Can Bunnies Eat Cilantro?

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Others are genetically predisposed to disliking cilantro if youre one of these individuals, you might think that this popular herb tastes like soap! Luckily, were not here to chat about our own food preferences; instead, were talking cilantro for rabbits.

Our quick guide to cilantro for rabbits has the answers youve been searching for. Even though cilantro isnt high in calories, it is a good source of antioxidants and interestingly, it has been studied for its ability to help remove toxins from the body. Cilantro can help your bunny get over a case of mild indigestion if theyre a bit bloated after eating cabbage, broccoli, or another cruciferous veggie that can cause gas.

Most rabbits love cilantro, and good news: They can have quite a bit of it on a fairly regular basis. Great news for bunnies who enjoy flavorful treats cilantro is something thats fun to nibble, on its own or added to mixed greens. Even though cilantro is good for rabbits, youll want to introduce it slowly instead of offering it all at once.

Go ahead and give your rabbit about half the recommended amount and watch for signs of diarrhea over the next 24 hours. If alls well, you can give your bunny rabbit the entire serving of cilantro the next day. This doesnt mean that you have to offer cilantro on a daily basis; if youd rather provide other treats, feel free!

In nature, wild rabbits happily nibble cilantro if they can find it, but that doesnt mean it should make up the majority of your bunnys diet. Fresh hay A rabbits natural diet consists mostly of grass, which keeps the digestive system moving. Fresh hay should be available at all times, even though your rabbit can technically survive on bunny food alone.

Allowing your bunny to nibble rabbit-safe hay is one of the easiest ways to ensure that your rabbits teeth wear down correctly rather than becoming overgrown. Rinse and refill your rabbits drinking bottle at least once each day. All-natural treats including vegetables and a tiny bit of fruit.

Offer very small amounts of fruit no more than about a teaspoon per two pounds of your rabbits body weight. Chewable objects need to be available at all times, as your rabbits teeth are constantly growing and chewing keeps them at the right length. Give your bunny items such as rabbit toys, hay cubes, coconut shell, untreated softwood branches, or unbleached loofah to ensure good dental health and help prevent the boredom that can occur in an enclosed habitat .

Taking a few minutes to look for information about the foods youre considering is the best way to ensure that your rabbit stays safe and healthy. For now though, giving your rabbit cilantro is a fantastic way to add a bit more flavor to their day. While you want to provide the recommended amount to prevent potential issues, cilantro can help your rabbits digestion by easing excess gas.

Make sure your bunnys food is fresh and always remove wilted items to prevent this problem. Dehydrated cilantro can be a nice addition to your bunnys food, particularly when sprinkled on other veggies such as cucumber or bell pepper.

Is cilantro safe for rabbits?

Some herbs are safe for rabbits, and many are found in local stores or backyard gardens. These include basil, oregano, parsley, dill, cilantro, caraway, rosemary, sage, tarragon, lavender, peppermint, lemon balm, comfrey and clover.

What foods are toxic to rabbits?

Avocados..Chocolate..Fruit seeds/pits..Raw onions, leeks, garlic..Meat, eggs, dairy..Broad beans and kidney beans..Rhubarb..Iceberg lettuce.

What herbs are safe for rabbits?

Basil..Coriander..Dill..Mint..Parsley..Oregano..Rosemary..Sage.

Bonkers salad consists of romaine, cilantro, parsley (which im going to reduce now!) and sometimes chard (if my mom cooks with it hehe). My mother is mexican, so she always has all kinds of herbs in the house to cook with. She recently brought home a dry hibiscus flower named “jamaica” (like the country) that we use to make a drink (agua fresca, it means fresh water). I read that bunnies can eat hibiscus flowers so I gave Bonkers a tiny bit to try and he loved it! I would like to top his salad with it sometimes but I havent because Im not really sure if its safe for him. Does anybody know about it?

You love your rabbit. We love our rabbits, Fish and Chips. And we love giving them the best foods and treats we can. When we first got Fish and Chips, one of the first greens we bought was some fresh coriander, which they loved eager to devour it. It complemented their main diet of Timothy hay well (why Timothy? Find out here). Great, lets get some more herbs from the local supermarket any will do, we thought. After all, cant rabbits eat every type of herb? Big mistake.

If youre like me, you want to be able to wander down the vegetable aisle, pick up a pack of fresh herbs, and feel relaxed that your bunnies will be safe and enjoy the treat. Basil Coriander (also called Cilantro) Dill Fennel Lavender Mint Mustard Oregano Parsley Rosemary Sage Tarragon Thyme Watercress.

