Best Rabbits for Pets?

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There is a huge variety of types of rabbits, each with different looks and personalities, and it can be hard to tell which one is right for you and your family.

This
rabbit has soft, silky fur that is either blue (dark bluish grey) or white. American rabbits do not need any special food or diet, but all rabbits need access to clean water, fresh hay, and nutritious food pellets.

American rabbits need a shelter that is large enough for them to stretch out and get some exercise. They should be brushed every week or two, and given chewing toys, playtime, and attention. The Belgian Hare is a medium to large rabbit breed that weighs 6-9 pounds .

They have a bright rust-colored fur with an orange tint over their whole bodies, with a lighter undercoat visible on their bellies and around their eyes. Belgian Hare rabbits are extremely active and curious, with a tendency to be skittish. They need lots of room for exercise and are intelligent enough to be trained to do some tricks and play games.

The Belgian Hare breed is not prone to any specific diseases or health problems , but rabbits should always be observed for behavioral changes that indicate illness, inspected frequently for any signs of illness, and get an annual checkup with a veterinarian who knows rabbits. Belgian Hares do not need any special food or diet, but all rabbits need access to clean water, fresh hay, and nutritious food pellets. Like any rabbit, the Belgian Hare will enjoy the occasional treat.

Belgian Hares need much more room than other domestic rabbits for activity and exercise. Some people recommend hanging a Belgian Hares water very high, to encourage the rabbit to stretch while drinking. Californian rabbits have a thick coat of dense fur that is coarse to the touch.

They are usually white with Himalayan markings, which are grey or black noses, ears, tails, and paws. Californians
are naturally mild and quiet, but, when well socialized, are an affectionate
pet that loves to play and cuddle. Californian
rabbits do not need any special food or diet, but all rabbits need access to
clean water, fresh hay, and nutritious food pellets.

Californian rabbits have dense fur and a thick undercoat that makes them equally suited to be kept outdoors or indoors. This large breed does need a good amount of space for exercise and thrives with lots of human interaction. Their thick coat needs brushing at least once a week, and more often during shedding season.

The Dutch rabbit is mini to small in size, weighing 4-6 pounds . Dutch rabbits do not need any special food or diet, but all rabbits need access to clean water, fresh hay, and nutritious food pellets. The English Lop is a medium-sized rabbit that typically weighs 9-10 pounds.

The
English Lop has a short, smooth coat and comes in a huge range of colors and
patterns. These rabbits are calm and gentle, but also active, playful, and friendly. They are intelligent and easier to train than some other breeds, and not as prone to chewing.

The English Lop is not prone to any specific diseases, but do need regular care and attention for their ears . Lop breeds are susceptible to wax buildup in their ears, which should be inspected and cleaned regularly. Lop breeds should also have regular nail trimming so that they dont accidentally scratch their ears as they move around.

English Lops do not need any special food or diet, but all rabbits need access to clean water, fresh hay, and nutritious food pellets. The English Lop needs room to play and exercise and welcomes pets and interaction with humans. The English Spot was bred as a show animal, so they are docile and calm, and easy to handle.

The English Spot is not prone to any specific diseases or health problems , but rabbits should always be observed for behavioral changes that indicate illness, inspected frequently for any signs of illness, and get an annual checkup with a veterinarian who knows rabbits. English Spot rabbits do not need any special food or diet, but all rabbits need access to clean water, fresh hay, and nutritious food pellets. Like any rabbit, an English Spot enjoys an occasional treat.

English Spots do need adequate space for exercise and activity for 1-2 hours a day, but they are fairly calm rabbits and do well indoors. Their short coats can be groomed every couple of weeks, and more frequently during the shedding season. They
have short, dense, glossy fur and come in a wide variety of solid colors.

The Flemish Giant is not prone to any specific diseases or health problems , but rabbits should always be observed for behavioral changes that indicate illness, inspected frequently for any signs of illness, and get an annual checkup with a veterinarian who knows rabbits. All rabbits need access to clean water, fresh hay, and nutritious food pellets. Flemish Giants are large enough and intelligent enough to be harness-trained, so they can be taken out on a harness, but that isnt a substitute for free running and jumping exercise.

The French Angora rabbit is a large breed and weighs 7.5 10.5 pounds . The
French Angora has long, thick, soft fur, called wool. They come in a huge
range of colors and patterns. When
given ample exercise and interaction, French Angoras are friendly, sweet,
agreeable pets.

Due to their long, thick fur, French Angoras are particularly susceptible to wool block , and need to be brushed regularly (often every day) to prevent digestive problems from self-grooming. French Angora rabbits do not need any special food or diet, but all rabbits need access to clean water, fresh hay, and nutritious food pellets. Like any rabbit, the French Angora enjoys an occasional treat.

While French Angora rabbits themselves are fairly agreeable and low-maintenance, their coat requires regular care for the health of the animal, even if you dont intend to use their wool. They need regular blow-dryings to keep the fur dry and free of debris (although rabbits should never be bathed). A French Angoras coat can grow as much as six inches every season and needs to be sheared or trimmed 3-4 times a year.

They also need regular exercise and healthy activities like any rabbit. The Harlequin rabbit is medium to large and weighs 6.5 9.5 pounds . Harlequin rabbits do not need any special food or diet, but all rabbits need access to clean water, fresh hay, and nutritious food pellets.

Harlequin rabbits need lots of space for exercise, and they are a more energetic breed that requires more activity than some. Harlequins may be brushed every week or two, and more frequently as needed during the shedding season. The Holland Lop is a dwarf rabbit breed, weighing only 2-4 pounds .

The Holland Lop is not prone to any specific diseases or health problems , but lop rabbits do need special care and attention paid to their ears. While the ears of the Holland Lop are not so low that they typically drag on the ground or risk being stepped on, they should still be regularly inspected and cleaned. Holland Lops do not need any special food or diet, but all rabbits need access to clean water, fresh hay, and nutritious food pellets.

Because they are so small, food portions should be smaller than with larger rabbits. Their hair is medium-length and should be brushed once a week or more often, and the ears should be checked and cleaned regularly. Lionhead rabbits are particularly affectionate and enjoy being picked up, cuddled, and held.

Lionhead rabbits do not need any special food or diet, but all rabbits need access to clean water, fresh hay, and nutritious food pellets. The fine, soft wool of the Lionhead needs daily brushing during the shedding season and may need daily brushing all year long. Netherland
Dwarf rabbits have short, soft hair in a wide range of colors and patterns.

Netherland
Dwarf rabbits are naturally shy and can be skittish, and need a lot of gentle
socialization and interaction to overcome their shyness and bond with humans. The Netherland Dwarf rabbit is prone to a jaw condition known as malocclusion , which makes them unable to wear down their own teeth. Rabbits suffering from malocclusion need trips to the veterinarian to have their teeth filed, and its important to find a veterinarian who is experienced with rabbits because these tiny breeds can be fragile and difficult to handle.

Netherland Dwarves do not need any special food or diet, but all rabbits need access to clean water, fresh hay, and nutritious food pellets. The short hair of a Netherland Dwarf only needs brushing during shedding season, and only as necessary. These tiny rabbits require very little space in order to have enough room for play and exercise and should be kept indoors because they need protection from the weather and from predators.

There are at least 305 recognized breeds of domesticated rabbits around the world , but there are potentially hundreds more that are not widely known outside of their country or community. The largest individual rabbits, however, have been Continental (also known as German) Giants, which can weigh nearly 50 pounds and measure over 4 feet long. The calmest rabbit breeds are the Himalayan, the Flemish Giant, and the English Spot.

They are smart enough to learn simple tricks, and most pet rabbits can also be litterbox trained. With some basic attention to food, housing, and rabbit-proofed safe places, they are fairly low maintenance and extremely enjoyable pets.

What is the best rabbit for a beginner?

Other popular breeds for beginner pet rabbit owners are the Mini Lop, Mini Rex, Dutch and Polish. All four are small breeds that have reputations of being gentle. That being said, all types of domestic rabbits have the potential of being good pets.

What breed of rabbit is the most cuddly?

Lionhead Rabbit..Mini Lop Rabbit..Harlequin Rabbit..Polish Rabbit..Rex Rabbit..English Spot Rabbit..Jersey Wooly Rabbit..Himalayan Rabbit.

Which breed of rabbit is most child friendly?

There are a number of different pet rabbit breeds that get along well with children. Some of the best child-friendly breeds of rabbit for a first time owner include Lionhead Rabbits, Harlequin Rabbits, Dutch Rabbits, Himalayan Rabbits, Chinchilla Rabbits, and Sussex Rabbits.

Whether youre already a satisfied rabbit owner or are looking to add one to your home for the first time, choosing the right breed for your personal situation is essential! Because each breed of rabbit has its own personality quirks, health issues, and logistical considerations, it will do you well to study up on the nearly 50 available breeds before making a choice.

Though originally bred for fur and meat, the attractive blue or white coats on this up to 12-pound breed have led enthusiasts to include it in shows, as well! Coming in at under 4 pounds, American Fuzzy Lops are often friendly and energetic, but require a fair bit of grooming during their shedding season in the summer!

While its never been a widely spread breed, the past 40 years have seen a revival in its popularity due to being mixed with Silver Marten and Rex rabbits. After falling out of favor in 1920s America, a chance coloration of the breed from an Argente Champagne in the early 2000s sparked interest in the rabbit once again. Image Credit: Cassidy Te, ShutterstockWith a slim, fully arched body, the Belgian Hare most resembles wild rabbits seen in American prairie lands.

