin C than apples do, but they also contain less sugar too.You can offer your guinea pig a slice or two of pear about

4. Strawberries

Strawberries are undoubtedly one of the best fruits to offer guinea pigs. As you may expect, given their tart flavor, strawberries have relatively low sugar content. In fact, strawberries have less sugar than any of the other fruits we recommend feeding guinea pigs. But while they have little sugar, strawberries have an abundance of Vitamin C, making them even more attractive for feeding guinea pigs.Some guinea pig owners like to give their pets the tops of strawberries along with the actual fruit. However, this is probably not a good practice. Strawberries are members of the rose family (Rosaceae), and, like most other members of this family, the green portions of the plant contain small amounts of cyanide, which may sicken your pet.You probably don’t need to cut strawberries into small pieces, but they may be more attractive to your pet if you do. Small pieces are not only easier for guinea pigs to handle, but they will also emit more appetizing odors than large, intact strawberries will.

5. Blueberries

Most guinea pigs appear to love blueberries. However, it is important to offer them in moderation, as they have quite a bit of sugar. They offer some Vitamin C, but not enough to offset the amount of sugar they contain. Blueberries are best reserved as an occasional,Blueberries can be offered as-is, but you may be able to make them more appealing to your pet by squishing them before you offer them to your guinea pig. This will release more appetizing aromas and make it easier for your pet to eat them.

6. Kiwi

Kiwi is a fantastic fruit for guinea pigs. In fact, it may be the single best fruit to offer your pet. Kiwi does contain a bit of sugar (although not as much as blueberries, pears or apples), but it has more Vitamin C than just about any other fruit you can give your pet.Be sure to cut kiwi into small pieces for your guinea pig, but feel free to leave the fuzzy skin on – the skin is very rich in fiber, which will help keep your guinea pig’s digestive tract operating properly. You can give your pet a few bits of kiwi

7. Papayas

Papayas are a very high-value fruit to offer your guinea pig. Papayas are not only full of Vitamin C, but they also have less sugar than many other common fruits. This combination makes them very attractive for guinea pig owners, and you can probably give your pet a small amount of papayaNote that you’ll want to avoid dried papaya; use fresh papaya instead. To prepare papaya for your pet, simply cut the flesh into small cubes or slices. Be sure to remove any seeds present, as well as all of the skin.

8. Peaches

Peaches aren’t very nutritious, but most guinea pigs seem to enjoy them, so they can still make a good occasional treat for your pet. Just be sure that you don’t offer them more than aboutLike other members of the rose family, most parts of peach trees (aside from the actual fruit) are full of cyanide. Accordingly, you’ll want to be sure to remove any stems or leaves present before offering peaches to your pet. Additionally, you’ll want to cut peaches into small slices or cubes before feeding them to your pet.

9. Honeydew Melon

Honeydew melon is another fruit that most guinea pigs appear to love – it even appears to be the favorite fruit of many individuals. Although it contains more sugar than would be considered ideal, a honeydew melon also contains a moderate amount of Vitamin C and quite a bit of potassium, which helps make it an acceptable treat to offer from time to time.You can probably offer your guinea pig a small amount of honeydew melon

10. Cantaloupe

Cantaloupe is another healthy and tasty fruit that many guinea pigs appear to love. Cantaloupe provides an abundance of Vitamin C, as well as a modest amount of Vitamin A and potassium, which make it one of the most nutritious fruits you can offer your pet. Cantaloupe does contain some sugar, although it doesn’t have as much as some other fruits.You can offer your pet Cantaloupe to your pet

11. Bananas

Bananas are a pretty good treat for guinea pigs, and most seem to love the way they taste. Bananas are a good source of fiber, potassium and Vitamin B6. However, bananas have too much sugar to offer them frequently, so you should only give them to your pet aboutCut the banana into small slices before offering it to your pet. You can leave part of the peel intact if you like; the peel is edible, and it contains quite a bit of fiber. However, while many guinea pigs enjoy the flesh of bananas, many won’t enjoy the peel and will simply ignore it.

12. Apricots

Many guinea pigs enjoy apricots, so they make a good occasional treat for your pet. However, apricots are not a very healthy food item, as they’re full of sugar and they have relatively little Vitamin C. Nevertheless, you can give them to your pet aboutJust be sure to stick to fresh apricots, rather than dried apricots. Cut the apricots into small pieces or slices and be sure to remove any leaves or stems present, as well as the hard stone in the center. Apricots are members of the rose family, so cyanide is present in the leaves, stems and pit.

Fruits You Shouldn’t Give Your Guinea Pig

While most fruits are safe to give your guinea pig, there are a few that you’ll need to avoid. Some may cause obvious problems shortly after feeding them to your pet, while others may not trigger any obvious symptoms. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t causing harm to your pet’s body.Generally speaking, you’ll want to avoid giving any of the fruits listed below to your guinea pig.

