Boxer Mastiff Mix Puppy?

Looking for a dog that has a little less energy than a Boxer, but a little more size? Let us introduce you to the Boxmas! The Boxmas is a mixed designer breed, also known as the Boxer Mastiff mix. This handsome pup is not yet recognized by the American Kennel Club. But even though its a newer mixed breed, its become quite popular in the designer dog circuits.

The Germans recognized his powerful and great guarding abilities but wanted him to be more agile and slender in frame. The Boxer as we know him today is strong with an innate work ethic, he is intelligent and loyal, as well as loving and is known to have a silly streak!

Julias Caesar took specimens of the English Mastiff back to Rome and used them as gladiators to fight against men, lions, and other beasts in the arena. The English Mastiff is known for being a couch potato and loves nothing more than cuddles on the sofa with his master, be warned though, he isnt bothered that he is the largest dog in the world, and if he fits he sits! Slightly more active than their Mastiff parent, the Boxmas is still an evenly tempered dog.The Boxmas parents both have an impressive history , full of fighting and guarding tales, but more recently known to make great family pets who are a little more affectionate and loving than their ancestors.

From falling over his large paws to bouncing around on the family trampoline, he is the class clown, and everyone will love him! It is important to note that with any mixed breed he can take on either of his parents appearances, but typically the pup is known to have the Mastiff frame with the Boxer face . Expect that youll need to spend at least 60 minutes a day outdoors exercising your pup.The Boxmas is energetic and exuberant.

This could be through activities like playing frisbee or visiting dog agility courses, for him to expel all that steam. Puzzle toys with treats in them are great for mental stimulation and will keep him entertained for ages. Due to their large size it is important not to over-exercise your pup at a young age as it will place strain on his rapidly growing joints .

Because of the Boxmas protective nature , it is important for him to regularly interact with humans and animals outside of the family unit. As he is an intelligent dog and he continuously seeks praise from his master, he is relatively easy to train. Hip Dysplasia : This is an abnormality with the joints and can eventually cause crippling lameness in the limbs and painful arthritis, particularly in larger dogs.

Symptoms can include retching without throwing up, excessive drooling, or a rapid heart rate to name but a few. Be sure to conduct your own research on this for an extensive list of problems and symptoms, as it is likely this condition will affect the Boxmas and you will need to know how to regulate it. Keep treats to a minimum when they are not being used for training, as at 100 pounds, the extra weight is something this dude and his joints could do without!

Single coats require less grooming as they dont shed as excessively in the summer or winter months. The Boxmas is a unique breed, so make sure you do your research and talk to both local breeders as well as online information groups to find the best pup.

Are Boxer mixes aggressive?

Though most Boxer dogs are fine with other family pets, including the family cat, quite a few Boxers are dominant or aggressive toward other dogs of the same sex, and some are cat chasers. … Boxers are stubborn, yes, but also sensitive and proud.

Are mastiff mixes good dogs?

The St. Bernard Mastiff mix dogs are excellent watchdogs with an innate loyalty to their owners. They also have a calm disposition. The St. Bernard Mastiff mix puppies weigh about 50-60 pounds.

How much does a Boxer mastiff weigh?

Boxer / Mass

White Boxers are genetically possible but strongly discouraged because of the health risks associated with a white coat, including hearing and sight loss.

The modern Boxer originated in Munich, Germany in the late 19th century. The Mastiff breeds history can also be dated back to 2500 B.C., when they were hunters and war dogs throughout the mountains of Asia.

The modern Mastiff originated in 14th century Britain as guards to castles and estates, big game hunters, and war dogs. Breeders from Canada and the United States helped revitalize the breed. As breed mixes continue to develop, there is a debate about their health versus those of purebred dogs.

Purebred dogs are thought of as unhealthy due to years of selective breeding and dwindling genetic pools. However, a 2013 study from scientists at UC Davis examined genetic disorders in purebred and mixed dogs. A Boxer Mastiff pup inherits physical features from both parents.

Boxers are medium-sized, standing 21.5 to 25 inches tall and weighing 65 to 80 pounds. Forehead wrinkles appear when a Boxers ears are perked up. This combined with their large, dark brown eyes give Boxers a sense of expressiveness.

The breed standard doesnt include an upper limit to their height. His head is proportionately huge with a short, broad muzzle that is dark in coloration. The lips hang down loosely, giving the appearance of jowls.