Being the most popular rabbit breed in America from the early 1900s until the late 1920s, their rich, deeply colored coats and long, thin legs and ears are unmistakable. Image Credit: LightField Studios, ShutterstockNamed for a village in northern France, the Blanc has an unmistakable look: every one of these rabbits is a frosty white coloration, with black circles around the eyes that some say resemble eyeliner. Available in six major colors as well as combination or broken coats, Britannia Petite require minimal space and make lively pets for apartments.

Originating in the famous sparkling wine region of France, the Champagne dArgent has a unique bluish-white coat with black guard hairs that give an almost pewter tone to the fur. Credit: Lukasz Pawel Szczepanski, ShutterstockWith a similarly arched body to the Belgian Hare, the Checkered Giant definitely stands out in a crowd! Image Credit: Shane Fernando, ShutterstockOne of the oldest recognized rabbit breeds, cre ancestry goes back almost 200 years in France.

Image: Xaya from PixabayIf youve ever heard the phrase Dutch markings when describing a rabbit, then youll know the characteristic black mask and white saddle that have made this breeds coat so popular. Image: ahmed abdallah from PixabayThe diminutive relative of the Blanc de Hotot, these black-eyeliner rabbits top the scale-out at around just 3 pounds. With the miniaturized body of the Netherland Dwarf and distinctive eye coloring of the Hotot , these spunky little rabbits make for aesthetically pleasing, space-saving pets.

These gentle giants of the lop family make doting pets, but require special care to prevent them from injuring their enormous ears. Orville Milliken wanted to produce a breed of rabbit that would be small, compact, and good for both meat and laboratory work. While originally developed as a source of fur and meat, show breeders and home enthusiasts alike appreciate the gentle giants even manner and mild temperament.

Image Credit: LNbjors, ShutterstockHaving perhaps the most fascinating coloration patterns of any breed on this list, the Harlequin is named after an Italian clowning persona whose outfit it resembles. Growing to only around 6 pounds, they are on the smaller side of pet rabbits and are a great option for families with limited space for cages. Image Credit: Linn Currie, ShutterstockAs one of the oldest rabbit breeds known, the Himalayan brings with it a decidedly relaxed and easy-going nature.

Combine this with its modest weight (maxing out around 5 pounds) and distinctive coloration, and it makes for an ideal breed to choose as your first rabbit. Image Credit: laurendotcom, ShutterstockThe product of a breeding project involving Angoras, Chinchillas, Netherland Dwarves, and a Silver Marten, this miniaturized rabbit has a friendly disposition and comes in a wide variety of colors. Image Credit: GLady, PixabaySo named for the pinkish hue of its gray coat, the Lilac has been a recognized breed by the ARBA since 1928.

Image: NewWorldPics from PixabayAs you might expect, the diminutive Lionhead is most easily recognized by its crested mane of fur extending from its head and chest. Due to their complex breeding history, the available colors for a Mini Rex continue to multiply, with hues from chocolate to Himalayan to blue-eyed white and everything in-between. Renowned for their incredibly small size (around 2.5 pounds at most) and lovable appearance, the Dwarf comes in a wide variety of solid and broken colors, making it a household favorite.

Image Credit: Irina Kozorog, ShutterstockPerhaps the most popular multipurpose rabbit that America has ever produced, the New Zealand has been used for meat , fur, laboratory, and show purposes since its inception. Image Credit: Sheila Fitzgerald, ShutterstockNamed for its resemblance to the beautiful golden coloring of Palomino horses, this rabbit breed was established in the 1940s in Washington state. Image Credit: Katesalin-Pagkaihang, Shutterstock Satins are the accidental offspring of a Havana breeding program, which happened to produce an amazing shine and texture to the rabbits coats.

Prospective owners should be prepared to potentially spend hours each week grooming, trimming, and collecting the wool from a Satin Angora. Image Credit: Linn Currie, ShutterstockThe Silver Fox is one of the only known rabbit breeds whose fur will stand up rather than fly back when brushed against the grain. Though sometimes unwanted as offspring of Chinchillas, Silver Martens have dense, dark fur with white-tipped guard hairs (giving them their name).

Image credit: Kuttelvaserova Stuchelova, ShutterstockSo-called Full Arch rabbits display the high back and long, slender legs reminiscent of wild hares. With a short, compact body and weight under 6 pounds, they stand out from other similarly sized rabbits due to their vibrant coats. Oliver (Ollie) Jones A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured).

As any rabbit owner will tell you, bunnies are just as cuddly, playful, and smart as your average dog or cat. However, they are more high-maintenance and require consistent, daily care. In addition, different breeds come with different physical characteristics, personality traits, and care needs. For instance, some rabbit breeds love to cuddle, while some tend to hop away when you try to handle them. Potential owners should consider each breed carefully to ensure a good match.

Some breeds, like the Netherland Dwarf, have a high risk of developing malocclusion (the misalignment of the top and bottom rows of teeth when the jaw closes). Other breeds just have the standard rabbit health issues, including overgrown teeth (their teeth never stop growing, so they need to constantly chew things), susceptibility to fly strike (when flies lay eggs in matted/dirty furespecially in unsanitary housing conditions), and ear mites.

As long as you give them proper care and attention, rabbits make great, affectionate pets. Feeding should be monitored closely to prevent overeating and needs exercise. Size: 3.54.5 lbs Appearance: Long, erect ears and short necks.

Short, smooth fur that is extremely dense and can be a variety of colors. Ease of Care: Needs less grooming than most breeds due to their shorter fur. A recessive gene makes the Rex’s hair stick out from their bodies instead of lying flat, and their outer layer of fur is shorter than that of most breeds.

As the name implies, they are fairly small in size (they weigh between 3.5 and 4.5 lbs fully grown) and are incredibly friendly. Size: 24 lbs Appearance: Large, floppy ears with medium-length fur in broken or solid coloring. Personality: Very energetic, active, and friendly but will resist being picked up and held.

Ease of Care: Sheds heavily in the summer months, so needs more brushing during that time. The breed originated in the Netherlands and was officially recognized by the American Rabbit Breeders Association in 1979. Holland Lops are excitable by nature, so they are fun to play with but can also be a little difficult to get in and out of their cages.

While they can get along well with children, they will struggle if they don’t feel like being held, so be sure to supervise any playtime with the rabbit. Size: 45.5 lbs Appearance: Very distinctive black and white coloring. Personality: Calm and gentle but will easily get depressed if left cooped up too long.

Dutch rabbits (a bit of a misnomer, since they were originally bred in England) are well-known for their unique color pattern. They are a bit larger than dwarf breeds, but still on the smaller side overall, averaging 3.5 to 5.5 lbs. Personality: Friendly, and therefore needs frequent human interaction.

Ease of Care: Does fine in smaller cages than most breeds due to their small size. Due to how active they are, they do better with older children who know how to properly handle rabbits and let them down when they need to run. Much like Dutch rabbits, Dwarf Hotots are known mostly for their unique coloring.

They have entirely white coats, except for one small circle of color around their eyes. The larger Blanc de Hotot was bred in the early 1900s to be a black-eyed, white-haired rabbit that could be used for fur and meat. As both rabbit meat and fur went out of style, and more people began keeping these critters as pets, dwarf breeds became increasingly popular, and the Dwarf Hotot breed was created.

They are a great breed for anyone who wants a rabbit that will enjoy cuddles and being pet often, as long as you can wait out the short moody periods. Size: 4.56 lbs Appearance: Very round body with long, thick ears and a large head. Solid or broken patterned fur in a wide variety of colors.

Personality: Greatly enjoy cuddling and human interaction, including being pet and held. Perhaps one of the most popular breeds in the world, Mini Lops are frequently sold or bred as pets and show rabbits. This breed needs intellectual stimulation, so be sure to put plenty of toys in their cage.

Size: 34.5 lbs Appearance: Exceptionally shiny coat in a variety of patterns and colors. Ease of Care: Doesn’t need as much space as most breeds, making it ideal for apartments or small homes. One of the smaller breeds of pet rabbits, Mini Satins also have extremely soft and lustrous fur.

However, they can occasionally be temperamental, so be sure to ask the breeder about your particular rabbit before committing to a Mini Satin if you have a hectic house. Ease of care: Needs open space and regular exercise. They enjoy human interaction but only in an environment where they feel safe and stable.

Extremely small (usually between 1.1 and 2.5 lbs), these rabbits are better suited to a stable and quiet environment better than one with children running around. Despite their small size, these rabbits need a lot of exercise and do better in homes where they’re free to run a good chunk of the day. Size: 2.53.5 lbs Appearance: Short, soft, flyback fur in six distinctive colorings: ruby-eyed white, blue-eyed white, black, blue, chocolate, and broken pattern.

Ease of Care: Is fine with a smaller enclosure due to its small size. However, their small size makes them easy to drop, so exercise caution. They tend to be less active than other breeds, meaning they’re ideal for those who want a rabbit but can’t designate a lot of space for a pen.

They can also be trained to use a litter boxalways a nice trait for an indoor pet rabbit. Size: 2.53.5 lbs Appearance: Distinctive flyaway coat, with particularly long and unruly fur around their head and rear. This breed got its start in Belgium, with breeders mixing a Swiss Fox with a Netherland Dwarf.

