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Potatoes in any cooked form are a great nutritional source of various vitamins, proteins, and fiber for humans. But is it safe to give potatoes to your cat? Are they good or bad?

Some high quality dry or wet cat foods offer not only meat, but also plant-based ingredients such as oils and other vegetable by-products. However, when your kitty comes pleading for a spoonful of your frozen yogurt, a chunk of your chocolate , or a bit of your tasty bag of chips, how can you say no to that precious furball’s hungry stare? This chemical acts as a defense mechanism for the growing potato plant and is poisonous to all humans and animals, including felines. So, if you’re keeping raw potatoes in your home make sure they’re out of your cat’s reach for safety purposes, otherwise you may find yourself rushing to your vet’s office. A small bite of mashed sweet potatoes won’t hurt your kitty, but if you serve it as an occasional treat, it may result in obesity, digestive problems, and other health-related issues including vomiting and diarrhea. However, you should always remember that the cooked potato treats must be rid of harmful spices and herbs, artificial additives, and toppings. A treat or two of sweet potatoes or fried chips won’t harm your feline pal if it’s a one-time thing, but it can be fatal in the long run.

Are potatoes toxic for cats?

Potato toxicity can be fatal. If your pet has ingested parts of a raw potato or potato plant, including peelings, contact your veterinarian immediately. Your veterinarian may instruct you to induce vomiting, however, do not induce vomiting unless instructed to.

What happens if cats eat potatoes?

Green, uncooked, and/or raw potato peels contain solanine which can be toxic to cats. Solanine is a natural defense mechanism of the potato to protect it from being eaten. Ingestion of solanine in cats can cause vomiting, diarrhea, and sometimes affect the nervous system causing lethargy and disorientation.

Can cat eat french fries?

The occasional French fry isn’t going to do your healthy cat much harm, as long as that French fry isn’t covered in salt and sauce! But your cat also won’t get much nutritional benefit from it either. Raw potatoes waiting to be made into French fries are another issue and shouldn’t ever be fed to your cat.

What can cats not eat?

Onions and Garlic. ….Raw Eggs, Raw Meat & Bones. ….Chocolate and Caffeinated Drinks. ….Alcohol and Raw Dough. ….Milk and Dairy Products. ….Grapes and Raisins. ….Dog Food. ….Preventing Cats from Eating Dangerous Foods.

Do you wish that your cat had more of a varied diet? Perhaps you look at their endless bowls of cat food and think they must be bored with eating the same thing every day. The truth is that nutritionally complete cat food gives your feline friend everything that they need in terms of nutrients. But that doesn’t mean they can’t enjoy a bit of variety. The key is knowing what is—and what isn’t!— safe to feed them as a treat. So, what about potatoes?

Additional seasoning and salts are also not healthy for a cat, and may even lead to gastrointestinal problems like diarrhea or vomiting. Potatoes are a starchy carbohydrate, which means they provide lots of energy as well as nutrients like iron, magnesium and potassium, and vitamins C and B6. Larger chunks will be hard for your cat to digest and may get stuck the gut, potentially causing a blockage. Remember that a cat can be sensitive to any new food in their diet , so the best plan is to start by offering a small amount of cooked, mashed potato. If your cat likes it and doesn’t have any vomiting, diarrhea, or other symptoms of an unhappy gut, you can continue to offer it more regularly.

When gathering with loved ones to celebrate the holidays, for many of us, it seems natural to want to include our pets in our holiday traditions as well.

While it’s important for our pets to be part of the family, this shouldn’t include sharing in the holiday feast. Sharing your table scraps with your cat can lead to a number of health issues, including obesity and pancreatitis . These processes add hefty amounts of salt, pepper and herbs to the meat, making it less safe for pets to consume. Turkey skin is particularly fatty, and if cats eat it as a scrap, it can lead to pancreatitis, a potentially life-threatening condition in which the pancreas becomes inflamed. Unlike humans, cats don’t have a sweet tooth and cannot tolerate sugary foods. Because most cats become lactose intolerant after weaning, dairy can cause unpleasant symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea and gas. As for gravy, this tasty topping tends to be high in fat and contains potentially toxic seasonings, such as onion and garlic. This side dish usually contains milk and brown sugar, making it too rich for a cat’s digestive tract. Onions, like all Allium members, can cause fatal red blood cell damage in cats. You should also beware of the extra ingredients commonly added to this dish, including salt, pepper and butter. However, nearly all cats are intolerant of dairy in their diet, so the cheese can lead to diarrhea, gas and abdominal pain. This iconic Thanksgiving dessert gets its rich, custardy taste from sweetened condensed milk, which adds heavy amounts of sugar and dairy. Even small amounts can cause alcohol poisoning, a dangerous and potentially fatal condition for our furry family members. One of the most popular alcoholic drinks of the holiday season, eggnog, also contains raw eggs, cream and nutmeg—all of which are poorly tolerated or toxic to cats. However, cats have sensitive digestive systems that cannot tolerate a lot of human food ingredients.