Forehead wrinkles and dark eyes lend to their expressive face. A mix of the two breeds results in a dog larger than the Boxer itself. A Boxmas might weigh between 65 and 160 pounds and stand up to 36 inches tall.

Responsible breeders are cautious not to breed dogs with undesirable temperaments. This can lead to aggression, but early socialization and training can prevent this issue. Slow introductions and early socialization can help this issue.

Similar to Boxers, Mastiffs are protective of their family and can be wary of strangers. Youll need to train it not to jump on strangers, and to be careful around smaller animals and children. However, a Boxmas may get bored during training sessions like his parent breeds are known to.

Short, variable training sessions are beneficial to keep him interested. Training helps your massive pup learn to be gentle with others. This may lead to wariness of strangers (humans and animals) and potentially aggression.

A Boxmas may be active and energetic, but his large size tires him out easily. Owners should not over-exercise puppies or youngsters, or allow them to jump from high places. Their large size makes them susceptible to injury and strain on their growing joints.

A mixed breed dog can inherit health issues from his parents, and a Boxmas is no exception. Lets examine common health issues with each parent breed. While the breed is generally considered healthy, the gene pool has been reduced over the years.

However, youll still want to be aware of any breathing, eye, dental or temperature control issues with the parent dogs. A Boxer Mastiff mix is at risk from inheriting any of the disorders listed above. Responsible breeders screen potential parents for inheritable disorders to protect the health of future generations.

Hip dysplasia Hyperthyroidism AS/SAS Cardio Aortic valve disease ARVC Cardiomyopathy Degenerative myelopathy Regular veterinary checkups, proper care, exercise and a loving home ensures your Boxmas lives a healthy life. A quick brushing once or twice a week keeps a Boxmas coat healthy and shiny.

A Boxmas likely needs a low-protein dog food with a proper calcium/phosphorous ratio because it inherits the Mastiffs immense size. Check with a veterinarian to ensure you are providing the proper nutrient ratios. Youll also want to avoid free feeding to monitor how much your Boxmas is eating.

A Boxmas is be a great family dog , if you dont let his large size get in the way. The only exception is when their massive bodies bump into or jump up on smaller kids or frail adults. A Boxmas is naturally protective of your family and make a good guard dog.

Make sure your family is ready to commit to the training, socialization and care that a Boxmas needs. Many rescue dogs do not have a full health or behavioral history. But the shelter or foster owner theyre with should be able to give you a detailed insight into their health and personality now.

If you dont mind some unknowns, then rescuing is a great option. There are not currently specific Boxmas rescue organizations, but youll find them for each parent breed. An internet search brings up plenty of Boxmas breeders to select from.

They have a history of improper health care and breeding practices, and puppies are not typically kept in sanitary conditions. When considering a breeder, visit the premises and ask for health screening results. Dont be afraid to ask questions to ensure you are getting a healthy and well-cared for puppy.

It is vital to start puppy training and socialization very early with a Boxmas. Cons: Very large size
Extensive training and socialization
Vulnerable to health disorders Pros: Great with children
Loyal and protective
Smart and fun-loving

This very large dog requires extensive exercise, training and care.

Aside from enjoying what I do, I love seeing the looks on the owners faces whenever they see their pets in a good state, as well as when I treat them. Another priceless moment was when I had the chance to treat almost a hundred dogs (or more) and talk to the owners. With this, I firmly believe that dogs, just as humans do, deserve a family that loves them, a roof above their heads, and friends that keep them company throughout their lives.

Coming from a medium and large sized pair of breeds, the Mastiff Boxers turn out quite big and muscular, which deems them as intimidating and scary, especially for strangers. WeightMales: 160-230 pounds; Females: 120-170 poundsHeightUp to 36 inches tallSizeVaries from medium to mostly large, but larger than a regular Boxer breedCoat TypeMedium to dense, single coatCoat ColorWhite, brown, black, brindle, apricotAmount Of SheddingVariable to highEyesBrownNoseBlackEarsUpright, medium lengthTemperamentCalm, RelaxedLife Expectancy10 to 12 yearsHypoallergenicNoKid FriendlyYesNew Owner FriendlyYes, but with a proper introductionBreed RecognitionNoThe Mastiff Boxer mix is a gentle giant that is popular among households because of the great built and even temperament.

