Black and White Duck?

A buoyant, large-headed duck that abruptly vanishes and resurfaces as it feeds, the tiny Bufflehead spends winters bobbing in bays, estuaries, reservoirs, and lakes. Males are striking blackand white from a distance. A closer look at the head shows glossy green and purple setting off the striking white patch. Females are a subdued gray-brown with a neat white patch on the cheek. Bufflehead nest in old woodpecker holes, particularly those made by Northern Flickers, in the forests of northern North America. More ID Info

Bufflehead normally live only in North America, but in winter they occasionally show up elsewhere, including Kamchatka, Japan, Greenland, Iceland, the British Isles, Belgium, France, Finland, and Czechoslovakia.

What duck is black and white?

Basic Description. A buoyant, large-headed duck that abruptly vanishes and resurfaces as it feeds, the tiny Bufflehead spends winters bobbing in bays, estuaries, reservoirs, and lakes. Males are striking black-and white from a distance.

What duck has black and white feathers?

Wild Muscovy Ducks are mostly black. Adult males have large white patches on the wings; juveniles show much smaller white wing patches. In good light, the black feathers can show a greenish gloss.

Waterfowl can be fun for beginning birders because they are relatively easy to watch, not flitting through the trees or into the bushes like little dicky birds. They have very distinctive plumages with large patches of color in bold patterns that make identification relatively easy. True, the female dabblers all look pretty much alike, but the males are distinctive. So what do you do when you run up against something you cant identify and cant find in the books? How can you figure out what it is?

This red skin can be quite bumpy, exaggerated, and frankly, gross, with a knob on top of the bill and lumps all over. The wild type plumage of muscovy is all black, glossy greenish on the back, and with large white wing patches.

One popular dark breed is known as the Cayuga Duck, and it may have actually originated in our area (central New York) in the 19th century. This duck is dark all over and rather iridescent, like its shiny speculum feathers got spread over the entire bird. Males will still have the curled tail feathers and the plumage will generally fit in the same basic categories as the other Mallard types.

The recent call duck hanging out at Union Springs, NY is a male (with some problems), and can be recognized by his cute look, curled tail feathers, dusky coloring, and the fact that hes in love with a female Mallard. The best local examples of this phenomenon are the Mandarin Duck pair that was at Myers Point, Lansing, NY briefly in January 2003, and the Red-crested Pochards (and hybrid) that put in an appearance there many years ago. One mark that seems to show up more frequently is pinioning, where the tip of one wing is surgically removed to keep the bird from flying.

This pair of Mandarin Ducks was seen in the marina at Myers Point, Tompkins Co., NY, 16 January 2003. The green on the head, white tail, black rear end, and pale neck ring are good Mallard characters. The gray sides, dark rear end, and intricately patterned chest suggest Gadwall.

The birds look weird and might be mistaken for hybrids, but if you know such things exist you should be less surprised to see such a mix of male and female characters. Domestic ducks arent that exciting to me, and once you realize that most out-of-place waterfowl are escapees and not real vagrants, they lose a little luster too.

If you know ducks well, youll know they come in various breeds, shapes, sizes, and colors. They can have differently shaped bills, unique eye colors, and other characteristics that make them stand out from each other.

Ancona ducks are also great foragers, and they usually supplement any feed you provide with bugs, grass, seeds, weeds, and worms. Wild Muscovy ducks live in Argentina, northern Mexico, and southern Texas in coastal regions and lowland areas.

Muscovy ducks are also widely domesticated throughout North America and can be found on farms and in parks. The black feathers on their backs have green iridescence, their faces have red warts, and they have dark grey bills and feet. They have long necks, white patches in their wings, dark-grey bills, and dark grey feet.

Some of these include seeds, sedges, tubers, grasses, insect larvae, spiders, reptiles, and fish. On average, Muscovy ducks lay 8-15 eggs per nesting with an incubation period of 30-31 days. Pomeranian ducks with black plumage have a green sheen and a white patch around their breast region.

Tufted ducks originated in the Palearctic region, but you can now find them in parts of Africa, Eurasia, and North America. During this period, they spend more time in areas such as Norway, the British Isles, Faroe Islands, and almost all of Europe. The tuft on the back of their head earns them their name, and this is one feature unique to them when compared to other members of the Anatidae family.

Male Tufted ducks have predominantly black plumage, but their underbellies and sides have white patches. Tufted ducks will eat plants such as seeds, grains, nuts, and tubers, and animals such as mollusks, fishes, and insects. They build their nest on the ground in areas close to water with dense sedges and grasses.