You also need to be careful with younger rabbits their digestive systems are delicate, and they need time to adjust to new foods in their diet. Rabbits can eat parsley safely as part of a sensible diet mainly based on hay. Some people suggest that you need to be careful with how much parsley and fresh mustard you give your rabbit.

However, this would require feeding your rabbit exclusively parsley (instead of hay) over a long period of time. So long as parsley is not the major part of the diet (this should always be hay), its fine to give your rabbit some. For example, if you check out the PDSA advice on safe foods to give your pet rabbit, it includes parsley.

However, while parsley has higher calcium levels than some other foods, it isnt particularly out of the ordinary (figures taken from this Rabbit Welfare Association article) : Your rabbit would need to eat about 10 small packets (30g amount 1 oz) of fresh parsley in a day merely to reach the recommended daily allowance. Rabbits can eat thyme safely as part of a sensible diet mainly based on hay.

Rabbits can eat cilantro (coriander) safely as part of a sensible hay based diet. The herb is an excellent addition to give variety to your rabbits diet, helping ensure their nutrition is balanced. Rabbits can eat rosemary safely as part of a sensible diet mainly based on hay and fresh water.

Rosemary is a great herb to give to rabbits, providing variety to their diet and helping to ensure that they have a balanced nutrition. Some rabbits dislike strong smelling herbs, so dont worry if your bun turns up their nose. If your bunny does like rosemary, you can be happy knowing that it will provide your rabbit with vitamin A and potassium, along with some fibre.

Rabbits can eat sage safely as part of a varied diet mainly based on hay and fresh water. While modern medicine doesnt consider sage a miracle drug in the way that the past might have, its still a great herb for your bunny to eat. Some people like foraging if thats you, its probably best to decide on four or five plants that you recognise and know are safe, and collect them.

If you go searching on internet forums, youll end up with all sorts of conflicting advice about diet, and what foods are bad or good for your bunny.

Coriandrum sativum, cilantro, coriander, dhania, or Chinese parsley is a popular herb (leaves or stalk) and spice (roots and seeds) with a tart, lemony taste native to southern Europe, all the way to North Africa and Southwestern Asia.

It belongs to the family Apiaceae that has other aromatic flowering plants such as celery, dill, fennel, caraway, cumin, parsley, or carrots. However, like other rabbit safe herbs such as oregano, mint, lemon balm, basil, dill, rosemary, thyme, and sage, they have a strong taste or spicy flavor.

When offering this herb to your bunnies, sprinkle a small amount of chopped fresh cilantro leaves or stalks on their green mixture. On the other hand, bunnies need at most 2-5% fats or oils, and excessive amounts can result in obesity, hepatic lipidosis, aorta atherosclerosis, and so on. While they may like it, dont be tempted to feed these pets an excessive amount of coriander or replace it with their regular diet as it is low in fiber, something that may cause stomach upsets, diarrhea, and GI stasis.

Finally, dont forget to provide the right rabbit diet , which should have unlimited grassy hays like timothy, 10-15% fresh foods with a majority being leafy greens, and about 5% pellets.

Can Rabbits Eat Cilantro?

Cilantro adds a touch of fresh flavor to a variety of foods and lots of people really love it.Others are genetically predisposed to disliking cilantro – if you’re one of these individuals, you might think that this popular herb tastes like soap!Luckily, we’re not here to chat about our own food preferences; instead, we’re talking cilantro for rabbits. Can rabbits have cilantro? If so, how much can they eat at once?
There’s more to the story though so keep reading. Our quick guide to cilantro for rabbits has the answers you’ve been searching for.

Cilantro Nutritional Facts

If you like cilantro, you’ll be happy to know that you can nibble as much as you like.

Can Rabbits Have Cilantro?

Yes, in fact it’s one of the best herbs to offer a bunny!

Is Cilantro Good For Rabbits?

Cilantro can help your bunny get over a case of mild indigestion if they’re a bit bloated after eating cabbage, broccoli, or another cruciferous veggie that can cause gas. The nutrients in cilantro are good for your rabbit’s health, too!

Do Rabbits Like Cilantro?

Yes! Most rabbits love cilantro, and good news: They can have quite a bit of it on a fairly regular basis.

How Much Cilantro Can A Rabbit Eat?

Great news for bunnies who enjoy flavorful treats – cilantro is something that’s fun to nibble, on its own or added to mixed greens.
Even though cilantro is good for rabbits, you’ll want to introduce it slowly instead of offering it all at once. Go ahead and give your rabbit about half the recommended amount and watch for signs of diarrhea over the next 24 hours.If all’s well, you can give your bunny rabbit the entire serving of cilantro the next day.

How Often Can A Rabbit Eat Cilantro?