A genetic mutation resulted in the Lionhead, a rabbit with longer fur around its head and rear, which later became known as the “mane” gene. Eventually the breed made its way into the United States in the ’90s, and was officially accepted into the American Rabbit Breeders Association in 2014. An energetic and affectionate breed, Lionheads are great pets, especially for families with children.

Health Concerns: Slightly higher-than-normal risk of wool block due to their long, wooly coats. A cross between the French Angora and the Netherland Dwarf resulted in the Jersey Woolya small rabbit with a very wooly coathence the name. First brought to the ARBA in 1984, this breed is now one of the most widely exhibited rabbits at shows in the United States.

Extremely small and loving, they make great pets, even if they do require a little extra grooming. Size: 810.5 lbs Appearance: Muscular body with full shoulders and hindquarters. After several years of breeding and a few different cross-breedings, the Californian rabbit was born.

While these rabbits are primarily used for meat or show, many decide to keep them as pets due to their gentle nature. Size: 6.59.5 lbs Appearance: Mid-sized breed with broad heads and very distinctive coats. Body markings are generally either bands, bars, or a combination of the two, and can encompass a wide variety of colors.

Ease of Care: Needs exercise, space to run, as well as some toys. The breed was renamed during the world wars and are best known for their distinctive coat pattern. They’re a curious and playful breed and make excellent family pets.

Size: 4.56.5 lbs Appearance: Four distinct coat colorings: chocolate, blue, black, and broken. They were named the Havana rabbit because they resembles the chocolate color of Cuban cigars. These rabbits easily bond with humans, making them great pets pretty much anyone.

Size: 57 lbs Appearance: Erect ears and a plump body. Health Concerns: Particularly susceptible to overgrown teeth and ear mites. This breed was developed by crossing wild rabbits with Beverens and Himalayans.

The unique coat color made the breed a hit, especially in the United States. Compatibility With Children: Their patient and gentle nature makes them great rabbits for kids. In addition to friendliness, you want a rabbit that is content with being held, petted, and played with at any time.

Shy or skittish breeds that tend to squirm or bite touched or held should be avoided if you have children in the house. Dutch Harlequin Havana Himalayan Jersey Wooly Lionhead Mini Lop Polish Standard Chinchilla Sussex Still others have strict dietary restrictions, or simply need a lot of human interaction.

Some rabbits do best in outdoor environments and respond better to a home that is similar to their habitat in the wild. This gives them more space, more freedom, and many times, takes the burden off of you to remember to let them out for exercise. American Blue or American White Belgian Hare Beveren Blanc de Hotot Britannia Petite European German Angora Meissner Lop Netherland Dwarf Plush Lop

Question: Which rabbit would be best as a pet, for a 10 and 12 year old that would live outside, playful, cuddles? Answer: I would recommend a Standard Chinchilla or a Blanc de Hotot. While each of these breeds has a specific health issue they can be more susceptible to than other breeds (Standard Chinchillas have a higher risk of overgrown teeth or ear mites, and Hotots have a higher risk of malocclusion), these issues are largely preventable by standard care.

However, be sure they have plenty of water and shade on hot summer days, as well as proper shelter during the cold months. Most outdoor rabbits (see the section of the article subtitled “10 Best Rabbit Breeds for the Outdoors” for my recommendations on these) are less skittish than indoor breeds, and will therefore fare well with dogs as long as the dog isn’t overly aggressive. Male rabbits are more likely to be aggressive towards one another, especially when they hit reproductive age, so if you plan to keep them in the same cage it might be best to look for 2 females.

Question: I’m looking for a calm and social rabbit breed to be good with a cat? Everyone has their own opinion on this one I’m sure, but personally, I’m partial to Holland Lops and find them to be the cutest bunnies around. Question: What are good bunnies for kids but keep outside in 40ft by 40ft pen year-round in southeastern Pennsylvania?

Answer: A combination of research from various animal shelters and rabbitries and my own rabbit-owning experience. Answer: Rabbits use their sharp incisors to cut through the rough, fibrous plants they eat. Male rabbits are more likely to be aggressive towards one another, especially when they hit reproductive age, so if you plan to keep them in the same cage it might be best to look for 2 females.

Question: For a new owner with mild allergies and looking for a cuddly rabbit- between the two would you recommend a min-lop or a mini rex? Answer: Chinchilla, Havana, and Polish are all low-maintenance breeds that are friendly but calm and low-maintenance and enjoy being held/pet. Question: Will I need to make routine vet visits with my rabbit?

Question: What is the best bunny pet that would be kept indoors, low maintenance, friendly for my 11 yr old only child? Answer: Chinchilla, Havana, and Polish are all low-maintenance breeds that are friendly and low-maintenance and enjoy being held/pet. In general, they are good outdoor rabbits but will fare far better if they have a sheltered area available to them.

The heat is generally more of an issue than the cold, so if you live in an area with very hot summers it’s advisable to put ice blocks in their enclosure so they can cool off as needed. Question: Which rabbit breed would be best for an 11 and 13-year old that will not shed in the summer, cuddles, does not need a lot of excises, has a medium size cage, and has no health problems? Answer: Mini Rex, Dutch Lop, Polish and Havana rabbits are cuddly and not overly energetic.

Answer: Mini Rex, Dutch Lop, Polish and Havana rabbits are cuddly and not overly energetic. Answer: I suggest a mini Holland Lop – they’re playful and friendly, and can live inside well. Answer: Lionheads could live outdoors in those conditions, but it is imperative to give them a way to cool down in the heat.

I recommend ice packs or frozen water bottles they can lay next to, and make sure there’s a shaded area for them. Answer: I suggest a mini Holland Lop – they’re playful and friendly, and can live inside well. Or your local humane society or animal shelter may house rabbits for adoption.

Question: What rabbit breeds are good for being an emotional support animal for children? Answer: Chinchilla, Havana, Polish, and Himalayan are all kid-friendly breeds that would work well as emotional support. Do you know of a breed of rabbit that would do well around larger animals, such as dogs, or is that something that we take care of on our own?

Answer: Each individual rabbit does differently with larger animals, but calmer breeds are always better candidates. Answer: Flemish rabbits make great pets, but it is important to keep in mind that, due to their size, they require much more space and exercise than your average rabbit. Most outdoor rabbits (see the section of the article subtitled “10 Best Rabbit Breeds for the Outdoors” for my recommendations on these) are less skittish than indoor breeds, and will therefore fare well with dogs as long as the dog isn’t overly aggressive.

Answer: Mini Lops are exceptionally easy to house train, though I’ve had much luck with many other rabbit breeds – almost all breeds can be house trained without much work. Mini Lops are great indoor rabbits and tend to be very sociable. Question: Do all rabbits need to be let outside every so often, and, if so, how do you make sure they don’t run away or resist being taken inside?

If you do want to let your rabbit out, many pet stores sell movable fence enclosures you can use, or you can also get a leash so you can take it outside for walks with you. He came home with me the next day, after showing his picture to my husband, AND wondering if I was losing my mind a bit. It ended up being a great idea – our little Buster is loving and gentle and inquisitive and playful.

My husband just adores him, and Buster continually licks him to display his reciprocating affection.

One of the joys of owning a pet rabbit is the love and affection that these adorable animals provide. A wide array of breeds are very loving towards their owners, so they quickly become a cherished part of the family.

The only note of caution surrounding Polish rabbits and youngsters is the bunnys small frame. Patient, calm and small enough for anybody to carry, Himalayan rabbits make loving family pets.

Docile and affectionate, the Sussex weighs around seven pounds fully grown and has a life expectancy of six to eight years. The Sussex rabbit is a lovely cream or gold color, with a short, dense coat. Best suited to living indoors, these rabbits also enjoy time exploring the great outdoors.

An excellent pet for families with children, Sussex rabbits are affectionate and love attention. The Havana Rabbit has a sleek, short coat and might be colored blue, black, or chocolate. Havana Rabbits need lots of exercise and stimulation, and are suitable as pets for children.

The Florida White, named for Judge Milikens home state, are small, compact rabbits that, as adults, will weigh between four and six pounds. With a docile and quiet temperament, the Florida White is a good choice of pet for families with children who wish to raise a rabbit indoors. The Lynx Palomino sports a silver or grey surface coat fading to white, beige, or cream.

First bred in 1930s Holland by breeder H. Andreae as a tribute to the Royal House of Orange, the Thrianta Rabbit flirted with extinction when it became a primary food source for soldiers during the Second World War. Thankfully, a few survived, and these were mated with German Rabbits to produce the modern breed of Thrianta. Breeders William Lumb and Benjamin Greaves developed the modern breed of Belgian Hare in 1873.

Belgian Hares prefer outdoor enclosures and are bred primarily as show rabbits. Active and sweet, Belgians are nonetheless a nervous breed and are easily startled, making them a less than ideal pet for children. Its small size and short, thick body type make it a very popular rabbit in Japan, where it fits right into kawaii, or the Japanese culture of cute.

Neither are they suitable for small children, as they have an alert, energetic temperament closely resembling that of the Wild Hare. First noted in England in the 1800s, the Britannia Petite has since been selectively bred to produce a rabbit with a more upright stance and fine bone structure. Active, if a little nervous, Britannias prefer the outdoors and can even be trained to jump obstacles, thanks in part to their arched body type.

