Can Dogs Eat Pomegranate?

Pomegranate is a delicious fruit, perfect in its balance of being both sweet and tart. While they are a pain to dissect, once you get to the juicy seeds in the middle, all of the work will be worth it. Pomegranates are some of the most nutritionally dense foods available for humans, but the conclusion is definitive on how good they are for dogs.

Vomiting is normal, and you dont need to be alarmed or seek veterinary attention unless it continues for more than 24 hours or they become extremely weak and lethargic. Ignoring those sweet puppy eyes can be difficult, but giving in isnt worth it if your dog is going to suffer from a pomegranite induced sour stomach afterwards.

Are pomegranates poisonous for dogs?

Pomegranates come from the Lythraceae plant family. This family is not toxic to dogs, according to the ASPCA. Pomegranate season in North America begins around October and runs through February (just like citrus fruits), which means they’re often incorporated into tablescapes and recipes.

Is pomegranate good for dogs to eat?

First and foremost, pomegranates themselves are not toxic to dogs. In fact, pomegranates have plenty of health benefits to offer our pets in fruit, juice, and extract form. These beautiful fall fruits are rich in antioxidants and high in fiber, potassium, folic acid, and vitamin C.

Can dogs eat pomegranate skin?

While pomegranates can be beneficial, consuming pomegranate also poses some risks for dogs. “ Pomegranate skins/peels should not be eaten by dogs. Although extracts are derived from them, they contain tannins that cause digestive upset,” says Hayes.

What fruits can dogs not have?

Grapes and raisins. The first on our list has to be raisins and grapes. ….Avocados. ….Pips, seeds and stones. ….Mushrooms. ….Nuts. ….Unripe tomatoes. ….Onions and garlic. ….Nutmeg.

If you feel like youre seeing pomegranates popping up everywhere these days, youre onto something. Though humans have enjoyed the tart taste and health benefits of pomegranates for millennia (fun fact: scholars believe pomegranates were one of the first fruits ever cultivated), now the nutrient-packed fruit is gaining popularity as an ingredient in dog food and treats, too.

The leaves are not edible for dogs and can contain high levels of toxins, notes Dr. Cristine Hayes, medical director at ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. All parts of the fruit (skin, flesh, and seeds) are rich in polyphenols (compounds packed with antioxidants), which is why you might be interested in sharing some pomegranate with your pup.

Adds Luisana, The seeds themselves are generally safe in moderation and a good source of naturally occurring antioxidants (such as vitamin C and polyphenols) and fiber. Overall, pomegranate contains antioxidants, which are frequently used in the formulation of dog food and dietary supplements to support health and reduce inflammation, according to Hayes. Extracts have been studied as a treatment for canine oral health issues ( 2 ), such as halitosis (also known as stinky dog breath).

If you plan to feed your pup any pomegranate, always check to ensure that it is fresh and that it has an acceptable sugar content, especially if your dog has diabetes. So finding the appropriate amount for your pup depends on several factors, including their size and whether they have a history of digestive tract disease. Especially when introducing a new food to a pet, I recommend starting small and monitoring closely for any negative side effects, notes Luisana.

Pomegranates and dogs have a rocky relationship. When the fruit is measured out and cooked into high quality dog food by professionals, its totally fine for canines. But, if your dog snatches a raw pomegranate from the counter and devours it, seeds and all, get ready for some vomit and diarrhea clean up.

Pomegranate season in North America begins around October and runs through February (just like citrus fruits), which means theyre often incorporated into tablescapes and recipes . However, that study only looked at six dogs , hardly a large enough sample size to determine any real data on the fruits effect on canines in general.

If you catch your pup red-handed gobbling down an entire raw pomegranate, its a good idea to call your vet or Animal Poison Control .

Fresh, jewel-colored pomegranates are popular at the holidays for good reason: their seeds make a great garnish, and the fruits themselves are a stunning centerpiece. Not only that, but theyre a staple in Persian foodand their juice has become increasingly available in local grocery stores. Humans benefit from pomegranate, but what about dogs? Can your dog enjoy a pomegranate as a snack? Well, maybe. We did some digging into the research, and it turns out to be a little more complex than a simple yes or no.

