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Pooch, Pup or Tail-wagger; some of the many names used for Man’s best friend. These loyal animals have been by man’s side for over 20,000 years. Over time, dogs have evolved into many shapes and sizes but will always hold a place in the heart of many families. Dogs are important members of a family, and their health is taken seriously so that can live a happy and healthy life. A dogs diet is restricted to nutrient rich kibble to maintain health but of course there are those few table scraps in between! This got us thinking… can dogs benefit from berries just like humans do? We went out and found the answers at PawNation.com! Read below to learn about the 3 types of berries dogs can eat…

They also boast high fiber and a lot of vitamin C. Here’s a bonus: Strawberries even contain an enzyme that can help whiten your dog’s teeth. Keep a bag of frozen strawberries in your freezer to make smoothies for yourself, and you’ll also have a crunchy snack on hand for man’s best friend.

What berries are toxic to dogs?

Stay away from cherries, holly berries, juniper berries, baneberries, poke berries, and mistletoe berries. These contain pits and/or chemicals that can be health hazards for your dog. And remember to feed your dogs limited quantities because too much can be bad news!

What berries are dogs allowed?

Blackberries or Brambles (Rubus sp.) ….Black Bryony (Bryonia dioica) and White Bryony (Bryonia alba) ….Dogwood berries (Cornus sanguinea) ….Rose Hips. ….Sloes (Prunus spinose) ….Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna)

Are berries OK for dogs to eat?

Fruits and berries contain vitamins, fiber and antioxidants and tend to be low in sugar, so when fed properly, they ‘re healthy for dogs in the same ways they’re healthy for humans. They’re also comprised largely of water, which makes them refreshing.

What common fruit is poisonous to dogs?

1. Grapes and raisins. The first on our list has to be raisins and grapes. A small amount of this innocuous little fruit so common in our homes can cause irreversible kidney damage and failure quite quickly, depending on the size of dog that ingests them.

It’s not uncommon to want to spoil your dog by sharing table scraps or your favorite people food snack instead of a dog treat. After all, if it is safe for you to eat, it must be OK for your dog to eat, right? Not necessarily. While many people foods are perfectly safe for dogs, some are very unhealthy and downright dangerous, so it’s critical to learn which fruits and vegetables dogs can eat.

They are low in cholesterol and sodium, but because of their high sugar content, bananas should be given as a treat, not part of your dog’s main diet. Blueberries are a superfood rich in antioxidants, which prevent cell damage in humans and canines alike. If your dog eats cherries, be on the lookout for dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, and red gums, as these may be signs of cyanide poisoning. Cucumbers are especially good for overweight dogs, as they hold little to no carbohydrates, fats, or oils and they can even boost energy levels. Just remember, as with most fruits, remove the hard pit first, as it contains small amounts of cyanide and can become a choking hazard. Vets do recommend tossing the peel and only offering your dog the flesh of the orange, minus any seeds. Orange peel is rough on their digestive systems, and the oils may make your dog literally turn up their sensitive nose. Small amounts of cut-up fresh or frozen peaches are a great source of fiber and vitamin A, and can even help fight infections, but just like cherries, the pit contains cyanide. As long as you completely cut around the pit first, fresh peaches can be a great summer treat. A few chunks of pineapple is a great sweet treat for dogs, as long as the prickly outside peel and crown are removed first. They’re low in sugar and calories, but high in fiber, manganese, and vitamin C. Raspberries are especially good for senior dogs because they have anti-inflammatory properties, which can help aging joints. Strawberries are full of fiber and vitamin C. Along with that, they also contain an enzyme that can help whiten your dog’s teeth as he or she eats them. It’s important to remove the rind and seeds first, as they can cause intestinal blockage, but watermelon flesh is otherwise safe for dogs. It’s too tough to be eaten raw, and by the time you cook it down so it’s soft enough for dogs to eat, asparagus loses the nutrients it contains. In addition to vitamins A, B, and C, this crunchy green snack contains the nutrients needed to promote a healthy heart and even fight cancer. Chopped, steamed, raw, or canned – all types of green beans are safe for dogs to eat, as long as they are plain. Onions, leeks, and chives are part of a family of plants called Allium that is poisonous to most pets, especially cats. Spinach is high in oxalic acid, which blocks the body’s ability to absorb calcium and can lead to kidney damage.

