Black American Cocker Spaniel?

The American Cocker Spaniel is a breed of sporting dog. It is a spaniel type dog that is closely related to the English Cocker Spaniel; the two breeds diverged during the 20th century due to differing breed standards in the US and the UK. In the United States, the breed is usually called a Cocker Spaniel, while elsewhere in the world, it is called an American Cocker Spaniel to distinguish it from its older English cousin. The word cocker is commonly held to stem from their use to hunt woodcock in England, while spaniel is thought to be derived from the breed’s origins in Spain.

The American Cocker was the most popular breed in the United States during the 1940s and 1950s and again during the 1980s, reigning for a total of 18 years. In 2013, the cocker spaniel ranked 29th the American Kennel Club registration statistics of historical comparisons and notable trends.

The breed is the smallest of the sporting dogs recognized by the AKC, and its distinctly shaped head makes it immediately recognizable. Members of the breed suffer from a wide variety of health ailments including problems with their hearts, eyes and ears. Obo II, considered to be the foundation sire of the American Cocker Spaniel.The word spanyell is thought to date from the late 12th century when it was used to name a type of dog imported into England from Spain, with the span part of the word referring to the country of origin.

[6][7] The first Cocker Spaniel recorded in America was a liver and white dog named Captain, who was registered with the American Kennel Club in 1878. He differed greatly from the modern breed, being only 10 inches (25 cm) tall and with a long body, but was considered to be an excellent dog of that era and became a popular sire . Towards the end of the 19th century, the breed had become popular in America and Canada due to their dual use as a family pet and a working dog .

The first UK Kennel Club registered American Cocker Spaniel was Aramingo Argonaught, born January 17, 1956 and bred by Herbert L. Steinberg. This included Aramingo Argonaught, who was the first American Cocker Spaniel to be shown at Crufts in 1960 in a class entitled “Any variety not classified at this show”. [18] It is a dog of normal proportions, with medium long silky fur on the body and ears, hanging down on the legs and belly (known as feathering).

The head of an American Cocker Spaniel makes the breed immediately recognizable, with the rounded dome of the skull, well-pronounced stop , and a square shaped lip. [27] IQ tests run on a variety of breeds in the 1950s and 1960s showed that the American Cocker performed the best when tested on its ability to show restraint and delayed response to a trigger, a trait which was put down to the breed’s bred-in ability when hunting to freeze upon finding a bird before flushing it out on command. However, they proved to be the worst breed tested when it came to manipulating objects with their paws, for instance uncovering a dish of food or pulling on a string.

With a good level of socialization at an early age, an American Cocker can get along with people, children, other dogs and other pets. It was bred more and more in conformation with the breed standard , resulting in certain attributes, such as a long coat, which no longer make it an ideal working dog. [30] In a 2004 UK Kennel Club survey, the most common causes of death were cancer (23%), old age (20%), cardiac (8%), and immune-mediated (8%).

[32] In a 2003 USA/Canada Health Survey with a smaller sample size, the leading causes of death were cancer, hepatic disease, and immune-mediated. American Cockers previously high popularity resulted in the breed frequently being bred by backyard breeders or in puppy mills . American Cocker Spaniels are susceptible to a variety of illnesses, particularly infections affecting their ears and, in some cases, their eyes.

Although the number or percent of afflicted dogs is not known, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), glaucoma , and cataracts have been identified in some members of the breed. [34] The American Spaniel Club recommends annual eye exams by a veterinary ophthalmologist for all dogs that are to be used for breeding. The gene which causes this appears in around 10 percent of the population, but DNA testing can prevent two carrier dogs from breeding and thus creating puppies with this condition.

American Cockers are also prone to canine epilepsy and the related condition known as Rage Syndrome . [37] The latter is a form of epilepsy which can cause a normally placid dog to engage in sudden and unprovoked violent attacks.

How much are black cocker spaniels?

The cost of a Cocker Spaniel puppy will range anywhere from $800 to $2000 if you are buying from a breeder. Pedigreed puppies can cost as much as $3000. Adopting a Cocker from a rescue can range from $200 to $350, depending on the age of the dog.

How much do American cocker spaniels cost?

Usually, the average price of an American Cocker Spaniel puppy from a reputable breeder is between $1,000 and $2,000, while a top-quality American Cocker Spaniel puppy can cost as high as $3,500 and upward. Their price depends upon the pup’s age, sex, quality, pedigree, and breeder’s location.

Do American cocker spaniels bark a lot?

Cocker Spaniels can be high strung, vocal dogs, so your Cocker Spaniel is particularly prone to develop a habit of barking at delivery people. The reason this behavior can be difficult to eradicate is that the behavior is self-rewarding.

Are American cocker spaniels aggressive?