Youll find isolated populations of this breed in the western United States, but they are more common in the aspen parklands and boreal forests of Alaska and Canada. Male Buffleheads have black and white feathers on their large heads that are easily noticed from a distance. Bufflehead ducks females have black to dark brown plumage with a white patch on their cheeks.

While flying, both male and female Bufflehead ducks reveal white stripes on their wings. Buffleheads mainly eat aquatic invertebrates such as insect larvae, mollusks, and crustaceans. When fall and winter arrive, Bufflehead ducks incorporate plant matter in their diet.

The most frequently encountered of Washingtons rare waterfowl, Tufted Duck is a Eurasian member of a widely distributed genus of diving ducks that includes Greater and Lesser Scaups and Ring-necked Duck. The male in breeding plumage is told from these similar species by its solid black back and bright white sides with no vermiculation and by a tuft of plumes that hangs down from the rear of the crown (difficult to see when wet and plastered against the head, as it often is when the duck has been diving). The bill has a broad black tip with little or no white behind it. Tufted Duck females, juveniles, and non-breeding-plumaged males are more or less uniformly brown with a much smaller plume or none at all. They are easily confused with scaups and Ring-necked Ducks in similar plumages, and are best separated from them by subtle details of head and bill shape and markings. Hybridsespecially with Greater Scaupfurther complicate field identification.

Most have plump bodies, long necks and short wings. Most feed while on the water, diving or merely tilting their bodies so that their heads and necks are submerged to search for fish, plants and invertebrates.

Washington representatives of the order all belong to one family: Whistling-ducks are also considered a distinct subfamily, and, although they have not been sighted in Washington in many years, Fulvous Whistling-Ducks have been recorded historically in Washington and remain on the official state checklist. All members of the waterfowl family have large clutches of precocial young.

The Tufted Duck breeds at high and middle latitudes from Iceland eastward to Siberia and winters farther south in Europe, Africa, and Asia. Significant numbers reach North America in fall migration and spend the winter, mostly along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. They are usually found as single birds associating with flocks of scaup or Ring-necked Ducks, often in city parks, and sometimes return for successive years.

Washington has had about 50 records since the first one in Seattle (King County) in 1967, and Tufted Duck has been an almost annual visitor to the state since 1979, mostly west of the Cascades. There are now about 10 eastern Washington records, with the first from Wenatchee (Chelan County) in 1986. Oregon has had about 30 records since 1960, and Tufted Duck is annual in British Columbia.

Fulvous Whistling-Duck Dendrocygna bicolor Taiga Bean-Goose Anser fabalis Greater White-fronted Goose Anser albifrons Emperor Goose Chen canagica Snow Goose Chen caerulescens Ross’s Goose Chen rossii Brant Branta bernicla Cackling Goose Branta hutchinsii Canada Goose Branta canadensis Mute Swan Cygnus olor Trumpeter Swan Cygnus buccinator Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus Wood Duck Aix sponsa Gadwall Anas strepera Falcated Duck Anas falcata Eurasian Wigeon Anas penelope American Wigeon Anas americana American Black Duck Anas rubripes Mallard Anas platyrhynchos Blue-winged Teal Anas discors Cinnamon Teal Anas cyanoptera Northern Shoveler Anas clypeata Northern Pintail Anas acuta Garganey Anas querquedula Baikal Teal Anas formosa Green-winged Teal Anas crecca Canvasback Aythya valisineria Redhead Aythya americana Ring-necked Duck Aythya collaris Tufted Duck Aythya fuligula Greater Scaup Aythya marila Lesser Scaup Aythya affinis Steller’s Eider Polysticta stelleri King Eider Somateria spectabilis Common Eider Somateria mollissima Harlequin Duck Histrionicus histrionicus Surf Scoter Melanitta perspicillata White-winged Scoter Melanitta fusca Black Scoter Melanitta nigra Long-tailed Duck Clangula hyemalis Bufflehead Bucephala albeola Common Goldeneye Bucephala clangula Barrow’s Goldeneye Bucephala islandica Smew Mergellus albellus Hooded Merganser Lophodytes cucullatus Common Merganser Mergus merganser Red-breasted Merganser Mergus serrator Ruddy Duck Oxyura jamaicensis

Basic Description

A buoyant, large-headed duck that abruptly vanishes and resurfaces as it feeds, the tiny Bufflehead spends winters bobbing in bays, estuaries, reservoirs, and lakes. Males are striking blackand white from a distance. A closer look at the head shows glossy green and purple setting off the striking white patch. Females are a subdued gray-brown with a neat white patch on the cheek. Bufflehead nest in old woodpecker holes, particularly those made by Northern Flickers, in the forests of northern North America.