A large rabbit, weighing eight to twelve pounds at adulthood, the Beveren has a mandolin, or semi-arch body type, and a life expectancy of between five and ten years. Intelligent, docile, and curious, the Beveren Rabbit prefers the outdoors and loves to explore. The Blanc de Hotot boasts a short coat of soft white fur and dark brown circles around the eyes, known as eyeliner.

Active, friendly, and affectionate, Blanc de Hotot Rabbits make wonderful pets. Friendly and curious, English Spots have a full arched body and an average life expectancy of five to nine years. English Spots have beautiful coats of short, dense fur and come in various colors, including black, blue, turquoise, chocolate, gray, lilac, and gold.

This sweet, affectionate breed makes a great pet but prefers to live outdoors. While normally calm and docile to the point of laziness, American Rabbits are skittish around people, making them less desirable as an indoor or family pet. The base coat is a rich slate gray, while the intermediate color is a rusty brown.

Finally, like the finishing coat on a layered painting, theres the stunning red agouti fur featuring ticking and mackereling of black. All American Fuzzy Lops have distinctive markings on their noses, circles around their eyes, and tinted ears. Known to be active, playful, and curious, the American Fuzzy Lop makes an adorable and affectionate pet.

Bred by Adriann de Cock in the 1950s, the Holland Lop has a lifespan of seven to fourteen years. The Holland Lop Rabbit sports a dense, glossy, smooth coat that may be solid or broken in color. Solid-colored Holland Lops are either chestnut, chocolate, or chinchilla in hue, whereas the broken-colored variety comes in tortoise, seal, or sable mixtures.

Curious and affectionate, the Holland Lop makes an excellent pet for first-time rabbit owners. The German Lop has medium-length, dense fur that is recognized in the following range of different and exciting color varieties: A German Lop with blue, black, chocolate, lilac, or sable fur tipped with either gold or silver is known as ticked .

Docile and affectionate, German Lops make great pets for first time rabbit owners, and for families with children. The Continental Giant is one of the worlds oldest surviving rabbit breeds, having been around since the sixteenth century. Sometimes referred to as Contis by their doting owners, Continentals have dense, thick coats of beautiful glossy fur.

The breed comes in various colors, including white, light gray, steel grey, fawn, sandy, and black. This breed prefers to live indoors but needs plenty of space due to its large size. The Hulstlanders luxuriant coat of dense, soft fur is white, displaying no off-white or yellowing of any kind.

Hustlanders do best with a near-constant companion and dislike long stretches alone, making them wonderful pets for owners with lots of time, love, and attention to give. A medium-sized rabbit with a semi-arched body and distinctive oversized ears, the English Lop should weigh nine or ten pounds fully grown and has a life expectancy of five to seven years. While English Lops are not prone to any particular diseases, this breed can develop health problems if their large ears arent adequately cared for.

A suitable pet for rabbit lovers of all experience levels, New Zealands will live, on average, between five and eight years. Sporting chic coats of short, soft fur, New Zealands come in various colors, five of which have been recognized by ARBA: red, white, black, blue, and broken. Even-tempered, affectionate, and good with children, New Zealands enjoy sitting on their owners lap and being pet.

The breed is prone to infection and colds, though, so be sure not to expose your Brazilian to drafts or sudden temperature variations. Flemish Giants are excellent companion pets if youve got the room to accommodate a large, indoor rabbit. They are affectionate and enjoy lap-sitting, but a word to the wise: Flemish Giants grow nervous quickly if mishandled, so they may not be ideal for small children.

This intelligent, friendly breed will live between seven and ten years and have dense coats of long, glossy hair. A large rabbit with a life expectancy of five to eight years, the Silver Fox will grow to weigh between nine and twelve pounds. The Silver Fox is even-tempered and calm, making it a great choice of pet for families with children who have enough room to accommodate a large rabbit.

Always remember that small children should be supervised, even when handling a rabbit breed known to be suitable for young people.

American Rabbits

First developed in Pasadena, California in the early 1900s, the American was originally named the “German Blue Vienna”; conflict with Germany in World War I prompted its renaming to the breed we know today. Though originally bred for fur and meat, the attractive blue or white coats on this up to 12-pound breed have led enthusiasts to include it in shows, as well!

American Chinchilla Rabbits

One of three “chinchilla” variety rabbit breeds (alongside the Giant and Standard Chinchilla), its fine earthen fur is incredibly similar in color and texture to that of the wild chinchilla. Weighing up to 12 pounds, this breed is considered

American Fuzzy Lop

The adorable descendant of Holland Lop and French Angora parents, American Fuzzy Lops were first bred in the 1980s to provide a compact, wooly rabbit breed with the incredible array of colors found in lops. Coming in at under 4 pounds, American Fuzzy Lops are often friendly and energetic, but require a fair bit of grooming during their shedding season in the summer!

American Sable

Descended from a curiously colored American Chinchilla, the American Sable is colored almost identically to a Siamese cat! While it’s never been a widely spread breed, the past 40 years have seen a revival in its popularity due to being mixed with Silver Marten and Rex rabbits.

Argente Brun

Hailing from the late 1800s France, the Argente Brun is a blast from the past rabbit breed. After falling out of favor in 1920s America, a chance coloration of the breed from an Argente Champagne in the early 2000s sparked interest in the rabbit once again. Weighing up to 10 pounds, their slightly darkened muzzles, ears, and feet complement their chocolate to dark brown coats.

Belgian Hare

With a slim, fully arched body, the Belgian Hare most resembles wild rabbits seen in American prairie lands. Being the most popular rabbit breed in America from the early 1900s until the late 1920s, their rich, deeply colored coats and long, thin legs and ears are unmistakable. They make high-energy, curious pets that love to have room to hop around the home.

Beveren

These black, blue, or white coated beauties come from Belgium, where they are bred to be wonderful outdoor pets. Their coats naturally grow thicker in the wintertime, protecting them from the cold in a way that many other rabbit breeds aren’t so lucky to have. The white-coated Beveren is perhaps the most outstanding of the bunch, with strikingly blue eyes.

Blanc de Hotot

Named for a village in northern France, the Blanc has an unmistakable look: every one of these rabbits is a frosty white coloration, with black circles around the eyes that some say resemble eyeliner. A large and friendly breed, these thick-set rabbits can weigh up to 11 pounds and make excellent companions to households with children.

Britannia Petite

Tied with the Netherland Dwarf for the title of smallest American rabbit breed, these feisty and high-energy rabbits often weigh in under 2.5 pounds! Available in six major colors as well as combination or “broken” coats, Britannia Petite require minimal space and make lively pets for apartments. You may also hear them referred to as a “Polish”, their breed name in England.

Californian

Californians are unmistakable for both their dense, muscular builds as well as black and white color contrast. Attractive and good-natured, they can weigh up to 11 pounds. For show purposes, look for rabbits whose black coloration is confined to the ears, nose, paws, and tail.

Champagne d’Argent

Originating in the famous sparkling wine region of France, the Champagne d’Argent has a unique bluish-white coat with black “guard hairs” that give an almost pewter tone to the fur. With an ideal weight of 10-12 pounds, they are relaxed and friendly rabbits to keep as a pet.

Checkered Giant Rabbits

With a similarly arched body to the Belgian Hare, the Checkered Giant definitely stands out in a crowd! With their 11 to 16-pound top weight, these handsome rabbits are high energy and distinctly black and white-colored. They make excellent companions for anyone who can give them a large cage and plenty of room to run around.

Cinnamon

This uncommonly friendly mid-size rabbit is the product of a complex family tree including New Zealand, Chinchilla, Checkered Giant, and Californian rabbits. The end result is an unmistakably colored, gentle tempered pet with a beautiful sheen to its luxurious coat.

Crème d’Argent

One of the oldest recognized rabbit breeds, cre ancestry goes back almost 200 years in France. They are most well-known for their stunning coat coloration: golden white, with a nearly orange undercoat except on its pure white belly. Though never particularly popular in America, this rabbit breed loves having its silky coat pampered and petted.

Dutch

If you’ve ever heard the phrase “Dutch markings” when describing a rabbit, then you’ll know the characteristic black “mask” and white “saddle” that have made this breed’s coat so popular.Coming to the U.S. by way of London and Belgium, these compact (only around 5-pound) rabbits are hardy, adaptable, and caring. In fact, female Dutch rabbits are often used as foster mothers because of their agreeable temperament!

Dwarf Hotot

The diminutive relative of the Blanc de Hotot, these black-eyeliner rabbits top the scale-out at around just 3 pounds. With the miniaturized body of the Netherland Dwarf and distinctive eye coloring of the Hotot, these spunky little rabbits make for aesthetically pleasing, space-saving pets.

English Angora Rabbits

“Where did his face go?!?”, you may ask of this exceptionally long-haired breed! Often looking like a furball with ears, the English is the smallest of four Angora breeds. It comes in a shocking variety of colors, all complete with characteristically fluffy coats.If you’re considering keeping an Angora as a pet, just know that you’ll need to spend

English Lop

While all lop breeds have long, droopy ears that hang below their chin, the English lop takes this to an extreme: Their ears may stretch almost

English Spot

Another of the mid-sized English rabbit breeds, the Spot was selectively bred from wild English rabbits sometime in the late 19

Flemish Giant

Weighing up to 20 pounds, these Belgian-born beauties are true to their giant name! Gentle and loving, they have a unique semi-arched body and come in seven colors: Black, blue, fawn, light gray, sandy, steel gray, and white. Imported to the United States since the 1890s, they have been equally prized as pets, show rabbits, or sources of meat and pelts.