Many dog owners wonder which of the foods they commonly consume are also safe to share with their companion. This article discusses whether dogs eating berries is safe. It’ll also look at a few specific berries that make an excellent choice for sharing with your dog and discuss some berries to avoid. Berries can make a great treat for your dog due to their juicy, tart flavor and inherent sweetness that your dog is sure to enjoy. At the same time, many of the same health benefits that berries provide to humans also make them a great choice for dogs.

Because of the presence of fructose, however, excessive consumption of strawberries should be minimized so as to avoid high blood sugar levels in your dog. Although these berries are not generally fatally toxic, consumption of them can result in a number of negative health outcomes or digestive problems and should be avoided. Blueberries, in particular, are often used as a healthy replacement for processed treats due to their small size, low calories, and beneficial properties.

It’s only natural to think our dogs would enjoy the foods we do — especially during summer when nature offers an abundance of delicious summer fruits. Learn which fruits and berries are healthy and safe treats for your dog, as well as how to serve them.

“Treats you feed your dog should make up no more than 10% of his total calories for the day,” Purina Senior Nutritionist Jan Dempsey says. Research shows they are good for humans and some other animals, but whether or not there are benefits for your dog is yet to bet tested,” explains Dempsey. In addition, pretty much every part of the cherry – the stem, the leaves, the tree, the shrub – contain cyanide and is toxic to dogs. Just remember that if you do decide to treat your dog to a peach, be sure to serve it one slice at a time and in moderation. Mangoes are packed with Vitamin A, which is good for eyes, skin and the immune system. They also contain B6, which helps with energy and brain function, and Vitamins C and E, which have great antioxidant properties. Be sure to check ingredient labels for raisins in baked goods as well like biscuits or cookies. Nevertheless, you should always keep a plentiful supply of clean, fresh water available, especially during warm summer months. Call your veterinarian if you notice stomach upset, digestive issues, intense scratching or an increase in thirst.

Fruits Dogs Can and Can’t Eat

The Good Berries

Not all berries are created equal when it comes to feeding them to your dog. In fact, some of the less common berries found in the wild are toxic to dogs and humans. As a rule of thumb, blueberries, strawberries, blackberries, and raspberries are safe for dogs to eat. This, of course, comes with a caveat, which is to introduce berries into your dog’s diet slowly to measure any negative effect on their health. However, that being said, the berries commonly consumed by humans are generally safe for dogs. Although not on this list, cranberries can also be safely consumed by dogs. However, due to their tartness, your dog may not enjoy the taste of a raw cranberry.

Blueberries

Blueberries are one of the most common berries consumed by both dogs and humans, and for good reason. Blueberries have been proven to have a beneficial effect on health. Blueberries are a low-calorie food that is rich in antioxidants. Antioxidants help minimize the effect of free-radicals, which cause damage at a cellular level. Blueberries are also rich in potassium, an essential mineral that plays an important role in your dog’s overall health. Blueberries are also a good source of Vitamin C and fiber, both of which are beneficial to your dog’s health.

Strawberries

Many of the health benefits and nutrients present in blueberries are also present in strawberries. Strawberries are naturally sweet and loaded with fiber, Vitamin C, and antioxidants. Because of the presence of fructose, however, excessive consumption of strawberries should be minimized so as to avoid high blood sugar levels in your dog.

Blackberries and Raspberries

These two related berries are an excellent choice for your canine companion. Blackberries and raspberries are packed with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals that can have a positive health impact on your dog. Blackberries contain Omega-3 fatty acids which can help promote a lustrous, shiny coat. Both berries contain Vitamin K, but blackberries contain more. Blackberries are also higher in sugar, so your dog may be more inclined towards them due to their sweetness.

