Can Chickens Eat Cherries?

Fruits are filled with vitamins and other important nutrients and cherries are among the most delicious ones but can chickens eat cherries? There are several varieties of cherries and you will see that chickens are interested in most of them but does this mean that allowing them to eat this fruit is a good idea? Let us find out together!

All of these facts add to the treat of a choking hazard that the pits pose and if you put these to risks into balance with the benefits of cherries it is understandable why many chicken owners are worried.

Are cherry seeds bad for chickens?

Cherries typically have pits in them. As you can imagine, they’re a choking hazard. … Some people say that the chickens don’t chew the cherry pits up, so they cannot release the chemicals. However, if you want to be on the safe side you should avoid feeding them with cherry pits.

What fruits are toxic to chickens?

Fruit Pits/Seeds: Apple seeds, and pits in fruits such as apricot, cherry, peach, pear, and plums contain the toxin cyanide. These fruits are generally fine to offer to your chickens as treats, so long as the pits have been removed.

Can chickens eat choke cherries?

Not all cherries are safe for chickens. The sour cherry provides a great source of vitamins, but the chokecherry, for example, can cause trouble for your chickens. The fleshy part is safe to eat, but almost every other part of it is toxic to chickens. … Cherry pits contain traces of cyanide.

Can chickens eat wild cherries?

Yes, chickens can eat cherries and they LOVE them ! Plus cherries are a healthy chicken snack for them to eat. Just be careful to not give them too much at once because the high sugar content can be dangerous for their blood sugar levels.

You love your chickens and you want them to not only be healthy but you also want them to be happy. What better way to make them both than to give them tasty, healthy treats like cherries. But, can chickens eat cherries?

There is a bit of fear out there that cherries can be poisonous because the pits contain small amounts of cyanide. While cyanide is obviously harmful, it is not a clear and present danger for your chickens.

This is not a huge danger because chickens will typically peck around the pit and only eat the flesh of the cherry. They contain a wide variety of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that are vital to a chickens health and wellbeing. Vitamin A: growth and reproduction Antioxidants: an abundance of benefits to fertility, in vivo, embryo development, postmortem meat, etc.

Anthocyanins: anti-inflammatory as well as other pharmacological benefits Boron: bone and egg quality b-vitamin complex: metabolism & energy (Thiamine, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine, Cyanocobalamin) Calcium: bone and eggshell Choline: fat metabolism in the liver Vitamin E: neurological function Iron: anemia Vitamin K: helps with blood clotting and protects against coccidiosis Magnesium: prevents perosis Melatonin : regulates feed consumption and the brains biological clock plus and many other benefits Potassium: nerves and muscles Chicks are experiencing a period of rapid growth and need a fairly specific diet to meet their nutritional needs. If your animals are eating dried and dead leaves that have fallen to the ground, they will be perfectly fine.

The same for is they eat healthy green leaves or even the bark of the cherry tree. The times when the leaves can be toxic are when they are wilting and still hanging from the tree. Under normal circumstances, the two components are stored in separate tissues, but can become poisonous inwilted cherry leaves.

The cherry blossoms, unlike the wilting leaves, pose no threat of poisoning to your chickens. You dont have to worry about them eating any pits or choking on a full sized cherry. You can do this by carefully slicing the cherry in half with a knife and removing the pit, by hand.

They also sell devices called pitters that make this a little easier and less messy. Whole Chickens are completely capable of safely eating cherries without your help. From The Tree Simpler yet, you can skip the part where you even pick the cherries.

Boredom Buster If you want to not only give them a healthy snack but also a bit of entertainment, you can make a toy out of it. Just run a needle and thread or fishing line through the center of several cherries and make a whole string of them. That isnt inherently bad, it just means that they should only consume fruit in small amounts to avoid spiking their blood sugar and becoming hyperglycemic.

This can be a bigger problem with many dried fruits; cherries being one of the exceptions. Dried fruit has considerably less moisture so the sugar content is much more concentrated. Too much sugar in these forms can cause digestive issues and even, in some cases, death.

Vegetables & Gourdes Veggies do not have the same quantities of sugar as fruit. The tanic acid present in acorns and oak leaves can lead to vomiting, diarhea, and possibly death. Apple seeds: the cyanide in them can be toxic to your chickens candy: the refined sugar in candy is even worse than the sugar content in dried fruit dry beans: contain phytohaemagglutinin which is toxic.

jam, jelly, or preserves: just like candy; too much sugar content pesticides: dont give your chickens poison raw/green potato peels or skins: green potato skins contain solanin; a toxin.

