Blue Tick Hound Puppy?

Is a blue tick hound a good family dog?

This breed is smart and has a friendly, loyal disposition. … However, this breed belongs in an active home where there is plenty of access to explore the outdoors. Bluetick Coonhounds can be wonderful companions and great family dogs when properly trained and socialized.

How much is a blue tick hound puppy?

What’s the Price of Bluetick Coonhound Puppies? These dogs are widely used throughout the United States for hunting purposes. For this reason, they are usually easy to find and can be inexpensive. If you’re looking for a pet-quality animal from a decent breeder, you can expect to pay about $500-$600.

Are blue tick hounds affectionate?

Personality: Originally bred for hunting; kind with children. They are loving, gentle, and good with small children — most of them love children! They are very affectionate, and can take all the petting you can dish out.

The sleekly beautiful Bluetick Coonhound is a sweet and affectionate charmer who might enjoy snoozing in the shade, but in pursuit of quarry he is relentless, bold, and single-minded. His off-the-charts prey drive must be channeled.

Fast and muscular, the Bluetick Coonhound dog breed stands out for their striking coat. They have a pleasantly pleading expression and a big bawl mouth meaning they have a long, drawn out bark. Although theyre a hunter first and foremost, the Bluetick can be a fine housedog and loves their people.

Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.

The Bluetick should have the appearance of a speedy and well-muscled hound. Although more strongly built than some other coonhounds, this breed should never be clumsy nor overly chunky in build. The legs are moderately angulated and well muscled, allowing for good speed, agility and endurance. The wide nostrils allow air and scent in, and the deep muzzle allows for more scenting receptor area. The coat is short and medium coarse, providing protection from brambles. In motion he carries his head and tail well up. The distinctive loud bawl allows the hunter to follow the dog from a distance and at night.

Among the early breeders was George Washington, who combined English foxhounds with French hounds. Continued crosses to the slow-trailing but resolute French Grand Bleu de Gascogne produced larger dogs with black ticking and, more importantly, a slower hunting style with better ability to follow old (cold) scent trails.

Much of the breeds development took place in the Louisiana bayous and Tennessee Ozarks. The dogs were initially considered a subtype of English Coonhounds, which were recognized by the UKC in 1905. As the preference for English Coonhounds began to favor faster, hot-nosed dogs, breeders of the blue-ticked ones broke away from them, with UKC granting separate breed status in 1945.

The breed has remained a favorite, with a reputation of staying on the toughest and most confusing trails and for persistence when treeing. Friendly, adventurous, independent, and strong-willed, the Bluetick is a generally laid-back but not overly obedient companion. Notorious counter surfers and escape artists, they like to follow their nose to food or quarryand will pretend to be deaf to pleas to stop.

Their easy going nature makes them a friend to all, enjoying the company of strangers, other dogs, and even other animals (if raised with them). More of an endurance runner than sprinter, the Bluetick needs a long walk or jog daily. Major concerns: none Minor concerns: none Occasionally seen: CHD, ear infections, lysosomal storage disease Suggested tests: (hip) Life span: 11 to 13 years

Note: While the characteristics mentioned here may frequently represent this breed, dogs are individuals whose personalities and appearances will vary.

Bluetick Coonhound

Fast and muscular, the Bluetick Coonhound dog breed stands out for their striking coat. They have a pleasantly pleading expression and a big bawl mouth — meaning they have a long, drawn out bark. Although they’re a hunter first and foremost, the Bluetick can be a fine housedog and loves their people.Even though these are purebred dogs, you may find them in the care of shelters or rescue groups. Remember to adopt! Don’t shop if you want to bring a dog home.Dogs of this breed are highly sensitive and affectionate. With proper socialization training, they’ll even get along with kids in the home. However, with their high energy levels and exercise needs, they don’t make for the best apartment pets. They need to stay active with lots of walks, playtime, and room to roam. Families with large homes would do well to fence in their yards, as these dogs may chase critters who wander by.See below for full list of dog breed traits and facts about Bluetick Coonhounds!

History

The Bluetick Coonhound’s early history is shared with the American English Coonhound. This breed’s forbearers were English hunting hounds that came to America during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Among the early breeders was George Washington, who combined English foxhounds with French hounds. Continued crosses to the slow-trailing but resolute French Grand Bleu de Gascogne produced larger dogs with black ticking and, more importantly, a slower hunting style with better ability to follow old (“cold”) scent trails.Much of the breed’s development took place in the Louisiana bayous and Tennessee Ozarks. The dogs were initially considered a subtype of English Coonhounds, which were recognized by the UKC in 1905. As the preference for English Coonhounds began to favor faster, hot-nosed dogs, breeders of the blue-ticked ones broke away from them, with UKC granting separate breed status in 1945. The Bluetick became a regular member of the AKC Hound Group in 2009. The breed has remained a favorite, with a reputation of staying on the toughest and most confusing trails and for persistence when treeing. When on the trail the Bluetick has a strong bawl.

Temperament

Friendly, adventurous, independent, and strong-willed, the Bluetick is a generally laid-back but not overly obedient companion. Notorious counter surfers and escape artists, they like to follow their nose to food or quarry—and will pretend to be deaf to pleas to stop. Their easy going nature makes them a friend to all, enjoying the company of strangers, other dogs, and even other animals (if raised with them). They enjoy baying—loudly— when excited.

Upkeep

The Bluetick is happiest in the woods following a challenging trail. Even suburban Blueticks should have the chance to follow scent trails and to take in new scents regularly. More of an endurance runner than sprinter, the Bluetick needs a long walk or jog daily. The Bluetick is calm indoors as long as he gets a daily outing. Food must be kept well out of reach. Coat care consists of occasional brushing.

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