Cat owners commonly wonder about the toxicity of various human foods. The question about the safety of different foods increased after learning that certain foods were toxic which yielded a lot of press coverage. The most important toxic foods to cats are onions, garlic, chocolate, alcohol, and excessive amounts of fish.

A potato, also known as a tater or spud, is a round to oblong food that is classified botanically as a root vegetable. They can vary in size from small and round to large and oblong with soft thin skin. Although cooked potatoes are considered safe, any food can cause gastrointestinal upset in cats. Potatoes are prepared hundreds of ways including baked, mashed, diced, or as chips. When researching the safety and danger of potatoes for cats, there are a couple of considerations. Green, uncooked, and/or raw potato peels contain solanine which can be toxic to cats. Solanine is a natural defense mechanism of the potato to protect it from being eaten. Pancreatitis or gastrointestinal upset can occur in cats that aren’t used to potatoes or those cooked with seasonings and butter. Too much oil, fat, or seasoning can lead to gastrointestinal upset or pancreatitis. Although uncommon, cats that have exposure to gardens and eat the leaves can develop gastrointestinal upset and potential blockage. Cats are generally fairly discriminating in their eating habits and this is a rare problem.

So, can cats eat potatoes?

Yes and no.It actually depends on the type of potatoes and the way they are cooked. For example, cats are quite intolerant towards sweet potatoes. French fries also pose threats to your kitty’s digestive system. And raw potatoes are absolutely lethal to cats.Let’s review the various types of potatoes and the way they benefit or harm your feline furball.

1. Raw potatoes

Raw potatoes can be just as poisonous for cats as they are for humans.The raw potato plant contains the toxic chemical solanine. This chemical acts as a defense mechanism for the growing potato plant and is poisonous to all humans and animals, including felines.Apart from being present in the plant, this chemical can also be found in the green skin of the ripening potato vegetable. Thus, raw potatoes and the peelings of a raw potato are absolutely lethal to your kitty.So, if you’re keeping raw potatoes in your home make sure they’re out of your cat’s reach for safety purposes, otherwise you may find yourself rushing to your vet’s office.

2. Sweet potatoes

Sweet potatoes, even green plants, don’t have the solanine chemical. The ASPCA has labeled the sweet potato vine as non-toxic to felines.Nevertheless, the sweet potatoes can lead to various health-related issues when it comes to cats. Felines have more difficulty digesting potatoes than humans do, and the nutritional values of sweet potatoes aren’t as beneficial to cats as they are to humans.High quality cat food offers all the beneficial nourishment cats require, so you don’t need to treat your feline furball with potatoes to give it additional nutrients.A small bite of mashed sweet potatoes won’t hurt your kitty, but if you serve it as an occasional treat, it may result in obesity, digestive problems, and other health-related issues including vomiting and diarrhea.

Potential benefits

Potatoes are a starchy carbohydrate, which means they provide lots of energy as well as nutrients like iron, magnesium and potassium, and vitamins C and B6.But just because they’re healthy, doesn’t necessarily mean your cat will enjoy potatoes. And even if they do, they can get these nutrients from their usual complete cat food or other, more appropriate sources.

The risks of raw potatoes

Potato peel that is green, unwashed, and uncooked may contain high levels of the toxic compound solanine. Solanine is found naturally in potato peel as a deterrent to stop scavengers digging potatoes up and eating them. Since solanine is toxic to cats, it could lead to poisoning symptoms such as vomiting or diarrhea. If you think your cat might have eaten raw potato peelings, you should always contact your veterinarian immediately.Raw potato poses another risk. Larger chunks will be hard for your cat to digest and may get stuck the gut, potentially causing a blockage. It is therefore very important that you never feed your cat raw potato, peeled or not.

What about cooked potato?

The method of cooking and seasoning is important.

What about sweet potato?

Sweet potato is not toxic to cats, but it can cause digestive upset. It’s very high in natural sugars and fiber, which can cause vomiting and diarrhea. Like white potatoes, sweet potatoes should never be fed raw to cats.

So, how can I feed my cat potato safely?