Peppers

Peppers are another example of a fruit that most people think of as a vegetable, but they are, in fact, fruits (anything with seeds is a fruit in the botanical sense of the word).No matter what you call them, peppers are generally not good to feed to guinea pigs. Spicy peppers – including jalapeno or habanero peppers, among others – are obviously not a good idea to feed your pet. They may burn your pet’s mouth and severely irritate his digestive system.But it isn’t only the spicy peppers that are dangerous for guinea pigs; you should avoid feeding your guinea pig any type of pepper. Peppers — even green bell peppers, which are not spicy at all — can cause guinea pigs to experience gas and bloating.Nevertheless, some authorities recommend including sweet peppers (bell peppers) in the diets of guinea pigs. To ensure the safety of your guinea pig, be sure to discuss the issue with your vet before feeding them to your pet.

Grapes and Raisins

It is not a good idea to feed your guinea pig grapes or raisins. Both of these fruits are not only full of sugar, but they also don’t offer many vitamins to your pet, either. But the biggest reason you’ll want to avoid giving grapes to your pet is that they can lead to kidney disease.Some guinea pig owners feed raisins to their pets without a problem, but it is better to be safe than sorry – especially when there are so many other fruits you can feed your guinea pig that are perfectly safe.

Avocados

Many parts of the avocado tree contain persin – a fatty acid that is toxic to many domestic animals, including dogs, cats, horses and guinea pigs. Persin can not only sicken these animals, but it has also actually been implicated in several deaths.Some keepers have safely offered the flesh of the avocado to their guinea pig, but this is generally a practice to avoid. Avocado flesh is extraordinarily fatty (which is part of the reason many people find it so delicious), which can cause severe digestive problems for guinea pigs.Accordingly, it is simply wisest to avoid giving your guinea pig any avocado at all.

Preparing Fruit for Your Guinea Pig

Sugar content is one of the most important things to keep in mind when deciding which fruits to give your guinea pig. Excess sugar consumption can lead to diabetes and, potentially, cataracts. It may also lead to digestive problems, such as bloating, excess gas and diarrhea.But while you want to select fruits with as little sugar as possible, it is also important to incorporate plenty of fruits that are rich in Vitamin C. As discussed earlier, guinea pigs are unable to synthesize Vitamin C internally as some other pets (such as dogs) are.Accordingly, we’ve listed some of the most common fruits fed to guinea pigs and their respective sugar and Vitamin C content below.

1. Purchase the Fruit from Reputable Sources

It is always nice to save money, but you don’t want to purchase fruit from a questionable source, as it may be contaminated with pests or already rotting. This could cause your pet to become intoxicated, sick, which will necessitate an expensive trip to the vet. In some cases, your pet may even die.You can grow your guinea pig’s fruit if you like, but you’ll need to come up with some other way to use the excess fruit produced. Your guinea pig won’t be able to eat very much, so you’ll have plenty of leftovers.

2. Wash All Fruit

Most fruits sold in grocery stores and farmer’s markets will have residual pesticides on them (unless you stick to the organic section of the store). So, you’ll need to wash these off to prevent your pet from becoming extremely sick. Just wash the outside of the fruit with warm water and a tiny bit of soap, and then rinse it off completely.It is especially important to do this before you begin cutting the fruit, as the knife may spread the pesticides throughout the interior of the fruit.

3. Cut the Fruit into Small Pieces

Guinea pigs have big teeth, but they will still have an easier time eating the fruits you offer them if you cut them into small pieces first. You can leave a bit of the skin intact for many fruits, including oranges, bananas and kiwi, but you’ll need to remove the rind or skin from many others – especially those with very thick rinds, such as cantaloupe.Most guinea pig owners simply cut fruit into small cubes, but you may find that small, thin slices are more appealing to many. Thin slices of fruit will help spread appealing aromas through your guinea pig’s enclosure, which will help encourage him to enjoy the tasty treats.

4. Let the Fruit Warm to Room Temperature

Guinea pigs do not usually enjoy cold fruit. In fact, cold fruits can even make some guinea pigs sick. Accordingly, you’ll want to allow any fruit you intend to feed your guinea pig to warm to room temperature before giving it to your pet. Be sure to do this before you begin washing and cutting the fruit for best results.Note that many fruits you can give to your guinea pig – including bananas, apples, pears, oranges and kiwi, among others – can be safely stored at room temperature anyway.

5. Remove Any Uneaten Fruit Promptly

In many cases, you’ll find that your guinea pig fails to consume all of the fruit you offer. These uneaten portions of fruit will quickly begin to rot as bacteria colonize their surfaces, and they’ll also tend to attract flies. Consequently, you’ll want to remove any uneaten fruits after about an hour or so.Not only will this help keep your guinea pig’s enclosure clean and dry, but it’ll also help prevent offensive odors from developing.

6. Always Wash Your Guinea Pig’s Food Dishes Frequently

Because you don’t want your guinea pig’s fruit to become contaminated from the bedding in his cage, it is important to place the fruit inside some type of bowl. Use a separate bowl for your pet’s pellets and fresh fruits and be sure to wash the fruit bowl after each feeding with soap and warm water.