Black Snakes in Louisiana?

The black rat snake is very common in many areas. As with many of the Elaphe obsoleta species, the black rat snakes undergo changes in color and pattern. In the case of the black rat snake, they are born a grayish color with dark blotches dorsally. By the time they are around 3 feet long, they are near their adult coloration. Adult coloration ranges from jet black to a deep chestnut brown. One easy distinguishing feature on these snakes is the ivory white chin and throat.

As
with many of the Elaphe obsoleta species, the black rat
snakes undergo changes in color and pattern. In the case of
the black rat snake, they are born a grayish color with dark
blotches dorsally.

What kind of snake is just black?

If you’ve got black snakes around your house, chances are they’re one of two types: North American rat snakes or black racers. Both are nonvenomous, with white or grayish bellies, and eat mostly rodents and other small animals.

Are black snakes usually poisonous?

Black Snake Bites. The black snake is not venomous and most species aren’t known to be aggressive, but if they feel threatened, they will bite. Rat snakes are excellent swimmers, so their first choice is to flee. Usually their size is the most intimidating feature, not their bite, as some can reach 8ft in length.

What should I do if I see a black snake?

What should you do if you see a black snake? The best thing to do is to just let it be. Take a photo, draw a quick sketch, or just sit back and enjoy it from afar. The snake doesn’t want to interact; it just wants to go on its way.

Snakes can be extremely dangerous, so its always a smart idea to learn what varieties you might encounter when you are out walking. Luckily, most snakes are not poisonous, but your life can depend on your ability to determine the ones that are. We are going to list several snakes that you can find in Louisiana to help you understand the wildlife a little better. For each entry, well show you a picture of what it looks like, along with a short description to help you learn a little more about it.

Several species are all easily identifiable by a ring around the body where the neck separates the head from the rest of the snake. The North American Racer is another non-venomous snake that you can find all over the United States, including Louisianna.

Its active during the day and prefers to stay in brush or trash piles near water. Image Credit: Jay Ondreicka, ShutterstockSpecies:Cemophora coccineaLongevity:2030 yearsGood to own as a pet? These snakes are not venomous and are easy to find in Louisianna, but their numbers are declining in other states like New Jersey, where they are becoming quite rare.

These snakes are not captive bred, so any pets will come from the wild, making problems worse. It can release a terrible smelling musk from its cloaca (a snakes butt) if stressed, which will usually send the intruding party on its way. Image Credit: Dylan Wallace, ShutterstockSpecies:Virginia valeriae elegansLongevity:78 yearsGood to own as a pet?

It has smooth skin and doesnt mind when you pick it up, so it makes a fantastic pet. There are several variations of the Garter snake that you can find almost anywhere in the United States, including Louisianna. They usually have yellow stripes on their back that run the length of their body.

Its a smooth snake that almost resembles a worm and has a gray, brown, or reddish-brown color. It prefers sandy soil with plenty of dead leaves and other organic litter to help provide cover. The Redbelly Snake is easy to identify, thanks to its bright orange underside.

The head is usually darker than the rest of the body, and there will be a white dot below each eye. The Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake is the most dangerous snake in Louisiana. Its body is usually brown or tan, with a pattern of dark diamonds along the back.

Image Credit: Paul Staniszewski, ShutterstockSpecies:Crotalus horridusLongevity:15 20 yearsGood to own as a pet? The Timber Rattlesnake is another dangerous animal that you can find all over Louisianna. Colors can vary significantly from one snake to the next, and they will darken over time.

The Eastern Copperhead is easy to identify because of its bright copper color. The Texas Coral Snake is poisonous and can deliver a painful bite. It likes to spend most of its time in underground burrows and only comes out to hunt.

These snakes have one of the most potent bites, but because they spend so much time underground almost, no one gets bit. Wild-caught pets are harder to tame, and it could harm the natural population. We hope you have enjoyed reading over this list and found the answers to your questions.

Ed Malaker is a veteran writer who has contributed to a wide range of blogs that cover tools, pets, guitars, fitness, and computer programming. When hes not writing, Ed is usually performing DIY projects around the house or working in the garden. Hes also a musician and spends a lot of time helping people fix their guitars and composing music for independent films.

Southern Black Racer 5 Coluber constrictor priapus Northern Scarlet Snake 8 Cemophora coccinea copei

Western Earth Snake 9 Virginia valeriae elegans Gulf Coast Ribbon Snake 16 Thamnophis proximus orarius Florida Redbelly Snake 20 Storeria occipitomaculata obscura

Texas Brown Snake 21 Storeria dekayi texana Midland Brown Snake Storeria dekayi wrightorum Marsh Brown Snake 6 Storeria dekayi limnetes

Black Pine Snake 23 Pituophis melanoleucus lodingi Broad-banded Water Snake 6 Nerodia fasciata confluens Blotched Water Snake 31 Nerodia erythrogaster transversa

Eastern Hognose Snake 35 Heterodon platirhinos Western Mud Snake 37 Farancia abacura reinwardtii Western Pygmy Rattlesnake 43 Sistrurus miliarius streckeri

“1) Today Im going to show you the different venomous snakes that live in Louisiana and the non-venomous snakes that look similar to them. I’ll show you foolproof ways to identify venomous snakes so that when you leave here, youll know instantly if a yellow, red and black snake is a coral snake or a non-venomous look alike. Youll also learn how easy it is distinguish a venomous cottonmouth from harmless water snakes. Ill also show you how to identify copperheads, timber rattlesnakes and pygmy rattlesnakes. This is an informal talk so I encourage you to stand up go over to the snake tables over by Joe Incandela at any time. Weve brought lots of museum specimens and some live snakes. You can try your hand at using a snake stick with some harmless species if youd like to.