Florida White

Lustrous and white with pink eyes, the Florida White is the breeding project of a rabbit show judge (from Florida, as you might expect). Orville Milliken wanted to produce a breed of rabbit that would be small, compact, and good for both meat and laboratory work. While this rabbit never caught on for its intended purposes, it has become a popular option as a show rabbit due to its calm temperament.

French Angora

If you would prefer your ball of fur with a visible face, look no further than the French Angora! While their coats are just as long as their English brethren, these larger rabbits (up to 11 pounds) have much more cleanly trimmed faces. As with all Angora breeds, you must be committed to consistent grooming to keep them healthy as pets.

French Lop

Another of the especially popular lop family, the French Lop most closely resembles an English Lop – but without the oversized ears. They’re on the heavier side of lop breeds, often weighing close to 12 pounds. They make excellent, docile house pets and come in an exceptionally wide variety of colors.

Giant Angora

Developed as a breed only as recently as the 1980s, the Giant Angora is impossible to mistake for any other breed. Seen only in white and weighing nearly 10 pounds or more, they still possess the distinctive long coat of other Angora breeds. As a pet, they are slow-moving and gentle, and require much grooming and special care to keep their coats in good condition.

Giant Chinchilla

At a maximum of nearly 16 pounds, these are the largest of the three Chinchilla breeds in North America. While originally developed as a source of fur and meat, show breeders and home enthusiasts alike appreciate the gentle giant’s even manner and mild temperament.

Harlequin

Having perhaps the most fascinating coloration patterns of any breed on this list, the Harlequin is named after an Italian clowning persona whose outfit it resembles. Sporting alternating bands of color across its body as well as an evenly divided two-tone face, the Harlequin was initially known as the Japanese Rabbit (before World War II soured U.S. and Japanese relations).Of medium size and coming in a variety of colors, they make a truly unique and easygoing house pet.

Havana

While its name might suggest an island birthplace, the Havana’s ancestry is Dutch in origin. Because the first rabbits of this breed were a rich black, they received the name “Havana” in reference to the rich, dark brown hues of tropical cigar tobacco. Growing to only around 6 pounds, they are on the smaller side of pet rabbits and are a great option for families with limited space for cages.

Himalayan

As one of the oldest rabbit breeds known, the Himalayan brings with it a decidedly relaxed and easy-going nature. Combine this with its modest weight (maxing out around 5 pounds) and distinctive coloration, and it makes for an ideal breed to choose as your first rabbit. There’s good reason it’s one of the most widespread rabbit breeds on the planet today!

Holland Lop

The most Bulldog-like in appearance among the lop family and the smallest (weighing only 4 pounds at maximum), the Holland Lop has become one of the more popular rabbit breeds of the last 50 years.Combining the dashing good looks of French Lops with the ease of ownership of miniature rabbit breeds, Holland Lops are also available in a huge variety of colors. They make an ideal starter pet in almost any home.

Jersey Wooly

Another of the adorably fluffy rabbit breeds, the Jersey Wooly is the invention of a New Jersey breeder who wanted a pint-sized, wool coat breed that was easier to maintain than an Angora.The product of a breeding project involving Angoras, Chinchillas, Netherland Dwarves, and a Silver Marten, this miniaturized rabbit has a friendly disposition and comes in a wide variety of colors. They are ideal for anyone who loves the look of Angoras but is afraid of the grooming requirements.

Lilac

So named for the pinkish hue of its gray coat, the Lilac has been a recognized breed by the ARBA since 1928. Initially developed for meat and fur, their beautiful coats led them to being kept as show and pet animals as well. Capping out at 8 pounds, they make excellent pets for people who prize a shiny coat.

Lionhead

As you might expect, the diminutive Lionhead is most easily recognized by its crested mane of fur extending from its head and chest. A popular small breed (rarely exceeding 4 pounds), it is available in ruby-eyed white or tortoiseshell coat colorations. Though not nearly as grooming intensive as the Angora, prospective owners should be prepared to do light trimming around their manes.

Mini Lop

While certainly not a large rabbit, the Mini Lop may be better recognized as an average-sized breed – especially in comparison to the tiny Holland Lop. Their added weight (approximately 2 pounds heavier than Holland Lops) may contribute to their overall calmer and more sedentary demeanor. Like all other lops, they are available in a wide palette of color choices.

Mini Rex

All hail the king! This 5-pound rabbit is equipped with rich, velvety fur and a friendly disposition. Due to their complex breeding history, the available colors for a Mini Rex continue to multiply, with hues from chocolate to Himalayan to blue-eyed white and everything in-between.

Mini Satin

One of the more recently developed “mini” breeds, the Mini Satin is known for its brilliantly lustrous and shiny coat. Weighing in under 5 pounds, these rabbits have only been around since the 1970s and possess a wide range of temperaments; it’s recommended to meet each rabbit individually to determine compatibility.

Netherland Dwarf

As the parent stock of many “mini” breeds, the Netherland Dwarf holds a special place in the rabbit breeding world. Indeed, because of their characteristically aggressive attitude, many mini breeds display their same zest for life and high energy! Renowned for their incredibly small size (around 2.5 pounds at most) and lovable appearance, the Dwarf comes in a wide variety of solid and broken colors, making it a household favorite.

New Zealand

Perhaps the most popular multipurpose rabbit that America has ever produced, the New Zealand has been used for meat, fur, laboratory, and show purposes since its inception. In fact, most commercial rabbit meat production today comes from the New Zealand breed. Quite easy-going, they also make fantastic house pets.

Palomino

Named for its resemblance to the beautiful golden coloring of Palomino horses, this rabbit breed was established in the 1940s in Washington state. Averaging around 11 pounds, they are said to have a pleasant disposition and be readily trainable.

Polish

Contending with the Netherland Dwarf for “cutest tiny rabbit breed”, the Polish rabbit often weighs no more than 3.5 pounds. They are available in black, blue, chocolate, blue-eyed white, ruby-eyed white, or a broken white dappled with any of the previous colors. Unlike the Netherland Dwarf, they do not have a reputation for being quite so feisty!

Rex

The original “king” of rabbits, the nearly 11-pound Rex was originally bred for meat and fur in France. Once they were introduced to the U.S. show circuit in the 1920s, though, the Rex took on new fame as a show and household pet worthy choice of rabbit.

Rhinelander

This German-born breed is most well known for its very specific color pattern: A white body is home to two-color markings along the sides, a streak of color down its spine, dark eye bands, and a dark snout. A medium-sized rabbit, it is an uncommon breed in the United States.

Satin

Satins are the accidental offspring of a Havana breeding program, which happened to produce an amazing shine and texture to the rabbits’ coats. Most Satins will weigh in under 11 pounds and are often used to “satinize” other breeds of rabbit, making their fur glossier and more richly textured.

Satin Angora

Owing to its Satin and French Angora heritage, the Satin Angora may have the most plush and luxurious coat of any rabbit breed today. Of medium size, they are prized for their wool production. Prospective owners should be prepared to potentially spend hours each week grooming, trimming, and collecting the wool from a Satin Angora.

Silver

On the smaller side of medium, most Silvers weigh only around 6 pounds. While it is one of the oldest known rabbit breeds, it is also one of the rarest to find in North America today. Their silver guard hairs distinguish their otherwise plain black, brown, or fawn-colored coats, making them instantly recognizable.

Silver Fox

The Silver Fox is one of the only known rabbit breeds whose fur will stand up rather than fly back when brushed against the grain. Large (up to 12 pounds) and gentle in nature, they were originally known as the “American Heavyweight Silver” before a name change in 1929.

Silver Marten

Though sometimes unwanted as offspring of Chinchillas, Silver Martens have dense, dark fur with white-tipped guard hairs (giving them their name). Firmly medium-sized, their distinctive coloration around the eyes, nose, and chin have given many owners reason to love them.

Standard Chinchilla

Third in the Chinchilla group and most popular as show animals or pets, the Standard Chinchilla’s coat has a rich blend of earthy colors. Weighing around a maximum of 7.5 pounds, they are a hardy and adaptable breed to keep as pets.

Tan

So-called “Full Arch” rabbits display the high back and long, slender legs reminiscent of wild hares. The Tan’s impressive coloration includes a tan collar on short, highly lustrous fur. Their eye-catching two-tone coats and moderate weight (around 6 pounds at most) have made them a popular option as a show rabbit or pet.

Thrianta

Bred from Tans, English Spots, and Havanas, the Thrianta is distinctly pumpkin-colored – an absolute rarity among rabbits. With a short, compact body and weight under 6 pounds, they stand out from other similarly sized rabbits due to their vibrant coats.

Columbia Basin Pygmy Rabbit

Our first choice is the Columbia Basin Pygmy. This is not only the smallest rabbit in the world but also the rarest. They nearly became extinct in the 1990s, but have managed to make a comeback. They are tiny, soft, with long ears, and a tiny nose.

Dwarf Lop

Speaking of dwarf rabbits, it would not be a “cute list” if we did not mention the dwarf lop. Last, but most certainly not least, this tiny treasure has soft fur and floppy ears. Their coat comes in many different colors and patterns, plus as mentioned, they are one of the most popular rabbit breeds for pets, as mentioned to us by the team at Rabbit Spot.

Do Rabbits Make Good House Pets?