Your rabbit can have a little bit of cilantro every day along with other greens. This doesn’t mean that you have to offer cilantro on a daily basis; if you’d rather provide other treats, feel free!

Is cilantro safe for rabbits?

Yes, in fact it’s one of the best herbs for rabbits! While you want to provide the recommended amount to prevent potential issues, cilantro can help your rabbit’s digestion by easing excess gas.

Can cilantro make my rabbit sick?

Although cilantro is generally very good for rabbits, there’s a chance that your rabbit could become ill if they ate far too much cilantro at once, or if they ate spoilt cilantro. Make sure your bunny’s food is fresh and always remove wilted items to prevent this problem.

Can rabbits eat parsley?

Rabbits can eat parsley safely as part of a sensible diet mainly based on hay. You can feed an adult bunny a handful of parsley as their daily allowance of greens.Some people suggest that you need to be careful with how much parsley and fresh mustard you give your rabbit.This is because parsley (along with some vegetables, like spinach) contains a relatively high level of a type of chemical called oxalates (you can see a table of the amount of oxalates in different vegetables here).Oxalic acid, inSo long as parsley is not the major part of the diet (this should always be hay), it’s fine to give your rabbit some. For example, if you check out the PDSA advice on safe foods to give your pet rabbit, it includes parsley. It’s also on the approved list from the Royal Veterinary College.I have also seen worries about whether the amount of calcium in parsley is too high for rabbits. Rabbits process calcium differently from most other animals, and too much calcium can lead to a variety of problems including urinary stones.However, while parsley has higher calcium levels than some other foods, it isn’t particularly out of the ordinary (figures taken from this Rabbit Welfare Association article):This means that parsley has a calcium content of 0.17%. In contrast, Timothy hay typically has a calcium content of 0.4% – over twice as high – and your rabbit is going to eat far more hay than parsley.Your rabbit would need to eat about 10 small packets (30g – amount 1 oz) of fresh parsley in a day merely to reach the recommended daily allowance.So you shouldn’t be concerned about the calcium content of parsley or other green vegetables unless your vet has recommend a specific diet for specific problems. (See also this article on calcium levels in various foods – the main takeaway is that you are far more likely to give too much calcium with pellets, and that it’s extremely difficult to give too much calcium with sensible amounts of green herbs).And parsley contains a variety of other useful minerals and minerals. In particular, parsley is a good source of vitamin A and iron, both of which rabbits need in their diet. Find out more about the minerals and vitamins that rabbits need here.The bottom line? As is often the case, parsley, like other foods, is fine in moderation.

Can rabbits eat thyme?

Rabbits can eat thyme safely as part of a sensible diet mainly based on hay.I have seen some suggestions on the web that thyme can be helpful if your rabbit has diarrhoea. Whilst it may be true, I could find no evidence to back this up. More importantly, if your rabbit has diarrhoea, consult a vet straight away.

Can rabbits eat cilantro / coriander?

Rabbits can eat cilantro (coriander) safely as part of a sensible hay based diet. You can feed both the stem and the leaves of coriander to bunnies. The herb is an excellent addition to give variety to your rabbit’s diet, helping ensure their nutrition is balanced. A handful of cilantro / coriander is about a serving for a mature rabbit.Cilantro (coriander) is a great source for bunnies of vitamin K, copper, potassium and iron. We have a detailed post if you’re interested in finding out more about the nutritional needs of rabbits.In fact, coriander is our bunnies’ favourite herb. When we give our rabbits a handful, they gobble it down.

Can rabbits eat rosemary?

Rabbits can eat rosemary safely as part of a sensible diet mainly based on hay and fresh water. You can feed both the stalk (sprigs) and the leaves to bunnies. Rosemary is a great herb to give to rabbits, providing variety to their diet and helping to ensure that they have a balanced nutrition. A handful (a few sprigs) is a portion for a day for a mature rabbit.However, not all bunnies will like rosemary. Some rabbits dislike strong smelling herbs, so don’t worry if your bun turns up their nose.If your bunny does like rosemary, you can be happy knowing that it will provide your rabbit with vitamin A and potassium, along with some fibre.

Can rabbits eat sage?

Rabbits can eat sage safely as part of a varied diet mainly based on hay and fresh water. You can feed bunnies both the leaf and stem of sage. Sage is a source of potassium, iron and vitamin K to rabbits. A portion size is a handful of leaves.Sage has a historical reputation of being a healing herb – in mediaeval times, it was also known as ‘sage the saviour’ (Salvia salvatrix), and to the Romans it was the holy herb. Sage was used to treat everything from the plague to wasp stings.While modern medicine doesn’t consider sage a miracle drug in the way that the past might have, it’s still a great herb for your bunny to eat.