Personally, I hate guavas, but my chickens are rather partial to them. I was a little concerned that they might find the pips difficult to digest, but a few guavas a day seems to be doing the flock the world of good.

Watching them peck away at guavas made me wonder what other fruits chickens enjoy, and which they can safely consume. Written by Amy Fewell with a foreword by Joel Salatin, this book teaches you how to hatch your own chicks, prevent and treat common chicken ailments, start a poultry business, cook delicious recipes with your fresh eggs, and much more.

The seeds, bark, twigs, and leaves all release cyanide when digested , causing disaster in the chicken coop . Not only do most species of cherry have anti-inflammatory properties , but they also contain a variety of vitamins that can boost your chickens egg production capabilities and keep their digestive tracts operating effectively. Far more dangerous than cherries with pits, apples with their pips still in contain much higher levels of cyanide and could easily wipe out your backyard flock.

Similarly, the Jerusalem Cherry belongs to the Nightshade family and can cause a loss of appetite, a weak heart rate, and breathing troubles. Im lucky enough that my chickens have access to a variety of different fruits that help to supplement their diets during wintertime when there are fewer bugs and grubs for them to enjoy. I doubt Im going to rush out and buy my chickens a punnet of cherries for breakfast but, should an abundance of berries come my way, Ill happily share them with my feathered friends.

There are many ways that chickens bring their owners joy. One of those ways could be their great love for food. Its fun to see them go crazy for treats, and its astonishing to see them demolish it within minutes!

As a general rule, its good to thoroughly wash any fruit or vegetable you bought from the store. The skin or anything exposed might not be unhealthy for the chickens, but it might have a chemical coating.

You can let your chickens have the leaves as long as youre not giving them the wilted ones. Because of this, some chicken handlers have decided to stay away from the leaves. I usually steer clear from treats that need to be in a particular state to be safe for chickens.

If you want to give your chickens cherry leaves, make sure to check if theyre still in a healthy shade of green! Read more about cherry leaves, cyanide, and their effect on livestock here . People in the poultry world are not united in their view of the pits.

The pits do have a harmful substance for the chickens, but you need a large amount for it to take effect. Some are simply being extra careful and steering clear of toxic elements. Chickens generally dont even like the pits.

Many handlers say that when they give their chickens the whole cherry, the seeds get left behind. Overall, you dont have to go out of your way to give your chickens the pits and stems. Pecking once or twice at the pits and stems wont hurt your chickens.

Generally, chickens go crazy for the flesh and skin and stay away from the pits, stems, and leaves. This way, there would be less mess in the run if they dont like the new snack. So, cherries can be a good treat, but they cant be a staple in the diet of your chickens.

The general rule is that the chicks can eat what the chickens can. Remember, chicks should mostly stay on starter feed at least until the 6th week. Cherries could be a great addition to the summer treats of your chickens.

Giving them hydrating treats will surely help with the summer heat. Since the cherry doesnt have tons of calories, its one of the best summer treats if you have any overweight chickens on your run. You might want to chill them before giving them to your chickens to maximize the refreshing effect!

Watermelons This fruit holds a large amount of water and renders all its parts safe to eat. Again, you might want to chill these treats to optimize their refreshing effect on your chickens. If youre looking for more high water content treats, then you might want to check this list out.

Cherries are pretty much safe to eat, but if you want to keep a healthy chicken on your land, you might want to consider these things. Every part of the cherry is safe to eat, but some portions are safer than others. Chickens would most likely only go crazy over the flesh and skin.

Nutritional Value

Around 82% of the raw cherry is water and the next ingredient is carbohydrates at 16%, while one percent is comprised of proteins and a very low amount of fat. The dietary fiber is one of the most important benefits and cherries also contain many vitamins such as vitamin C, A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, K and folate.The minerals you find in them are calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, sodium and zinc. All of these can benefit your chickens and there isn’t anything to harm them so overall the pulp of the fruit will be a good addition to their diet. They even love eating the cherry blossoms that fall from the trees in spring!

Sour Cherries and Wild Cherries

Sour cherries have a higher content of vitamin C and A but aside from that the rest of the composition is similar. Thus they are safe for chickens and the same is true of wild cherries which are considered to have even more benefits but are a bit more bitter in their taste.