As any rabbit owner will tell you, bunnies are just as cuddly, playful, and smart as your average dog or cat. However, they are more high-maintenance and require consistent, daily care. In addition, different breeds come with different physical characteristics, personality traits, and care needs. For instance, some rabbit breeds love to cuddle, while some tend to hop away when you try to handle them. Potential owners should consider each breed carefully to ensure a good match.Owners should also consider each breed’s susceptibility to health problems. Some breeds, like the Netherland Dwarf, have a high risk of developing malocclusion (the misalignment of the top and bottom rows of teeth when the jaw closes). Other breeds just have the standard rabbit health issues, including overgrown teeth (their teeth never stop growing, so they need to constantly chew things), susceptibility to fly strike (when flies lay eggs in matted/dirty fur—especially in unsanitary housing conditions), and ear mites. As long as you give them proper care and attention, rabbits make great, affectionate pets.

Holland Lop

Mini Rexes originated in France in the late 1800s. A recessive gene makes the Rex’s hair stick out from their bodies instead of lying flat, and their outer layer of fur is shorter than that of most breeds. This means that you can feel their exceptionally soft, velvety undercoat.As the name implies, they are fairly small in size (they weigh between 3.5 and 4.5 lbs fully grown) and are incredibly friendly. There is little reason to question why they are one of the most popular rabbit breeds in America.

Dwarf Hotot

Dutch rabbits (a bit of a misnomer, since they were originally bred in England) are well-known for their unique color pattern. They are a bit larger than dwarf breeds, but still on the smaller side overall, averaging 3.5 to 5.5 lbs. They are a calm and easygoing breed, making them exceptional pets—especially for those with children. They can put up with the chaos of being frequently pet and held.

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Hotots have upright ears and tend to be under 3 lbs in weight. They tend to be outgoing, though can occasionally be moody. They are a great breed for anyone who wants a rabbit that will enjoy cuddles and being pet often, as long as you can wait out the short moody periods.

Mini Satin

Perhaps one of the most popular breeds in the world, Mini Lops are frequently sold or bred as pets and show rabbits. Similar to Holland Lops, they are small with floppy ears. They are extremely cheerful and playful, and are easily trained. Mini Lops are great for anyone looking to have a litter-trained bunny. They are very sociable with other rabbits and animals, but they do prefer calm children. This breed needs intellectual stimulation, so be sure to put plenty of toys in their cage.

Polish

Unlike many of the breeds on this list, Netherland Dwarf rabbits are not the best pet breed homes with children. They are, however, great pets for adults and make good companions for adults with disabilities.They enjoy human interaction but only in an environment where they feel safe and stable. Extremely small (usually between 1.1 and 2.5 lbs), these rabbits are better suited to a stable and quiet environment better than one with children running around. Despite their small size, these rabbits need a lot of exercise and do better in homes where they’re free to run a good chunk of the day. They are skittish and aloof, which, again, is why they are not well-suited as children’s pets.

Jersey Wooly

This breed got its start in Belgium, with breeders mixing a Swiss Fox with a Netherland Dwarf. A genetic mutation resulted in the Lionhead, a rabbit with longer fur around its head and rear, which later became known as the “mane” gene. Eventually the breed made its way into the United States in the ’90s, and was officially accepted into the American Rabbit Breeders Association in 2014. An energetic and affectionate breed, Lionheads are great pets, especially for families with children. However, they do need more grooming and care than some other breeds.

Harlequin

When George West set out to breed the Californian rabbit, his goal was to create a rabbit with the “perfect” meat as well as a dense, desirable coat. After several years of breeding and a few different cross-breedings, the Californian rabbit was born. While these rabbits are primarily used for meat or show, many decide to keep them as pets due to their gentle nature.

Standard Chinchilla

Oddly enough, Havanas got their start in Holland. They were named the “Havana” rabbit because they resembles the chocolate color of Cuban cigars. These rabbits easily bond with humans, making them great pets pretty much anyone.

Low-Maintenance Rabbit Breeds

The Himalayan rabbit is one of the oldest rabbit breeds in existence—to the point that much of its origins are unknown. What is known is that Himalayan rabbits made their first appearance in America around the early 1900s. Very patient and calm, they instantly became a popular pet breed.

Best Rabbit Breeds for the Outdoors

If you live in an apartment, a small home, or you don’t have access to a yard, consider these breeds that are perfectly happy living in cages and occasionally being let out to run around. Rabbit breeds perfect for the indoors are generally the smaller varieties either because they’re hard to contain outdoors or because they’re particularly vulnerable in outdoor environments.

Questions & Answers

1. American Blue or American White2. Belgian Hare3. Beveren4. Blanc de Hotot5. Britannia Petite6. European7. German Angora8. Meissner Lop9. Netherland Dwarf10. Plush LopAmerican Blue or American WhiteBelgian HareBeverenBlanc de HototBritannia PetiteEuropeanGerman AngoraMeissner LopNetherland DwarfPlush LopOr your local humane society or animal shelter may house rabbits for adoption.

Do Rabbits Make Good Companion Pets?

Bringing a rabbit into your home is a huge responsibility. Rabbits aren’t low-maintenance starter pets. They require lots of attention. If you meet their day-to-day needs, you’ll have a new best friend.The

Harlequin Rabbits as Pets

All rabbits are friendly and affectionate. Bunnies are social animals, and loathe being alone for long periods of time. This means that any rabbit will enjoy spending time with humans.What interaction they enjoy differs between breeds. Rabbits are often skittish due to their status asA house rabbit should beLet’s take a more detailed look at each of these bunnies. With more information, you can build the ideal environment for your pet.

Rex Rabbits as Pets

There are many different sub-breeds of theRex rabbits are maternal and protective. This makes them great companions for seniors or single people. They’ll always be keen to keep you company, day and night.Rex rabbits areRex rabbits prefer being petted and scratched to being held. This is especially prevalent in the mini Rex breed. They will squirm if they’re held too tightly. Avoid distressing a Rex by insisting on cuddles.

Jersey Wooly Rabbits as Pets

TheThis breed is also famed for its docility. The Jersey Wooly is often informally called the ‘no-kick bunny.’ This makes themAs this breed is so small, they can also dwell in a more compact enclosure. This makes them ideal for small houses or apartments. Just let them out, and enjoy the attention they provide.The only note of caution for the Jersey Wooly is their

Dutch Rabbits as Pets

The name of these rabbits is misleading, as they hail from England. That’s the only complexity that surrounds these bunnies. They are loving and easy pets to maintain.One of the best things about Dutch rabbits is their calm demeanor. These rabbits are easygoing and affectionate. A Dutch rabbit will be nonplussed by children, no matter how chaotic. They actively enjoy being held and go with the flow.Dutch rabbits are small – only just

Mini Lop Rabbits as Pets

Arguably more than any other breed, the Mini Lop was born to be a pet. They look like teddy bears and love to be showered with affection. They return this adoration without question.Mini Lop rabbits are also intelligent. This works in your favor, as it means they can be litter trained. They require constant entertainment, though. Fill their hutch with toys, and arrangeMini Lops and children can be a great match. This breed is loving, and will enjoy being petted, held and cuddled. They’re also energetic, so bunny and child will tire each other out.The only note of caution with Mini Lops is that they can become overstimulated. Over-excitement brings out the worst in a Mini Lop, and they may bite in their exhilaration. It’s safer to pair this breed with older, calmer children.

Chinchilla Rabbits as Pets

The Chinchilla rabbit is a comparatively young breed. Don’t be fooled by the moniker; they’re not related to chinchillas. The name comes from this breed’s distinctive gray coat.Chinchilla rabbits are easy-going and enjoy human company. Due to their larger size, they should be released from their hutch often. This doesn’t mean they need to run free, though.Chinchilla rabbits are not particularly energetic, and will often be found relaxing on the floor or sofa. This makes them loving pets for anybody looking for a lower-maintenance rabbit.It’s best to introduce children to a chinchilla rabbit while the bunny is young. If you do so, the rabbit will welcome their presence. They enjoy petting, and will happily tolerate handling.

Polish Rabbits as Pets

Few bunnies are more suited to life as an indoor pet than the Polish rabbit. This dwarf-sized breed is tiny and can contentedly live in a smaller hutch.As the Polish rabbit is quite lazy, they also require limited exercise. Instead of running around, a Polish rabbit is likelier to seek cuddles. A bonded Polish rabbit is among the most affectionate of all bunny breeds.Polish rabbits will fascinate children as this is the breed that magicians pull from hats. The bunny will be equally enamored with a child that wants to pet and cuddle them.The only note of caution surrounding Polish rabbits and youngsters is the bunny’s small frame. They are so small that they can easily be dropped.

Lionhead Rabbits as Pets

TheLionhead rabbits are also more playful than many rabbit breeds. They enjoy entertaining humans and find children delightful. If a Lionhead rabbit is being showered with attention, it’ll be perfectly happy.All of this sounds like a Lionhead rabbit is a perfect first rabbit for youngsters. Unfortunately, Lionheads also need a great deal of care.This breed is initially timid, and will bite and nip when afraid. The trust of a Lionhead rabbit must be built slowly, steadily and calmly.Also, Lionhead rabbits require near-constant grooming. Their name arises from a genetic mutation, which produces a mane of hair around the neck. Some children will lack the patience needed to manage this.Lionheads make affectionate bunnies for committed owners. If you demonstrate the patience they require, this breed is the ideal companion.