Can Dogs Eat Fruits And Berries?

It’s only natural to think our dogs would enjoy the foods we do — especially during summer when nature offers an abundance of delicious summer fruits. Learn which fruits and berries are healthy and safe treats for your dog, as well as how to serve them.

First, the 90/10 rule for treats

Feed fruit to your dog like you would any other snack. Keep the portion size small. “Treats you feed your dog should make up no more than 10% of his total calories for the day,” Purina Senior Nutritionist Jan Dempsey says. The other 90 percent should come from a dog food that’s complete and balanced. That said, let’s talk fruit.

Can my dog eat strawberries?

Most definitely! Dogs can eat strawberries. In fact, strawberries have some characteristics and nutrients that may be good for your dog, including:High water content“Strawberries (and some other berries) are known to contain natural compounds that act as antioxidants in the body. Research shows they are good for humans and some other animals, but whether or not there are benefits for your dog is yet to bet tested,” explains Dempsey.

Can my dog eat blueberries and other berries?

Yes! Even though blueberries are probably better for us than for our dogs, you can treat your dog with these tiny, delectable summer berries. They’re also low in calories and sugar, so they’re a feel-good treat.“Raspberries, blackberries and cranberries are also safe options for dogs. Although cranberries can be bitter and in general dogs do not like bitter taste,” Dempsey says. Not all berries are safe for your dog. Some berries with pits can be dangerous for dogs to eat. Always be careful and research any new food before feeding.

Can my dogs eat cherries?

It’s best to stay away from cherries. Cherries have pits, and they’re just the right size to cause problems for dogs. In addition, pretty much every part of the cherry – the stem, the leaves, the tree, the shrub – contain cyanide and is toxic to dogs.If you want to remove a little bit of the ripe cherry flesh and give it to your dog, that’s okay. But, it can seem like a lot of trouble for a very tiny treat.

Can my dog eat peaches?

Yes, your dog can have peaches. Just be sure to thoroughly remove the pit. The pit contains cyanide, which is harmful to your dog.Peaches do contain Vitamin A, which is good for eyes, skin and immune health. Just remember that if you do decide to treat your dog to a peach, be sure to serve it one slice at a time and in moderation.

Can my dog eat mangoes?

Only if you pit the mango to avoid choking and any harm to your dog’s digestive tract. Once you do that, a mango can be a wonderful summertime snack. Mangoes are packed with Vitamin A, which is good for eyes, skin and the immune system. They also contain B6, which helps with energy and brain function, and Vitamins C and E, which have great antioxidant properties. If you’re peeling and cutting up mango for yourself, feel free to give a slice to your dog. However, like any other fruit, mangoes should be served as a treat, under supervision.

Can dogs eat grapes and raisins?

Absolutely not! While they may seem harmless, grapes and raisins are a huge no-no for dogs. Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure and should be avoided as a treat for your dog. Be sure to check ingredient labels for raisins in baked goods as well like biscuits or cookies.

Fruits in general

Fruits and berries contain vitamins, fiber and antioxidants and tend to be low in sugar, so when fed properly, they’re healthy for dogs in the same ways they’re healthy for humans. They’re also comprised largely of water, which makes them refreshing. Nevertheless, you should always keep a plentiful supply of clean, fresh water available, especially during warm summer months.

3 Tips for serving fruits to dogs

“Wash and clean fruit for your dog just like you would for your family,” Dempsey says. Washing helps rinse away dirt and residual chemicals.Make fruit even easier to eat. Cut into small bits or puree – mashing works well, too. For larger dogs, serve by the slice or whole berry.“Some dogs might not know what to do with the new texture of fruit. So, you can try feeding them as frozen treats,” says Dempsey. Whatever way you serve them, start out slowly. Call your veterinarian if you notice stomach upset, digestive issues, intense scratching or an increase in thirst.