Pits

There is something that is discussed often about many fruits and that is if the pits are safe for chickens or other animals. It is common knowledge that they contain small amounts of cyanide and that substance is highly toxic for animals or humans. The thing is that they have to eat a very high quantity for it to reach a lethal dose, but it does linger in the body for a long time so it can accumulate over time.All of these facts add to the treat of a choking hazard that the pits pose and if you put these to risks into balance with the benefits of cherries it is understandable why many chicken owners are worried.The truth is that chickens often just take the part of the fruit that they enjoy and might leave the pits on the ground if they just get a cherry that has fallen from the tree. If you feed them cherries with pits they might eat the center too but there isn’t any threat of them choking as you will soon discover.

Can Chickens Eat Cherries?

Yes, chickens can eat cherries and they LOVE them! Plus cherries are a healthy chicken snack for them to eat. Just be careful to not give them too much at once because the high sugar content can be dangerous for their blood sugar levels.

Are Cherries Poisonous To Chickens?

Technically, yes, but practically, no. Let us explain.There is a bit of fear out there that cherries can be poisonous because the pits contain small amounts of cyanide. While cyanide is obviously harmful, it is not a clear and present danger for your chickens.It is the pit, and not the actual cherry, that contains cyanide. Your chicken would not only need to eat the pit and digest it, but they would need to eat a large quantity in order for the cyanide to have any effect.This is not a huge danger because chickens will typically peck around the pit and only eat the flesh of the cherry. In instances where they do consume the pit, most often, they just pass it with no issues.

Can Baby Chicks Eat Cherries?

Yes, they most definitely are healthy. They contain a wide variety of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that are vital to a chicken’s health and wellbeing. Some of these nutrients, as well as their health benefits, include:

Can Ducks Eat Cherries?

For the most part, poultry will have the same nutritional needs. There are some exceptions but in this case, yes, ducks can eat cherries.

Can Chickens Eat Cherry Tree Leaves?

Cherry tree leaves, like cherry pits, can also contain cyanide. This means that they can be harmful when consumed by livestock. That includes cows, goats, horses, and, yes, even chickens.However, not all leaves are dangerous. If your animals are eating dried and dead leaves that have fallen to the ground, they will be perfectly fine. The same for is they eat healthy green leaves or even the bark of the cherry tree.The times when the leaves can be toxic are when they are wilting and still hanging from the tree. Here’s an explanation as to why from Michigan State University:

Can Chickens Eat Cherry Blossoms?

Absolutely! The cherry blossoms, unlike the wilting leaves, pose no threat of poisoning to your chickens. The will likely, be drawn to their bright colors and other insects that also like the blossoms.

Can Chickens Eat Wild Cherries?

Yes. Wild cherries do not pose a health risk to your chickens.

Can Chickens Eat Sour Cherries?

Yes. Just like wild cherries, sour cherries are perfectly fine for chickens to eat. In fact, the only difference between the two are the amounts of Vitamin C and Vitamin A. Sour cherries have a slightly higher concentration.

How To Feed Your Chickens Cherries

There are a variety of ways that you can feed cherries to your chickens. Some of them are:

Dried

Probably the most worry free method of feeding cherries to your chickens is to give them to them dried. You don’t have to worry about them eating any pits or choking on a full sized cherry.

Pitted

Pitted cherries obviously remove the dangers around choking. You can do this by carefully slicing the cherry in half with a knife and removing the pit, by hand. They also sell devices called pitters that make this a little easier and less messy.

Whole

Chickens are completely capable of safely eating cherries without your help. Generally, they will just peck around the pit and just eat the cherry. So, if you want, you can just give them whole cherries.

From The Tree

Simpler yet, you can skip the part where you even pick the cherries. Build their run around a cherry tree and they will pick up all the excess cherries that fall on the ground.

Snack Blend (Chicken “Trail Mix”)

If you want to make a special treat for your chickens you can make a special chicken snack mix or “chicken trail mix”. To do this you give them even ratios of dried cherries, crushed oyster or egg shells, and dried meal worms.

Boredom Buster

If you want to not only give them a healthy snack but also a bit of entertainment, you can make a toy out of it. Just run a needle and thread or fishing line through the center of several cherries and make a whole string of them.Then, hang the string somewhere your chickens can get to it and they will have a blast pecking at them while the cherry string swings around. It’s also pretty funny to watch and a form of entertainment for yourself.

Quick Tips For Chicken Treats

We get a lot of questions about the various types of things that chickens can and cannot eat. Here are some of our recommendations.

What Fruits Are Safe For Chickens?