Californian Rabbits as Pets

Californian rabbits are affectionate and love to cuddle. There is one caveat, though. This breed is initially shy. You need to earn the love of a Californian rabbit.This means that Californian rabbits are not ideal for children. They won’t bite, as they’re a docile breed. They will be afraid and anxious which can lead to health concerns.Once you have bonded with a Californian rabbit, let it call the shots. If you wait for your bunny to approach you, you’ll reap the rewards. You’ll find that your bunny rarely leaves your side.Californian rabbits will hop into your lap and ask for petting once you’ve gained their trust. Let your bunny roam around the house and it’ll soon come to find you.

Himalayan Rabbits as Pets

This is the oldest known rabbit breed in the world. As a result, they’ve had plenty of time to adjust to domesticity.Himalayan rabbits are very loving and docile, and they’ll welcome the human company. They need time outside their hutch. This doesn’t necessarily mean exercise, though.Himalayan rabbits need to run a little, but what they love most is sunshine. If you have a back yard, allow your Himalayan to relax with you outdoors. They enjoy cuddling up with their owners and soaking in the sun’s rays.Patient, calm and small enough for anybody to carry, Himalayan rabbits make loving family pets. Just make sure they get sufficient sunlight.

Sussex Rabbits as Pets

Bred in the 1980s by crossing Lilac rabbits and Californians, the Sussex is a beautiful, medium-sized rabbit with a compact body. Docile and affectionate, the Sussex weighs around seven pounds fully grown and has a life expectancy of six to eight years.The Sussex rabbit is a lovely cream or gold color, with a short, dense coat. Best suited to living indoors, these rabbits also enjoy time exploring the great outdoors.An excellent pet for families with children, Sussex rabbits are affectionate and love attention. This breed can be a bit naughty, though, so be sure to keep an eye on them when they’re out of their enclosures, and especially outside!While Sussex rabbits have no particular health issues, they tend to overeat, leading to obesity and further health problems. Be careful not to overfeed your cute little friend, as they may not know when to say when.

Havana Rabbits as Pets

Sometimes described as “mink-like,” Havana Rabbits are a medium-sized breed with rounded, compact bodies. Bred in Ingen, Holland in 1989, Havanas earned the nickname “The Fireye From Ingen,” as their eyes appear to glow red from certain angles.The Havana Rabbit has a sleek, short coat and might be colored blue, black, or chocolate. The breed gets its name because the chocolate-hued variety resembles the color of a Havana cigar.A gentle, calm, and sometimes playful rabbit, the Havana is a great choice for a pet. They’re sociable with people and also with other rabbits. Havana Rabbits need lots of exercise and stimulation, and are suitable as pets for children.

Florida White Rabbits as Pets

In the 1960s, Judge Orville Miliken bred the first Florida White Rabbits by crossing Albino Dutch Rabbits, New Zealands, and Red-Eyed White Polish Rabbits. The Florida White, named for Judge Miliken’s home state, are small, compact rabbits that, as adults, will weigh between four and six pounds.The Florida White Rabbit has a short, soft, exclusively white coat and red-hued eyes. The breed has a lifespan of five to eight years and isn’t prone to any particular health problems.With a docile and quiet temperament, the Florida White is a good choice of pet for families with children who wish to raise a rabbit indoors. Florida Whites can live outside but are better socialized when kept indoors.

Palomino Rabbits as Pets

First bred in the 1950s and originally called the Washingtonian Rabbit, the Palomino is a medium-sized rabbit that will grow to between eight and ten pounds. Docile and sweet, Palominos should live between five and eight years.The Palomino comes in two color varieties, the Golden and the Lynx. The Golden has a cream or beige surface coat with a white undercoat. The Lynx Palomino sports a silver or grey surface coat fading to white, beige, or cream. Both types have coats of coarse, short to medium fur.Friendly, low-maintenance rabbits, Palominos make excellent first-time pets for rabbit lovers of all ages.

Thrianta Rabbits as Pets

The story of the Thrianta Rabbit is the story of a breed that very nearly didn’t survive. First bred in 1930s Holland by breeder H. Andreae as a tribute to the Royal House of Orange, the Thrianta Rabbit flirted with extinction when it became a primary food source for soldiers during the Second World War.Thankfully, a few survived, and these were mated with German Rabbits to produce the modern breed of Thrianta. A medium-sized rabbit with a compact body, the Thrianta will weigh from four to six pounds at maturity. The lifespan of the Thrianta Rabbit is between seven and ten years.The Thiantra’s short, thick coat is an unmarked, beautiful fire-red. Docile and gentle, this breed is child and first-time-owner safe and has no particular health concerns.

Best Outdoor Rabbit Breeds

Before adopting a bunny as a child’s pet, there are several things to consider. These include:It’s hard to look past the Harlequin rabbit. These bunnies love people, grow to a child-friendly size and weight, and can be taught tricks.If a Harlequin rabbit is not an option, consider a Dutch rabbit instead. These bunnies love to exercise, and are very tolerant of handling. This means that they’ll contentedly play with a child for hours.The ever-popular Mini Lop is always an option. These bunnies are adorable, and will become a constant companion for your child. Just supervise playtimes and don’t allow a Mini Lop to get too agitated.Few things are as rewarding as the mutual adoration of a pet rabbit and its owner. But, before you introduce a bunny to your family, find out the

Belgian Hare Rabbits as Pets

Closely resembling the Wild Hare, the Belgian Hare is a large rabbit, weighing six to nine pounds at maturity. First noted in eighteenth-century Belgium, the breed was imported to England in 1856. Breeders William Lumb and Benjamin Greaves developed the modern breed of Belgian Hare in 1873.The Belgian Hare has a coat of short, glossy, rust-colored fur in a radiant reddish-orange tint.Belgian Hares prefer outdoor enclosures and are bred primarily as show rabbits. Active and sweet, Belgians are nonetheless a nervous breed and are easily startled, making them a less than ideal pet for children.

Netherland Dwarf Rabbits as Pets

Described as having “babyish” features and weighing only two pounds at full size, the Netherland Dwarf is the smallest domesticated rabbit breed. Its small size and short, thick body type make it a very popular rabbit in Japan, where it fits right into “kawaii,” or the Japanese “culture of cute.”The Netherland Dwarf Rabbit was bred in the early 1900s by Jan Meyering. The breed comes in many colors, including black, turquoise, and opal.While the Netherland Dwarf is undoubtedly adorable, it is, unfortunately, not a lap-pet. Neither are they suitable for small children, as they have an alert, energetic temperament closely resembling that of the Wild Hare.

Britannia Petite Rabbits as Pets

The Britannia Petite Rabbit evolved naturally from the Polish Rabbit. First noted in England in the 1800s, the Britannia Petite has since been selectively bred to produce a rabbit with a more upright stance and fine bone structure. In England, the Britannia Petite is still called a Polish Rabbit; because the ABRA already recognizes a breed by that name, it is referred to in America as the Britannia Petite.A dwarf-sized rabbit, the Britannia Petite will weigh between two and two-and-a-half pounds at full size. Active, if a little nervous, Britannias prefer the outdoors and can even be trained to jump obstacles, thanks in part to their arched body type.This breed has a short, soft coat in four color varieties: the Red Eyed White, the Blue Eyed White, Black/Sable, and Chestnut.

Beveren Rabbits as Pets

There is some debate about whether the Beveren Rabbit originated in Beveren, Belgium, or England. A large rabbit, weighing eight to twelve pounds at adulthood, the Beveren has a mandolin, or semi-arch body type, and a life expectancy of between five and ten years.The Beveren Rabbit has a short, dense coat of soft fur. The breed comes in various colors, though only three are recognized by the American Rabbit Breeders Association: solid blue, solid black, and blue-eyed white.Intelligent, docile, and curious, the Beveren Rabbit prefers the outdoors and loves to explore.

Lilac Rabbits as Pets

H. Onslow Cambridge first exhibited the Lilac Rabbit in the early 1900s, and the breed was introduced in the United States and Canada in 1926, where it quickly caused a splash.A medium-sized rabbit, the Lilac weighs between six and eight pounds when mature and has a compact body shape. The breed has a generous lifespan of nine to twelve years on average.The Lilac Rabbit has a coat of short, soft fur colored a beautiful lavender or lilac hue. These docile and friendly beauties are gentle and prefer to be kept outdoors.

Blanc De Hotot Rabbits as Pets

A larger-sized rabbit, the Blanc De Hotot will grow to weigh between eight and eleven pounds by adulthood. The breed as we know it today was perfected in Hotot-En-Auge, Normandy by Euginie Bernhard.The Blanc de Hotot boasts a short coat of soft white fur and dark brown circles around the eyes, known as “eyeliner.”Active, friendly, and affectionate, Blanc de Hotot Rabbits make wonderful pets. Like all domesticated rabbits, though, they should be socialized as early as possible. This breed prefers the outdoors but is sensitive to extreme heat and cold.

English Spot Rabbits as Pets

One of the world’s oldest surviving rabbit breeds, the English Spot has been around since the mid-1800s and was first introduced to North America in 1910. English Spot Rabbits are a medium-sized breed, weighing five to seven pounds as adults. Friendly and curious, English Spots have a full arched body and an average life expectancy of five to nine years.English Spots have beautiful coats of short, dense fur and come in various colors, including black, blue, turquoise, chocolate, gray, lilac, and gold. There are markings on the English Spot, too, such as butterfly-shaped markings around their noses, eye-circles, cheek spots, colored ears, and spots down the spine.This sweet, affectionate breed makes a great pet but prefers to live outdoors.