The safest way to feed your cat potato is to ensure the potatoes are washed, peeled, cooked, and prepared without cooking fats. Therefore, boiling would be a good, safe cooking method. Finely chopping the potatoes before cooking or mashing after cooking are both good ways to ensure that there are no large pieces that might be a choking hazard or cause a blockage in your cat’s gut.Remember that a cat can be sensitive to any new food in their diet, so the best plan is to start by offering a small amount of cooked, mashed potato. If your cat likes it and doesn’t have any vomiting, diarrhea, or other symptoms of an unhappy gut, you can continue to offer it more regularly.

Dangerous Human Foods for Cats During the Holidays

Holiday dishes in particular feature foods that are dangerous or toxic to cats. These are some people foods that you should keep away from your cat during the holidays.

Seasoned Turkey Meat and Skin

While plain, cooked turkey is relatively safe for pets to eat, holiday recipes usually call for the turkey to be brined or seasoned. These processes add hefty amounts of salt, pepper and herbs to the meat, making it less safe for pets to consume.Turkey skin is particularly fatty, and if cats eat it as a scrap, it can lead to pancreatitis, a potentially life-threatening condition in which the pancreas becomes inflamed.Also, turkey bones pose a choking hazard for pets and can cause an obstruction in the intestine.

Stuffing

Most stuffing recipes contain onion, scallions or garlic, all of which belong to theVegetables within theOther consequences of allium poisoning include vomiting, diarrhea and nausea.Many stuffing recipes also include raisins, which (along with grapes) are highly toxic to cats.

Cranberry Sauce

This popular holiday condiment is either served straight from the can or homemade from a recipe. To reduce the tartness of the berry, cranberry sauce recipes typically call for large quantities of white sugar, and the canned sauce usually contains high-fructose corn syrup.Unlike humans, cats don’t have a sweet tooth and cannot tolerate sugary foods. Excess sugar can also lead to obesity, diabetes and dental disease.

Mashed Potatoes and Gravy

When eaten in small amounts, plain-cooked potatoes are not harmful to pets. However, the ingredients used to make mashed potatoes put cats at risk of gastroenteritis.Mashed potato recipes usually call for some form of dairy, such as milk, butter or cheese. Because most cats become lactose intolerant after weaning, dairy can cause unpleasant symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea and gas.As for gravy, this tasty topping tends to be high in fat and contains potentially toxic seasonings, such as onion and garlic.

Sweet Potato Casserole

While cooked, plain sweet potatoes can be a great treat for cats, sweet potato casserole is strictly off-limits.This side dish usually contains milk and brown sugar, making it too rich for a cat’s digestive tract.If the casserole is topped with marshmallows and pecans, these ingredients add even more sugar and fat. (Did you know that a single, regular-sized marshmallow contains 4 grams of sugar?)Cats cannot readily digest nuts, so large pieces can cause a blockage in the intestine.

Green Bean Casserole

It’s true that plain green beans can be an excellent treat for pets. But green bean casserole is a no-go.This holiday classic gets its creamy flavor from a dairy-based sauce. Most green bean casserole recipes are also rich in onions—both within the casserole and added as a crispy French onion topping.Onions, like all

Candied Yams

Candied yam recipes are often passed down through generations, but this traditional side item is another one to keep away from your cat.The dessert-like dish gets its name from the rich helpings of brown sugar, butter and marshmallows that make it oh-so-sweet.Cats can’t handle such high levels of sugar and fat, so avoid letting your cat lick your plate of candied yams.

Corn on the Cob

A plain, cooked corn kernel or two is not a hazardous treat for cats. However, you should never feed corn on the cob to your kitty. Corn cobs present a choking risk and could lead to intestinal obstruction if consumed.You should also beware of the extra ingredients commonly added to this dish, including salt, pepper and butter.

Macaroni and Cheese

The ultimate comfort food, macaroni and cheese is a holiday favorite for many families.However, nearly all cats are intolerant of dairy in their diet, so the cheese can lead to diarrhea, gas and abdominal pain.

Pumpkin Pie

What holiday feast is complete without pumpkin pie? This iconic Thanksgiving dessert gets its rich, custardy taste from sweetened condensed milk, which adds heavy amounts of sugar and dairy.Even switching out the sugar for an artificial sweetener is not good, as some artificial sweeteners (like xylitol) are highly toxic to pets.One of the most common flavors added to pumpkin pie is nutmeg, which is also highly toxic to cats.

Eggnog

All alcohol should be completely off-limits to pets. Even small amounts can cause alcohol poisoning, a dangerous and potentially fatal condition for our furry family members.One of the most popular alcoholic drinks of the holiday season, eggnog, also contains raw eggs, cream and nutmeg—all of which are poorly tolerated or toxic to cats.