Find This Bird

During the winter, look for these tiny, blackandwhite ducks in sheltered coves along the Atlantic or Pacific coast, or on inland ponds in southern North America. While foraging they spend half their time underwater, so scan carefully and patiently. In the summer you can visit their breeding grounds near lakes in the boreal forest and aspen parklands of central Canada.

1. Magpie Duck

Magpies are domesticated lightweight ducks weighing around 4-5 pounds. A large part of their plumage is white, but it is variated with black patches.They also have black feathers on the top of their head, their back, and scattered on their wings. Their bills and feet are yellow or orange, but as they get older, they may become green.While they were prevalent in the United Kingdom in the early 1900s, they didn’t debut in the United States until 1963. In 1977,

2. Ancona Duck

Ancona ducks have plumage with two-toned, black and white feathers.This duck breed is commonly kept for their eggs and meat, and they lay as many as 210-280 white eggs per year. The eggs can also be tan, cream, spotted, or blue.You’ll rarely find Anconas flying. They are active but unlikely to wander far from home. Ancona ducks are also great foragers, and they usually supplement any feed you provide with bugs, grass, seeds, weeds, and worms.

3. Muscovy Duck

Muscovy ducks are also widely domesticated throughout North America and can be found on farms and in parks.The black feathers on their backs have green iridescence, their faces have red warts, and they have dark grey bills and feet.Female Muscovy ducks are large bodied and predominantly black. They have long necks, white patches in their wings, dark-grey bills, and dark grey feet.They feed on plants and animals. Some of these include seeds, sedges, tubers, grasses, insect larvae, spiders, reptiles, and fish.They are typically raised for their meat, but some farmers keep them on hand to drive away snakes and mice.On average,

4. Pomeranian Duck

Pomeranian ducks originated from Pomerania in Germany as a crossbreed. They share an ancestry with some northern European ducks including Shetland ducks and Swedish Blue ducks, and they are considered quite rare.One interesting fact about Pomeranian ducks is that they are known to quack loudly to welcome visitors. This makes them useful as guard animals.

6. Tufted Duck

Tufted ducks originated in the Palearctic region, but you can now find them in parts of Africa, Eurasia, and North America.During this period, they spend more time in areas such as Norway, the British Isles, Faroe Islands, and almost all of Europe.In winter, they move toward northern Africa, southern Europe, Southern Asia, and North America.Male Tufted ducks have predominantly black plumage, but their underbellies and sides have white patches.Female Tufted ducks have black plumage with brown and white patches. Both genders have black bills and black and grey feet.Tufted ducks are monogamous. They build their nests close to water in thick vegetation.

7. Greater Scaup

The females have brown plumage with white patches around the base of their bills.They feed on aquatic plants, seeds, insects, crustaceans, and mollusks. They build their nest on the ground in areas close to water with dense sedges and grasses.

8. Bufflehead Duck

You’ll find isolated populations of this breed in the western United States, but they are more common in the aspen parklands and boreal forests of Alaska and Canada.Male Buffleheads have black and white feathers on their large heads that are easily noticed from a distance. The black feathers around the base of the bill gives off a purple-green iridescence.Bufflehead ducks females have black to dark brown plumage with a white patch on their cheeks.

They fly at lower altitudes when above water then dive for between 12-25 seconds to get their food. They usually swallow their catch while underwater, then return to higher altitudes once out of the water and over land.When fall and winter arrive, Bufflehead ducks incorporate plant matter in their diet. During these seasons, they eat seeds from bulrush and pondweed plants.This breed lays buff or cream-colored eggs. For each nesting, they lay between 4-17 eggs with an incubation period of 28-33 days.

General Description

The most frequently encountered of Washington’s rare waterfowl, Tufted Duck is a Eurasian member of a widely distributed genus of diving ducks that includes Greater and Lesser Scaups and Ring-necked Duck. The male in breeding plumage is told from these similar species by its solid black back and bright white sides with no vermiculation and by a tuft of plumes that hangs down from the rear of the crown (difficult to see when wet and plastered against the head, as it often is when the duck has been diving). The bill has a broad black tip with little or no white behind it. Tufted Duck females, juveniles, and non-breeding-plumaged males are more or less uniformly brown with a much smaller plume or none at all. They are easily confused with scaups and Ring-necked Ducks in similar plumages, and are best separated from them by subtle details of head and bill shape and markings. Hybrids—especially with Greater Scaup—further complicate field identification.