Although they are popular family pets, cocker spaniels are consistently ranked among the most aggressive dogs. However, each dog is an individual, and aggression is a highly preventable behavior problem. While it’s easier to prevent aggression than treat it, even the most aggressive dogs can usually learn gentle ways.

The Cocker Spaniel is primarily a beloved companion dog breed, though they remain a capable bird dog at heart. Beautiful to look atand labor-intensive to groomthe Cockers amenable, cheerful disposition also makes them a treat to have in the family.

Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.

Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a toy that’s been stuffed with kibble and treats. These breeds generally aren’t a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Nordic dogs such as Siberian Huskies were bred to range long distances, and given the chance, they’ll take off after anything that catches their interest.

Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they’re more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying.

These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who’s elderly or frail. He is primarily a companion but is easily trained for the conformation show ring, obedience and agility competitions, and field work. However, a number of Spaniel fanciers noticed the different strains of Cocker and sought to preserve separate breeds and discourage the interbreeding of the English and American varieties.

The typical Cocker Spaniel is gentle, a loving and trustworthy family companion who is good with children, other pets, and the elderly. It’s important to remember that seizures can be caused by many other things than idiopathic epilepsy, such as metabolic disorders, infectious diseases that affect the brain, tumors, exposure to poisons, severe head injuries, and more. Like most dogs, the Cocker is better behaved when active than when he’s allowed to get bored, which can lead to such behavior problems as barking, digging, and chewing.

Most owners opt to have a professional groomer bathe, brush, and trim their dogs’ coats every six to eight weeks, and prices are high for this time-intensive breed. Given his sensitive personality, an early introduction is advisable so that he learns to accept the handling, brushing, noise of electric clippers, scissoring, ear cleaning, and all the rest of the tasks involved in keeping him looking good.

“This is my American Cocker Spaniel named Reiley. He is one year old. He is very happy and always in a good mood. One of his little quirks is that he climbs everywhere. Couches, chairs, ledges, and even cars; you name it, he’s climbed it. He loves to play fetch in our backyard. He also likes to hunt with me. He is very intelligent and figures out many ways to entertain himself (good, and bad) and me. One of his bad habits is that he likes to run after rabbits and birds when he’s off-leash. Part of it is the hunting instinct and another part is his mental immaturity. He still has a lot of maturing to do. If you notice, he has a longer nose than the average Cocker Spaniel. He was bred more for field and hunting work rather than being a show-quality dog, but he is still a very handsome dog that has an awesome personality.”

Sable parti merle colored American Cocker Spaniel female Sapphire’s Lovespell MRL AKA Jodie at 1 year old Sable parti merle colored American Cocker Spaniel female Sapphire’s Lovespell MRL AKA Jodie as a 12-week-old puppy

American Cocker Spaniel

TheThe first spaniel in America came across with the Mayflower in 1620, but it was not until 1878 that the first Cocker Spaniel was registered with the American Kennel Club (AKC). A national breed club was set up three years later and the dog considered to be the father of the modern breed, Ch. Obo II, was born around this time. By the 1920s the English and American varieties of Cocker had become noticeably different and in 1946 the AKC recognized the English type as a separate breed. It was not until 1970 that The Kennel Club in the UK recognized the American Cocker Spaniel as being separate from the English type. The American Cocker was the most popular breed in the United States during the 1940s and 1950s and again during the 1980s, reigning for a total of 18 years. They have also won the best in show title at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show on four occasions, the best in show title at Crufts in 2017, and have been linked to the President of the United States on several occasions, with owners including Richard Nixon and Harry S. Truman. In 2013, the cocker spaniel ranked 29th the American Kennel Club registration statistics of historical comparisons and notable trends.The breed is the smallest of the sporting dogs recognized by the AKC, and its distinctly shaped head makes it immediately recognizable. In addition, there are some marked differences between it and its English relative. It is a happy breed with average working intelligence, although by being bred to a show standard it is no longer an ideal working dog. Members of the breed suffer from a wide variety of health ailments including problems with their hearts, eyes and ears.

History[edit]

The wordAccording to historical records, the first spaniel was brought to North America aboard theThe dog considered to be the father of the American Cocker Spaniel was sired by the dog considered to be the father of the English Cocker Spaniel. Ch. Obo was bred to Ch. Chloe II, who was shipped to America while she was pregnant. Once in the United States, she whelped a dog who became Ch. Obo II. He differed greatly from the modern breed, being only 10 inches (25 cm) tall and with a long body, but was considered to be an excellent dog of that era and became a popular sire.Towards the end of the 19th century, the breed had become popular in America and Canada due to their dual use as a family pet and a working dog.