These beautiful fall fruits are rich in antioxidants and high in fiber, potassium, folic acid, and vitamin C. That said, eating a large quantity of raw pomegranate may upset your dogs stomach, so its best to provide small bites or better yet, offer dog treats or food enhanced with pomegranate. A recent study has also shown that supplementing a dogs diet with pomegranate peel extract (PPE) can have a positive impact on their overall digestive and gut health.

Dont give your dog raw pomegranate peel, however, as this is difficult to digest. Another promising study showed that pomegranate extract had a positive effect on dogs heart health. Consult your veterinarian if youre interested in supplementing your dogs diet with pomegranate extract, as theyll have the best recommendations for dosage and sourcing.

If your dog does have an adverse reaction to pomegranate, this could cause vomiting, but not much else, and any stomach upset shouldnt last long. Scale1x2x3x 1 pomegranate, seeded 200 grams oat flour (pulverise rolled oats in a food processor to make yourself) 2 eggs OPTIONAL: A dab of red natural food colouring to zazz up the colour OPTIONAL: Some dried pomegranate seeds for a chunky look You may need to add some additional flour if your pomegranate was a biggie to get a workable dough, so have some extra on hand just in case.

We wash the pomegranate to prevent the knife from carrying any surface contaminants through the clean seeds inside. You can turn off the oven and leave the biscuits inside to cool slowly for a crunchier treat.

Can Your Dog Have Pomegranates?

Most veterinary experts say youDogs absolutely require antioxidants in their diet, but tannins, the types found in plants, aren’t necessary for a dog’s overall health. Pomegranates are bursting with tannins, as well as anthocyanins and ellagic acids. The canine body tries to break these down, but the digestive tract is unable to, resulting in a stomach ache or vomiting and diarrhea.The seeds are the part of the fruit that’s most commonly eaten. If you’ve never had a pomegranate, the seeds are the part of the fruit filled with the sweet juices. To extract the juice, you have to crush the seed in your mouth. The seed can be eaten or it can be spit out if you don’t like it.Unfortunately, dogs can’t–or won’t–spit the seed out, and too many of them can cause diarrhea because their stomach and intestines aren’t designed to digest seeds. It’s not uncommon to see the seeds pass through the entire body undigested.

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If you feel like you’re seeing pomegranates popping up everywhere these days, you’re onto something. Though humans have enjoyed the tart taste and health benefits of pomegranates for millennia (fun fact: scholars believe pomegranates were one of the first fruits ever cultivated), now the nutrient-packed fruit is gaining popularity as an ingredient in dog food and treats, too.“Pomegranate is not a common ingredient, but is becoming a more popular trend,” says Dr. Emily Townsend Luisana, veterinarian and clinical nutrition fellow at BluePearl Veterinary Specialty Hospital of the Carolinas.But does that mean the next time you scoop out some delicious, deep red pomegranate seeds, you should offer some to your dog, too? If you’ve ever wondered, “Can dogs eat pomegranates?” or “Is pomegranate safe for dogs?” keep reading to find out if your dog can benefit from this superfruit, too.

Can Dogs Eat Pomegranate?

First, if you’re looking for a clean-cut, yes-or-no answer on whether pomegranates are safe for dogs, a quick anatomy lesson on the fruit will tell you it’s not that simple. Pomegranates contain many different parts, and not all of them may be pet-friendly.“Pomegranate (All parts of the fruit (skin, flesh, and seeds) are rich in polyphenols (compounds packed with antioxidants), which is why you might be interested in sharing some pomegranate with your pup. But not all parts should be eaten.“Although they are technically edible, the skin and flesh are poorly digestible and pose a risk for a digestive tract obstruction,” says Hayes. “The skin can be used in the production of pomegranate extract, which is used in dietary supplements and food. The seeds and juice within the seeds are edible for dogs, although large quantities of seeds can cause digestive upset, and since they don’t break down easily, they can also cause a digestive tract blockage.”Adds Luisana, “The seeds themselves are generally safe in moderation and a good source of naturally occurring antioxidants (such as vitamin C and polyphenols) and fiber.”

Are Pomegranates Bad for Dogs?