Just as any dog, you Boxer mixed with Mastiff should not be left alone because this makes them restless and agitated which results to them chewing on things big and small. A local breeder is ten times better because unlike online ads or pet stores, they care and love for the puppies they produce. In line with finding a good breeder, make sure you ask to visit the kennel and check the area and space they have for producing hybrids.

A hybrid will generally manifest all good traits from the parent breeds, but it doesnt mean there are no health concerns you should take note of and check. Always make sure to visit the vet even when your boxer mastiff mix doesnt show any signs or symptoms to ensure that they are 100% healthy and thriving. Avoid giving your Boxmas foods rich in common allergens such as corn, soy, dairy, wheat, and potatoes.

To give your Boxer crossed with Mastiff better nutrition, check the following high quality and nutrient-packed dog food available on the market: Taste Of The Wild High Prairie Puppy Formula: To ensure your hybrids proper growth and muscle development, this brand focuses on the elevation of protein constituents coming from lamb, chicken, and buffalo meals. Protein and fat levels are lower compared to different brands in the market but still packed with needed nutrients and vitamins to ensure proper growth and development.

Your hybrid came from two lean and muscular breeds that have a slim built, so its best to help them maintain their weight and let them serve their original purpose: to watch, guard, and protect. Fulfill their need to stay fit by choosing a home that has adequate running space if you plan to adopt a Boxmas. Creators are confident your Boxmas wont tire quickly with this product because it also hastens their hunting skills when searching for the ball.

Nylabone Big Chew Durable Toy Bone For Large Breeds : This is a product that ensures your dog wont drool all over the place as well as take care of the needed oral hygiene. Before you allow your Boxmas to interact with family members (especially children), ensure that youve undergone socialization training to avoid wariness and fear . You may visit the vet and ask for tips on how to improve your hybrids social skills, and most likely theyll advise you to go to the park and let them play with other dogs and let them get used to seeing strangers daily.

Parent Breeds

As the Boxmas is relatively new his history is

Boxer

The Boxer was established in Germany in 1895 and is thought to have been bred from the now extinct Bullenbeisser. The Bullenbeisser was a powerful and larger dog used to hunt bull and wild boar, in English this literally translates to “Bull Biter”. The Germans recognized hisThe Boxer as we know him today is strong with an innate work ethic, he is intelligent and loyal, as well as loving and is known to have a silly streak! The Boxer currently ranks as the 12It is thought that the Boxer is named due to the way in which he uses his front limbs to play and defend himself, almost like a boxer does. They are extremely popular as the parent of several different boxer mixes. The Boxer is also popular when mixed with a lab,

English Mastiff

The English Mastiff, originated from England and is one of the oldest known dog breeds. Julias Caesar described the Mastiff during the invasion of Britain inThe English Mastiff is more friendly and docile than his ancestors, but he is stillThe English Mastiff is known for being a

Boxmas

Being a mix of the English Mastiff and the Boxer, the Boxmas is a genuinely family-friendly pup, that has a little bit more of a stubborn streak when it comes to listening. They areThey are usually on the larger side, so it’s best if you have a little bit of space for them to stretch out and roam around your yard. Provided you can accommodate these things, the Boxmas can be an

Temperament

The Boxmas’ parents both have anThe Boxmas is energetic and fun-loving and he is known to beWhen he is not playing, he will be on guard duty and although he isDue to his protective, but patient nature, the Boxmas has a reputation for being

Size & Appearance

The Boxmas stands tall and can grow up toYou can expect your Boxmas to reach anywhere from

Coat & Colors

His coat is short, dense, and water-resistant, and can come inHe has short-length hair that is very thick and dense and will stick to absolutely everything in your home, but as the saying goes, no outfit is complete without a little dog hair! Daily brushing not only keeps his hair and skin healthy, but also removes any dead hair cells and promotes blood circulation.

Exercise & Living Conditions

The Boxmas is energetic and exuberant. Therefore he needs high levels of exercise. If you can’t provide him with this, then the Boxmas is probably not for you. He will need at leastAs well as general exercise he will also need high-intensity playtime and interaction with his humans. This could be through activities like playing frisbee or visiting dog agility courses, for him to expel all that steam. Maybe you could even try his paw at a bit of boxing! His English Mastiff parent may be a bit of a couch potato, but this lil’ Boxmas pupper certainly is not!On top of his exercise, because he is an intelligent dog, he will also needDue to their large size it is important not to over-exercise your pup at a young age as it will place strain on his

Training

The Boxmas parents have shared guarding and protective traits. This means it’s important that the Boxmas is socialized from a young age.Because of the BoxmasAs he is an intelligent dog and he continuously seeks praise from his master, he is relatively easy to train. Be sure to make the training sessions short and fun, though, as he can get bored and distracted easily.