What about wild herbs?

I’m not an outdoor type, so I wouldn’t particularly recognise wild herbs if I came across them anyway. I get my herbs from the supermarket. But I found this list of plants to avoid. Some people like foraging – if that’s you, it’s probably best to decide on four or five plants that you recognise and know are safe, and collect them.

Why are some herbs dangerous for rabbits?

Chives are dangerous for rabbits because they can lead to gut problems and blood problems.Along with other plants in the onion family (An oxidising substance called n-propyl disulphide binds to the sides of red blood cells, is recognised as a foreign body by other cells, so the red blood cell is destroyed.Seek out professional advice from a vet if your rabbit eats chives or anything similar.Humans are much less sensitive to this than other animals, which is why we can enjoy chives and garlic, and our pets can’t.

Conclusion

Most herbs, including parsley, are safe for our bunnies. Fish and Chips love the various green herbs that we give them, along with other greens, as part of their diet. We get small packets regularly from our supermarket. They provide nutrients and flavours for our pet rabbits.If you’re giving a sensible amount as part of a diet mainly based on hay, you don’t need to worry about oxalate content or calcium content – so parsley is fine along with all the others on the safe list. But make sure that you avoid chives – they are dangerous for your rabbit.As you care about your bunny’s diet, check out our page on what fruit you can safely give your rabbit as a treat (and how much), and our page on why Timothy hay is so good for your rabbit.You can also check out more about what vitamins and minerals rabbits need for a healthy life.If you want to make sure you can always afford the best care for your rabbit, check out our page on pet rabbit insurance here.

Can my rabbits eat cilantro?

While some rabbits will enjoy nibbling cilantro, others may have some reservations. When offering this herb to your bunnies, sprinkle a small amount of chopped fresh cilantro leaves or stalks on their green mixture. Dried cilantro leaves are also safe. However, most rabbits tend to ignore them.Besides leaves and stems,However, like any other seeds, nuts, or grains,High carbs diets will overload your rabbit’s cecum microflora, something that may result in enteritis, stomach troubles, diarrhea, or cause obesity being highly calorific.On the other hand, bunnies need at most 2-5% fats or oils, and excessive amounts can result in obesity, hepatic lipidosis, aorta atherosclerosis, and so on.

Is cilantro good for rabbits?

Safety alone isn’t a sufficient reason to feed any food to your bunnies. You deserve to know if coriander is good or not. If this is your concern, the answer is simple. Yes. Cilantro is right for your bunnies since it is nutrient-rich, i.e., fresh cilantro leaves are an excellent source of vitamins A, C, and K.Also, it has a considerable amount of riboflavin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin E, as well as minerals like iron, manganese, and potassium. Bunnies require all these nutrients.Besides being nutritious, it will add variety, introduce a new taste and texture to their diet. Please don’t stick to the same foods every day as they will get bored.Furthermore, coriander also has antimicrobial properties that aid in fighting some infections and foodborne diseases. It also has antioxidants like quercetin, terpinene, and tocopherols that will fight free radicals, some cancers and boost immunity.In humans, it will help in aiding digestion, boosting appetite (coriander extract), lower heart disease risks. Additionally, it will support brain health by countering diseases associated with inflammation like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and multiple sclerosis.Finally, it is beneficial to our skin, and its seeds and oil extract may help lower blood sugar, among many other benefits.

Feeding coriander to your bunny

As already mentioned, only give your bunnies a small measure of cilantro leaves or stalks. Even humans don’t use a lot of any herb or spice. Go for fresh ones and mix or sprinkle them with other leafy greens. Avoid wilted or those with molds.Secondly, thoroughly wash them under running water to get rid of any remnant farm chemicals. Going for organic coriander is a wise choice as they are free of pesticides or herbicides that may harm your furry friend.Thirdly, begin with a small amount and see how their tummies react after a day. Discontinue and revert to usual diets if they cause stomach upsets, gas, or diarrhea (loose stool). Otherwise, you can gradually increase the amount.While they may like it, don’t be tempted to feed these pets an excessive amount of coriander or replace it with their regular diet as it is low in fiber, something that may cause stomach upsets, diarrhea, and GI stasis. Fiber plays a vital role in ensuring a healthy gut and motility.Finally, don’t forget to provide the right rabbit diet, which should have unlimited grassy hays like timothy, 10-15% fresh foods with a majority being leafy greens, and about 5% pellets. Keep treats (commercial bunny treats, safe fruits, or non-leafy veggies) at no more than 5% of their total food intake.