It wasnt until 2013, around the time that the coral snakes began to make their appearance in Acadia Parish, that I stopped seeing and hearing the copperheads. If its any reassurance, for ten years, those copperheads lived discretely, in an area 30-60 meters from a park where dozens of people came to play sports every day.

“I censored this man to protect his identity although, I doubt be would feel too embarrassed because I literally found these photos on a website called datehookup.com. This is a lot safer than the face dangle but its still dangerous because all coral snakes, babies and adults ARE FULLY CAPABLE of doubling up and reaching the hand if theyre held this way. Unless you were in extremely poor health prior to being bitten, you should not need copperhead anti-venom to save your life but anti-venom aid recovery, provided that it is properly administered and there are no complications.

That and their lack of claws, strong jaws and big teeth make them relatively easy to capture and swallow. Its never just one type or the other that makes up a venom dose, but a complicated mixture of many different toxin molecules from both classes: hemotoxin and neurotoxin. Field collection in remote jungles is emotionally and physically draining work, to say the least and Joe hadnt slept much and he was run down.

In the twilight hour, on the morning of 9/11, in semi-darkness, without looking, he reached his hand into a snake bag that someone told him contained a harmless krait mimic. Being so deep in the jungle, with weather preventing the chopper from reaching them and it being 9/11 and the US embassy was pre-occupied with the disaster that was unfolding simultaneously in the United States.. the odds were stacked against him. Through his investigation of the reality of snakebites, he relaxes a little and becomes more at ease with the fact that snakes exist but he never fully gets over his fear, not even by the end of the book.

Ringneck Snake

The Ring-necked Snake is one of the non-venomous snakes that you can find in Louisiana. Several species are all easily identifiable by a ring around the body where the neck separates the head from the rest of the snake. You can find them all over the United States, and they are quite plentiful in Louisiana.

North American Racer

The North American Racer is another non-venomous snake that you can find all over the United States, including Louisianna. It gets its name from the high speeds it’s able to attain. It’s active during the day and prefers to stay in brush or trash piles near water.

Scarlet Snake

The Scarlet Snake is an attractive species that is easy to confuse with a poisonous Coral Snake. These snakes are not venomous and are easy to find in Louisianna, but their numbers are declining in other states like New Jersey, where they are becoming quite rare. These snakes are not captive bred, so any pets will come from the wild, making problems worse.

Western Worm Snake

The Western Worm Snake is another non-venomous snake that you can find in Louisianna. It can release a terrible smelling musk from its cloaca (a snake’s butt) if stressed, which will usually send the intruding party on its way. It usually has a dark top with a light pink underside.

Earth Snake

There are two varieties of the Earth Snake, the Eastern and the Western. It has a heavy bi=ody and is usually a dark gray. It has smooth skin and doesn’t mind when you pick it up, so it makes a fantastic pet.

Garter Snakes

There are several variations of the Garter snake that you can find almost anywhere in the United States, including Louisianna. They usually have yellow stripes on their back that run the length of their body. It’s a daytime snake that usually hides among dense shrubbery.

Flat Headed Snake

The Flat Headed Snake is one of the smallest snakes in Louisianna, and it typically doesn’t get any larger than about eight inches. It’s a smooth snake that almost resembles a worm and has a gray, brown, or reddish-brown color. The head often looks slightly darker than the rest of the body.

Southeastern Crowned Snake

The Southeastern Crowned Snake is a small and slender snake that you can find in several states, including Louisianna. It prefers sandy soil with plenty of dead leaves and other organic litter to help provide cover. It’s a smooth snake that is generally active during the day.

Redbelly Snake

The Redbelly Snake is easy to identify, thanks to its bright orange underside. The head is usually darker than the rest of the body, and there will be a white dot below each eye. It usually grows to about one foot long and is non-venomous.

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

The Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake is the most dangerous snake in Louisiana. In fact, it’s the most poisonous snake in America. Its body is usually brown or tan, with a pattern of dark diamonds along the back. These snakes get quite large, with some reaching up to seven feet. However, they are currently critically endangered, so they might not be with us much longer.

Timber Rattlesnake

The Timber Rattlesnake is another dangerous animal that you can find all over Louisianna. Colors can vary significantly from one snake to the next, and they will darken over time. You will usually find these snakes in the forest.

Eastern Copperhead

The Eastern Copperhead is easy to identify because of its bright copper color. It’s a little hardier than many other species, and they continue to press into new habitats.

Texas Coral Snake

The Texas Coral Snake is poisonous and can deliver a painful bite. It likes to spend most of its time in underground burrows and only comes out to hunt. These snakes have one of the most potent bites, but because they spend so much time underground almost, no one gets bit.

Cottonmouth

The Cottonmouth is another venomous snake that you can find in Louisianna. It also goes by the name Water Moccasin, and it likes to spend plenty of time in the water. It can deliver a potentially fatal bite but usually coils itself up and shows its’ fangs before it resorts to biting.