Health

As this guy is a mixed breed, he can inherit health problems from either parent, however, the Boxmas appears to be another

Grooming

The Boxmas has a chance to be a single or double-coated dog. Mastiffs have double coats, and Boxers have single coats. So depending on which parent your pup takes after, you may end up with a Boxmas that looks like either. Generally speaking, they take after their Boxer parent’s coat a bit more, so this means a single coat. Single coats require less grooming as they don’t shed as excessively in the summer or winter months.Expect to groom your Boxmas about the same amount all year. The Boxmas can have sensitive skin, so we caution against using shampoos or soaps with harsh chemicals.

Breeders & Puppy Costs

The Boxmas is a newer designer dog, but there are breeders out there. You’ll need to do your research to find reputable breeders online. You can expect to pay around

Rescues & Shelters

Because the Boxmas is a mix, it’s quite likely you may get lucky and find one at a local rescue or shelter. While breeding the Boxmas is becoming a more popular thing to do, you’ll definitely find pups that may have come from unwanted litters. These dogs are likely to end up in a Mastiff Rescue center, strictly because of their size. It’s possible you may also see them at a Boxer rescue facility, but some facilities may shy away from the larger size of the Boxmas. We always encourage you to Adopt before you shop!

Boxer Dog History

The Boxer breed’s history can be traced back to 2500 B.C. to the war dogs of the Assyrian empire.The modern Boxer originated in Munich, Germany in the late 19th century. It descended from the Bullenbeisser, a popular big-game hunter.Several breeding crosses throughout the 1800s resulted in the Boxer known today.Boxers served as war dogs in both World Wars. They’re also excellent athletes, cattle dogs, police dogs and guide dogs.

Mastiff History

The Mastiff breed’s history can also be dated back to 2500 B.C., when they were hunters and war dogs throughout the mountains of Asia.The modern Mastiff originated in 14th century Britain as guards to castles and estates, big game hunters, and war dogs.Mastiffs served in both World Wars, but the breed barely survived WWII with only an estimated 14 Mastiffs remaining.Breeders from Canada and the United States helped revitalize the breed.

Boxer Mastiff Mix History

As with most modern mixed-breeds, the Boxmas’ history is not well known. It’s believed that the mix recently originated in Europe.

Purebred vs. Mutt Debate

As breed mixes continue to develop, there is a debate about their health versus those of purebred dogs.Mixed breed dogs are assumed to be healthier.Purebred dogs are thought of as “unhealthy” due to years of selective breeding and dwindling genetic pools.However, a 2013 study from scientists at UC Davis examined genetic disorders in purebred and mixed dogs.They found that this assumption is not always true.When selecting a puppy, knowing the health history of both parents—purebred or mixed—informs you of potential health risks.A thorough look at this debate can be found here.

Boxer Mastiff Mix Appearance

A Boxer Mastiff pup inherits physical features from both parents.

Boxer Appearance

Boxers are medium-sized, standing 21.5 to 25 inches tall and weighing 65 to 80 pounds.A Boxer’s body is sleek and muscular.His jaw is broad and square with a slight underbite. The muzzle is blunt and wrinkly.Forehead wrinkles appear when a Boxer’s ears are perked up.This combined with their large, dark brown eyes give Boxers a sense of expressiveness.

Mastiff Appearance

A Boxer’s coat is very short and smooth. Coat coloration may be brindle or fawn. Markings include:White Boxers are genetically possible but strongly discouraged because of the health risks associated with a white coat, including hearing and sight loss.

Mastiff Coat and Coloration

A Mastiff has a double coat. Both coat layers are short and dense.It may be apricot, brindle or fawn in coloration. Markings include a black face mask.

Boxer Mastiff Appearance

The parent breeds differ greatly in size. A mix of the two breeds results in a dog larger than the Boxer itself.A Boxmas might weigh between 65 and 160 pounds and stand up to 36 inches tall.His eyes and nose is dark, like both parents.The Boxer Mastiff’s coat is short and straight.A Boxmas’ coloration varies but can take on any color of the parent breeds, with the exception of white and apricot.It might have markings like the parents, but that is hard to predict.