There are a number of research studies on the benefits of pomegranates for dogs, which is why you are increasingly likely to find pomegranate or pomegranate extract in dog foods, treats, and canine dietary supplements promoting wellness and joint health. Overall, pomegranate contains antioxidants, which are frequently used in the formulation of dog food and dietary supplements to support health and reduce inflammation, according to Hayes. Here are a few examples of pomegranate’s benefits:Additionally, pomegranate has been suggested as a natural product for use in treating diarrhea and digestive tract parasites. However, there are no good studies evaluating the use of pomegranate for these conditions in dogs, notes Hayes.

What are pomegranates?

Pomegranates come from the Lythraceae plant family. This family is not toxic to dogs, according to the ASPCA. Pomegranate season in North America begins around October and runs through February (just like citrus fruits), which means they’re often incorporated into tablescapes and recipes. The fruit is known for its juicy seeds and superfruit status. It’s full of vitamin C, vitamin K and fiber.

Not fatal for dogs

Technically, the seeds of a pomegranate are not poisonous to dogs the way some other foods are. It would be highly unlikely for your dog to experience organ failure or death after ingesting this fruit. Unlike raisins or grapes, which could lead to kidney failure if eaten in large quantities, pomegranates will usually only cause digestive issues. Chances are your dog will throw up the pomegranate on his own.Similar to acorns, pomegranate seeds contain tannins. Tannins can cause stomach issues in canines that tend to result in vomit and diarrhea. A pomegranate peel is also a choking hazard, so if you’re whipping up some pomegranate ginger apple cider, be sure to toss those peels straight into the garbage.

Pomegranate in dog food

Some dog food brands, like Farmina, incorporate pomegranate into their recipes. Farmina’s Grain-Free Chicken and Pomegranate Dry Food contains dried pomegranate. The Italian company clearly does their research—you can read tons of scientific studies on their website regarding their ingredient choices.In a study not associated with Farmina, pomegranate peel extract was found to promote healthy gut bacteria and digestion in dogs. However, that study only looked at six dogs, hardly a large enough sample size to determine any real data on the fruit’s effect on canines in general.Again, if professionals have formulated a dog food recipe with pomegranates that your pup enjoys and benefits from, go for it! If not, we recommend avoiding the fruit.

Signs your dog has eaten pomegranate

If you suspect your pup stole some pomegranate off your fancy charcuterie board, watch him closely for a few hours. Make sure he has plenty of water (and encourage him to drink it). Chances are he’ll throw up the forbidden fruit on his own. Keep in mind, every dog’s constitution is different. Similar to the way some humans respond well to lactose and others have trouble processing it, some dogs may develop upset tummies after ingesting pomegranate, while others will not.

Benefits of Pomegranate Extract for Dogs

While raw pomegranate seeds or flesh may cause stomach upset for dogs, pomegranate extracts have been studied as potentially very healthy additions to your dog’s diet.A recent study has also shown that supplementing a dog’s diet with pomegranate peel extract (PPE) can have a positive impact on their overall digestive and gut health. Don’t give your dog raw pomegranate peel, however, as this is difficult to digest.Another promising study showed that pomegranate extract had a positive effect on dogs’ heart health. Consult your veterinarian if you’re interested in supplementing your dog’s diet with pomegranate extract, as they’ll have the best recommendations for dosage and sourcing.

Serving Ideas

Whip up a batch of these simple dog treats to get all the health benefits of pomegranate for your dog.

Ingredients

If you can’t bear to part with an entire delicious pomegranate, you can use half a pomegranate, and replace the other half with 180 grams of unsweetened applesauce or pumpkin puree.

Instructions

Preheat oven to 170ºCWash and quarter the pomegranate, and pick seeds out right into the food processor bowl. We wash the pomegranate to prevent the knife from carrying any surface contaminants through the clean seeds inside.Blend the seeds until thoroughly pulverised.Add the oats and pulse to combine.Add the eggs and pulse to combine.Add more flour as necessary to get a workable dough.Turn out onto work surface and roll to a 0.5cm thickness.Cut out and place on a greaseproof-paper lined baking tray.Bake for 20-25 minutes or until just browned around the edges.You can turn off the oven and leave the biscuits inside to cool slowly for a crunchier treat.