Return to the UK[edit]

Initially in the United Kingdom there were a few American Cockers that had accompanied service personnel to American bases in the 1950s and 1960s. In addition, several came over with embassy staff and business people returning home.The first UK Kennel Club registered American Cocker Spaniel was Aramingo Argonaught, born January 17, 1956 and bred by Herbert L. Steinberg. Two judges confirmed that the dog was an American Cocker and not an English Cocker before the Kennel Club permitted the dog to be shown. In the 1960s they were shown as a rare breed, which meant that they did not have a show class of their own and could only be shown in variety classes. This included Aramingo Argonaught, who was the first American Cocker Spaniel to be shown at Crufts in 1960 in a class entitled “Any variety not classified at this show”.In 1970 the breed was given a separate register in the Kennel Club Breed Supplement, as it was previously included in “Any other variety”. Registration numbers increased to 309 by 1970 following this full recognition.

Notable American Cockers and popularity[edit]

American Cocker Spaniels have won best in show at the Westminster Dog Show on four occasions, with the first win in 1921 by Ch. Midkiff Seductive. Ch. My Own Brucie won the title twice in 1940 and 1941,Brucie’s win in 1940 coincided with the American Cocker Spaniel becoming the most popular breed of dog in the United States, and they would remain the most popular until 1952.American Cocker Spaniels have had several links to the United States Presidency. In 1952, an American Cocker Spaniel became a household name when United States Senator Richard Nixon made his Checkers speech on September 23. A parti-colored American Cocker Spaniel named Dot was one of several dogs owned by Rutherford B. Hayes; and a buff colored dog named Feller caused a scandal for Harry S. Truman when the dog was received as an unwanted gift with the President subsequently giving it away to a White House physician. More recently, a Cocker named Zeke lived with Bill Clinton while he was the governor of Arkansas.

Appearance[edit]

The American Cocker Spaniel is the smallest dog recognized by the American Kennel Club as a sporting dog,The head of an American Cocker Spaniel makes the breed immediately recognizable, with the rounded dome of the skull, well-pronounced stop, and a square shaped lip. The drop ears are long, low set, with long silky fur, and the eyes are dark, large, and rounded. The nose can be black or brown depending on the color of the breed.The coat of the breed come in a variety of shades with the colors being separated into three main groups: black/black and tan, any solid color other than black (ASCOB), and parti-color. The black variety is either all black, or with tan points on the dog’s head, the feet and the tail in a pattern called black and tan. The group known as ASCOB includes all other solid colors from light cream through to dark red, although some lighter coloring is allowed on the feathering according to standards. Parti-colored dogs are white with patches of another color such as black or brown, and includes any roan colored dogs.American Cockers have rounder eyes, a domed skull, shorter muzzle and more clearly pronounced eyebrows than the English Cockers,

Temperament[edit]

Known as the “Merry Cocker“,With a good level of socialization at an early age, an American Cocker can get along with people, children, other dogs and other pets.Members of the breed were originally used as hunting dogs, but increased in popularity as a show dog. It was bred more and more in conformation with the breed standard, resulting in certain attributes, such as a long coat, which no longer make it an ideal working dog.

Health[edit]

American Cocker Spaniels in UK and USA/Canada surveys had a median lifespan of about 10 to 11 years,American Cockers previously high popularity resulted in the breed frequently being bred by backyard breeders or in puppy mills. This indiscriminate breeding has increased the proliferation of breed related health issues in certain bloodlines.American Cocker Spaniels are susceptible to a variety of illnesses, particularly infections affecting their ears and, in some cases, their eyes. Although the number or percent of afflicted dogs is not known, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), glaucoma, and cataracts have been identified in some members of the breed.Heart conditions such as dilated cardiomyopathy, where the heart becomes weakened and enlarged, and sick sinus syndrome, which is a type of abnormal heart beating which causes low blood pressure, have been identified in the breed. Phosphofructokinase deficiency is a condition caused by a recessive gene in the breed which prevents the metabolism of glucose into energy, causing the dog to have extremely low energy and be unable to exercise. The gene which causes this appears in around 10 percent of the population, but DNA testing can prevent two carrier dogs from breeding and thus creating puppies with this condition.American Cockers are also prone to canine epilepsy and the related condition known as Rage Syndrome.

Cocker Spaniel

The Cocker Spaniel is primarily a beloved companion dog breed, though they remain a capable bird dog at heart. Beautiful to look at–and labor-intensive to groom–the Cocker’s amenable, cheerful disposition also makes them a treat to have in the family.Never more pleased than when they’re pleasing you, they’re as happy to snuggle on the couch with their favorite adults as to romp in the yard with the kids. Apartment or large home with a back yard, the Cocker is a highly trainable and adaptable addition to the family. Read on to find out if this is the breed for you!DogTime recommendsSee all dog breed traits and facts about Cocker Spaniels below!