American Blue/White Rabbits as Pets

Bred in 1917 by Lewis H Salisbury of Pasadena, California, the American Rabbit is a medium to large-sized, arch-bodied breed that should grow to between nine and twelve pounds. Quiet and docile, the American Rabbit will live an average of eight to twelve years.The American Rabbit comes in two varieties, American Blue and American White, named for their soft, satiny fur colors.While normally calm and docile to the point of laziness, American Rabbits are skittish around people, making them less desirable as an indoor or family pet. Nor does this breed take well to being handled, especially by inexperienced hands, so this is not a good choice of rabbit for a child.

Gotland Rabbits as Pets

Indigenous to Sweden, the Gotland Rabbit developed naturally over time. Modern Gotlands are descendants of Rabbits discovered on Gotland Island in the 1970s. Today, there are breeding programs to keep this breed from becoming extinct.Gotlands are medium-sized rabbits with compact bodies. The Gotland should weigh between six-and-a-half and eight-and-one-half pounds at maturity and has an average life expectancy of nine years.This breed has fine, usually straight short coats that may be nearly any color. Likewise, Gotland Rabbits may have any color eyes.

Deilenaar Rabbits as Pets

First exhibited by a Mr. Ridderhof in Deli, Netherlands, the Deilenaar is a compact, medium-sized breed that grows to between five and seven pounds. Like the Gotland Rabbit, the average lifespan of a Deilenaar is nine years.Deilenaar Rabbits boast distinctively-colored dense, silky, medium-length coats. The base coat is a rich slate gray, while the intermediate color is a rusty brown. Finally, like the finishing coat on a layered painting, there’s the stunning red agouti fur featuring ticking and mackereling of black.Friendly and lively, Deilenaars are a great choice of pet. They can be lively and prefer to live outdoors, though, and are therefore recommended for experienced rabbit owners.

American Fuzzy Lop Rabbits as Pets

When Holland Lops were bred with French Angora Rabbits to produce a long-haired Lop, the result was a breed that possessed a recessive gene for a long coat. In other words, only a very few long-haired lops could be bred this way. Patty Green-Karl is credited with having developed the long-haired cuties that displayed the recessive gene into the breed as it is known today.A dwarf-sized, compact-bodied rabbit, the American Fuzzy Lop will weigh between three-and-one-half and four pounds fully grown. The coat of this breed is actually wool and can be made into yarn. All American Fuzzy Lops have distinctive markings on their noses, circles around their eyes, and tinted ears.Known to be active, playful, and curious, the American Fuzzy Lop makes an adorable and affectionate pet. Like many rabbit breeds that prefer to live indoors, the American Fuzzy Lop likes ample time to romp and explore the outdoors, supervised, of course!

Holland Lop Rabbits as Pets

One of the most popular rabbit breeds worldwide, the adorable Holland Lop is a dwarf-sized rabbit with a compact body. At maturity, this breed will weigh between two and four pounds. Bred by Adriann de Cock in the 1950s, the Holland Lop has a lifespan of seven to fourteen years.The Holland Lop Rabbit sports a dense, glossy, smooth coat that may be solid or broken in color. Solid-colored Holland Lops are either chestnut, chocolate, or chinchilla in hue, whereas the broken-colored variety comes in tortoise, seal, or sable mixtures.Curious and affectionate, the Holland Lop makes an excellent pet for first-time rabbit owners. Though they prefer to live indoors, they enjoy time outside. Just be sure and keep an eye on your Holland Lop when you let them explore the outdoors.See our lop eared rabbits care guide.

German Lop Rabbits as Pets

Bred in Germany and recognized as a distinct breed in 1970, the German Lop is a large rabbit, weighing between six and eight pounds at adulthood. This docile breed has a life expectancy of between nine and twelve years.The German Lop has medium-length, dense fur that is recognized in the following range of different and exciting color varieties:TheDocile and affectionate, German Lops make great pets for first time rabbit owners, and for families with children.

Continental Gian Rabbits as Pets

A giant-sized rabbit with a mandolin, or semi-arched body type, the Continental Giant can grow to weigh anywhere from thirteen pounds to thirty-five-plus pounds. These friendly, docile rabbits will live, on average, from four to seven years.The Continental Giant is one of the world’s oldest surviving rabbit breeds, having been around since the sixteenth century. They descended from the Belgian Hare and Belgium’s Flemish Giant Rabbits.Sometimes referred to as “Contis” by their doting owners, Continentals have dense, thick coats of beautiful glossy fur. The breed comes in various colors, including white, light gray, steel grey, fawn, sandy, and black.Obviously adorable, the Continental is also very smart. Pet Continentals have been known to play games, learn tricks, and even respond to their names. This breed prefers to live indoors but needs plenty of space due to its large size.See our caring guide for giant rabbits.

Hulstlander Rabbits as Pets

First exhibited in 1977 Netherlands by J de Graaf, the Hulstlander is a small to medium-sized rabbit with a compact body. This striking breed weighs between five and six pounds at maturity and has an eight-to-ten year lifespan.The Hulstlander’s luxuriant coat of dense, soft fur is white, displaying no off-white or yellowing of any kind.Playful and intelligent, this breed enjoys being social and loves to be the center of attention. Hustlanders do best with a near-constant companion and dislike long stretches alone, making them wonderful pets for owners with lots of time, love, and attention to give.

English Lop Rabbits as Pets

The English Lop was first noted in England in the mid-1800s, but the breed may have its origins in Africa. A medium-sized rabbit with a semi-arched body and distinctive oversized ears, the English Lop should weigh nine or ten pounds fully grown and has a life expectancy of five to seven years.English Lops have smooth, short coats that may be one of many colors, both broken and solid. They may be white, fawn, chinchilla, or blue, among other less popular colors.Curious and friendly, English Lops make lovable pets. They like to be picked up and petted and will remain playful throughout their lives.While English Lops are not prone to any particular diseases, this breed can develop health problems if their large ears aren’t adequately cared for. It would be best if you inspected your English Lop’s ears at least once a week to be sure wax isn’t building up. Also, it’s essential to keep its nails trimmed short, as this breed tends to step on its ears.

New Zealand Rabbits as Pets

The New Zealand Rabbit is not from New Zealand; it was, in fact, bred in the United States by crossing Belgian Hares and Flemish Giant Rabbits. A large-sized breed, New Zealands will weigh between ten and twelve pounds when fully grown. A suitable pet for rabbit lovers of all experience levels, New Zealands will live, on average, between five and eight years.Sporting chic coats of short, soft fur, New Zealands come in various colors, five of which have been recognized by ARBA: red, white, black, blue, and broken.Even-tempered, affectionate, and good with children, New Zealand’s enjoy sitting on their owner’s lap and being pet.

Brazilian Rabbits as Pets

Native to South America and Brazil, in particular, Brazilian rabbits may have been brought from Europe by Portuguese sailors. Brazilians are medium-sized rabbits, weighing between seven and eleven pounds at maturity.Brazilian Rabbits have dense fur with thick undercoats. They vary in color, though most are shades of blue, black, and opal.Social, gentle, and calm, Brazilians make great pets. They’re friendly and get along well with other pets. The breed is prone to infection and colds, though, so be sure not to expose your Brazilian to drafts or sudden temperature variations.

Flemish Giant Rabbits as Pets

As the breed’s name would imply, Flemish Giants are large rabbits, weighing between fourteen and twenty-one pounds. They have semi-arched bodies and coats of gorgeous thick, glossy fur.The ARBA recognizes seven colors of Flemish Giant: black, blue, fawn, light gray, sandy, steel gray, and white.Flemish Giants are excellent companion pets if you’ve got the room to accommodate a large, indoor rabbit. They are affectionate and enjoy lap-sitting, but a word to the wise: Flemish Giants grow nervous quickly if mishandled, so they may not be ideal for small children.See our Flemish giant care guide.

Alaska Rabbits as Pets

Question: Where did the Alaska Rabbit originate? If you almost answered “Alaska,” then remembered the New Zealand Rabbit and smelled a trap, good for you! This breed was actually developed in Germany by Rabbit Judge Max Goth and named for the Alaskan Fox, whose coat he was trying to emulate with his new rabbit.First exhibited in Europe in 1907, Alaska Rabbits are medium-sized, weighing between seven and nine pounds as adults. This intelligent, friendly breed will live between seven and ten years and have dense coats of long, glossy hair.Alaska Rabbits are great pets for people who have children or other pets, as they are friendly, outgoing, and calm. Be sure to give your Alaska plenty of together time, as they love being with people.

Silver Fox Rabbits as Pets

When Walter B Garland of Ohio crossed Checkered Giants, Champagne de Argents, English Silvers, and American Blue Rabbits, he developed the second domestic rabbit breed to originate in America. Recognized by ARBA in 1925, the breed was initially called the American Silver.A large rabbit with a life expectancy of five to eight years, the Silver Fox will grow to weigh between nine and twelve pounds. A scarce breed of domestic rabbit, the Silver Fox has what’s called a “standing coat,” which means it stands upright rather than lying flat. While the breed comes in many colors, only black Silver Foxes are recognized by ARBA.The Silver Fox is even-tempered and calm, making it a great choice of pet for families with children who have enough room to accommodate a large rabbit.