We all just assume that fruits and veggies are always super healthy. For us, that is mostly true. We have larger bodies and different metabolic rates. For chickens, things work a bit differently.Fruit has a lot of glucose, aka sugar. That isn’t inherently bad, it just means that they should only consume fruit in small amounts to avoid spiking their blood sugar and becoming hyperglycemic.This can be a bigger problem with many dried fruits; cherries being one of the exceptions. Dried fruit has considerably less moisture so the sugar content is much more concentrated.Too much sugar in these forms can cause digestive issues and even, in some cases, death.
– Apples (not the seeds)– Bananas– Cantaloupe– Cherries– Currants– Peaches– Pears– Watermelon

Vegetables & Gourdes

Veggies do not have the same quantities of sugar as fruit. However, they still should be given in moderation.
– Pumpkin– Tomatoes (even though the are technically a fruit)

Berries

Chickens can’t get enough of berries. In fact, it’s always a race on whether we get to harvest our blackberries or if they do.Seriously though, berries, like fruit, contain a large amount of fruit and should be given sparingly. If your chickens get to your blackberry bushes before you do, it’s not likely to be a problem split between the flock.
– Mountain Ash Berries– Mulberries– Raspberries– Rowan Berries
Both elderberries and gooseberries can be deadly if your chickens eat them.

Can Chickens Eat Cherries?

Yes, but some parts are safer than others. You don’t have to worry. We will tackle each part.For now, let’s talk about the flesh.The flesh is one of the safest parts of the fruit. You would need to be a little careful with the other portions, but not with this part. The only precaution you have to worry about with this part is the common concerns.Now, let’s talk about the other parts.

Can Chickens Eat the Cherry Skin?

You don’t have to peel the cherries. Your chickens can eat the skin.The cherry skin is also safe to eat. You might want to give it a good wash if it is from the store. As a general rule, it’s good to thoroughly wash any fruit or vegetable you bought from the store. The skin or anything exposed might not be unhealthy for the chickens, but it might have a chemical coating. It is those things that could be harmful to your chickens.

Can Chickens Eat the Cherry Leaves?

Here’s where the cherry gets a little complicated as a treat. Chickens can eat the leaves, but there are some precautions to be taken.You can let your chickens have the leaves as long as you’re not giving them the wilted ones. The wilted leaves contain cyanide. As we all know, this substance is harmful! Because of this, some chicken handlers have decided to stay away from the leaves.I also steer clear from leaves, but that is a personal preference. I usually steer clear from treats that need to be in a particular state to be safe for chickens. Again, it’s a personal preference. If you want to give your chickens cherry leaves, make sure to check if they’re still in a healthy shade of green!Read more about cherry leaves, cyanide, and their effect on livestock

Do Chickens Like Cherries?

Generally, chickens go crazy for the flesh and skin and stay away from the pits, stems, and leaves.It is important to remember that chickens have different preferences. Don’t be surprised if your chickens don’t like the cherries you give them. There are dozens and dozens of cherries. It is likely that if they don’t develop a liking for one type, they would probably like another.You can throw your chickens a few cherries to see if they like it. It’s always a good idea to see their reaction to a new treat first. This way, there would be less mess in the run if they don’t like the new snack.

Are Cherries Good for Chickens?

We know the chickens could eat the fruit. We also know that most of them like it. Now, let’s see if it’s good for them.Cherries have a lot of good things in them. They also don’t have a lot of unhealthy elements in them. For one, cherries have vitamin A and calcium. Furthermore, it doesn’t have many calories and sodium. Win-win!However, cherries do have a large amount of sugar. Also, it doesn’t have all the nutrients the chickens need. So, cherries can be a good treat, but they can’t be a staple in the diet of your chickens.
If you want to see more of the nutritional value of the cherry, then you can go

Can Chicks Eat Cherries?

Since we already talked about the adults, let’s not forget about the little ones!The general rule is that the chicks can eat what the chickens can. So, yes! The chicks can eat cherries. You only need to be a little careful.Even if you’re letting your chickens have the pits, you would have to take them out for your chicks. Take into account the size of your chicks. The seeds could be a choking hazard for them.However, like with adults, limit the cherries you give them. Remember, chicks should mostly stay on starter feed at least until the 6th week. After that, you can introduce more treats to them.

Cherries for the Summer

Cherries could be a great addition to the summer treats of your chickens.This fruit holds a lot of water. As you might already know, chickens need more water during the summer. Giving them hydrating treats will surely help with the summer heat.Since the cherry doesn’t have tons of calories, it’s one of the best summer treats if you have any overweight chickens on your run.You might want to chill them before giving them to your chickens to maximize the refreshing effect!

Cherry Cautions

It’s never too early or too late to prepare for the summer! Here are a few treats you might want to consider:Again, you might want to chill these treats to optimize their refreshing effect on your chickens.If you’re looking for more high water content treats, then you might want to check this