Boxer Mastiff Mix Temperament

A Boxmas’ temperament depends on his parents.Responsible breeders are cautious not to breed dogs with undesirable temperaments.

Boxer Temperament

Boxers are energetic and playful. They’re friendly and patient with children.Because they were bred as guard dogs, Boxers are protective.This can lead to aggression, but early socialization and training can prevent this issue.Other dogs, especially of the same sex, can make a Boxer nervous.Slow introductions and early socialization can help this issue.

Mastiff Temperament

Although their massive size can be intimidating, Mastiffs are good-natured dogs.They’re described as “courageous” and “dignified.” They are also patient and gentle with children.Similar to Boxers, Mastiffs are protective of their family and can be wary of strangers.Early training and socialization are very important to this breed.

Boxmas Temperament

A Boxmas likely has the pleasant temperament of his parent breeds. He is active and fun-loving.A Boxmas makes an excellent guard dog. Caution should be taken around new animals and strangers.A Boxmas’ large size may be intimidating, but it is playful.You’ll need to train it not to jump on strangers, and to be careful around smaller animals and children.Early socialization and training are essential to ensure a good-natured Boxmas.

Training Your Boxer Mastiff Mix

Training is absolutely necessary for a Boxmas. His parent breeds are intelligent and learn quickly.However, a Boxmas may get bored during training sessions like his parent breeds are known to.Short, variable training sessions are beneficial to keep him interested.A Boxmas is large and powerful. Training helps your massive pup learn to be gentle with others.Our Dog Training Guides assist you in successfully training a Boxmas.

Guarding Nature for Boxer Mastiff Mix

A Boxmas instinctually wants to guard his family.This may lead to wariness of strangers (humans and animals) and potentially aggression.This is one reason why early socialization is so important for this mixed breed.A Boxmas may be active and energetic, but his large size tires him out easily.Walks and playtime in an open space use up some of that energy. A young Boxmas has a lot of energy.Owners should not over-exercise puppies or youngsters, or allow them to jump from high places.Their large size makes them susceptible to injury and strain on their growing joints.

Boxer Mastiff Mix Health

A mixed breed dog can inherit health issues from his parents, and a Boxmas is no exception.His immense size can contribute to health risks as well.Let’s examine common health issues with each parent breed.

Mastiff Health Issues

While the breed is generally considered healthy, the gene pool has been reduced over the years. This is the case with many purebred dogs.Boxer dogs are prone to the following health issues:In addition, the Boxer’s shortened muzzle may cause brachycephalic syndrome symptoms.They are less at risk than breeds with even shorter muzzles.However, you’ll still want to be aware of any breathing, eye, dental or temperature control issues with the parent dogs.

Grooming and Feeding Your Boxer Mastiff Mix

A Boxer Mastiff mix is at risk from inheriting any of the disorders listed above.Responsible breeders screen potential parents for inheritable disorders to protect the health of future generations.The Canine Health Information Center and parent breed clubs recommend the following screening tests for potential parent dogs:Boxer Health Testing Recommendations:Mastiff Health Testing Recommendations:

Rescuing a Boxer Mastiff Mix

Rescuing a dog is a wonderful way to find a companion.Many rescue dogs do not have a full health or behavioral history.But the shelter or foster owner they’re with should be able to give you a detailed insight into their health and personality now.If you don’t mind some unknowns, then rescuing is a great option.There are not currently specific Boxmas rescue organizations, but you’ll find them for each parent breed.You might even find a mix at one of these organizations.

Finding a Boxer Mastiff Mix Puppy

An internet search brings up plenty of Boxmas breeders to select from.Our Puppy Search Guide helps you select a responsible breeder and make sure your puppy is healthy.We don’t recommend purchasing a puppy from pet stores or puppy mills.They have a history of improper health care and breeding practices, and puppies are not typically kept in sanitary conditions.When considering a breeder, visit the premises and ask for health screening results.Don’t be afraid to ask questions to ensure you are getting a healthy and well-cared for puppy.

Raising a Boxer Mastiff Mix Puppy

Raising a puppy has adorable and frustrating moments.Our Puppy Care Guides contain information to help you through this stage.A Boxmas might experience a long puppyhood. A Mastiff doesn’t mature until about 3 years of age.You’ll have a large puppy with a lot of energy. It is vital to start puppy training and socialization very early with a Boxmas.