Best Food for Betta Fish?

They never hesitate when they see food, even if it means stealing from fellow tank mates. Although with Bettas it may seem like they will eat anything, in reality, this isnt true.

Keep on reading as we address all these important questions, review the best Betta fish food and more Flakes are the most popular Betta fish food– they provide just enough nutrients and are found in almost any pet store.

They are designed to include all the main nutrition that your fish need, but they are less nutritious than freshly prepared or live foods. For that reason, flakes should not be the primary food source, and it is worth looking at some of the other options available. Flakes can be a good fit for the Betta diet, but they should be given less often than other types of food.

You can periodically include and exclude flakes from their diet, swapping them out for other foods. Pellets are the most effective choice for Bettas and can be used as a daily source of food. Unlike flakes, they are higher quality and can be found in most local pet stores.

Many pellets are sold in small cans with a lid, and some even including leaflet with feeding instructions. They are not as nutritious as either live or frozen foods, but they have a slightly higher nutritional value than flakes and pellets. Live foods will often be more expensive, found in fewer places and will require specific storage conditions.

Live food is quite a broad term and includes anything from invertebrates to worms and shrimps. Watch out for filler ingredients such as wheat flour and rice meal. Otherwise, granules that stay at the bottom will begin to dissolve and affect the quality of the water.

Fish of their size dont require much energy, so feeding them twice a day should be enough. Other than that, it is a good idea to sometimes give your fish a break and allow their digestive system to get rid of any toxins and process everything you can choose a day every week or two. In the wild, they will typically eat small meaty creatures such as worms, daphnia, bloodworms, brine shrimp, mosquito larvae and other fish.

In captivity, a Bettas diet needs to be high in protein, meaning they need plenty of meat. Most of the foods which they like to eat in the wild can be bought in live or frozen form for your aquarium. These fish can have trouble fitting larger granules in their mouth.

Overfeeding can lead to sickness, discomfort for the fish and an unpleasant appearance. It is the main cause of problems with the digestive system and significantly impacts the ability of your fish to swim normally. Symptoms of constipation include a bloated stomach, not creating much fecal waste and not wanting to eat.

Their diet is mainly built around meaty protein rich foods. Remember to keep an eye on portion sizes to avoid overfeeding, as it can have severe consequences for the health of your fish.

Are pellets or flakes better for bettas?

Betta fish enjoy eating pellets. … The pellets will sink after time, so make sure that you give just enough food to ensure any extra food does not fowl the tank. Flakes. Betta fish do not always like flakes.

What human food can betta fish eat?

Boiled Peas. Boiled peas with the shell removed can be eaten by Betta fish. ….Lettuce. Cucumber and lettuce are also good things to feed your Betta fish. ….Spinach. Some lightly boiled or microwaved spinach will work too. ….Sweet Corn. ….Chicken. ….Seafood. ….Fruit. ….Crackers.

Not all betta fish are created equal. Some are born with bottomless stomachs like a miniature shark, and others are picky eaters who turn their noses up to everything you offer. If you have the latter type, this refusal to eat can be quite stressful. Fortunately, there are many high quality, high protein foods you can try feeding them to whet their appetites.

In the United States, our favorite brand to purchase is Hikari since their bloodworms are of the highest quality and feed out very cleanly. While the expiration date may still be good, the food will grow old and stale from repeated exposure to moisture and oxygen and can potentially cause health problems with your betta fish.

It contains high amounts of quality protein, as well as other essential vitamins and minerals to boost your bettas health.

If youre wondering what betta fish food, or how much and how often, youre not alone. Surprisingly this is one of the most frequent questions when it comes to first-time betta keeping, and overfeeding is very common! To further complicate things, its not always wise to rely on the information from pet stores or on the food product labels either.

Live, freeze-dried, or frozen foods can be used as treats or implemented into their daily feeding routine too. To keep your betta happy and healthy please follow each food and feeding guideline below as these tips could literally save your fishs life:

The best betta food replicates these specific dietary needs without a lot of added and indigestible fillers. Its best then, to provide a variety of high-quality pellets, flakes, freeze dried, frozen and live foods . Providing the best nutritional value focuses on a bettas need of protein, fat, fiber, phosphorus, carbohydrates, calcium, and vitamins (A, D3, E, K, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, C, H, M).

Betta fish have very short digestive tracts and do not process fillers like corn and wheat very well. These fillers are often found in many pellet and flake foods and can lead to excess bloat and digestive issues (e.g. constipation). Pellets are the most common betta fish food on the market, with quality varying greatly across each.

This can cause bloating and digestive issues if youre not careful as theyll expand in your bettas stomach. For pellets that expand once wet, soak them in tank water before feeding to hydrate them, especially if your betta attacks food instantly. PictureNameAnalysisProsConsPriceRating NorthFin Betta Bits -Crude Protein (min): 45%-No fillers or hormones-No dyes or artificial coloring

– May be hard to find, except online$$$$5.0 New Life Spectrum Betta Formula -Crude Protein (min): 37%-Color enhancing ingredients-High-quality ingredients $$3.8 Aqueon Betta Food -Crude Protein (min): 38%-Small pellet size-Comes in color enhancing blend Freeze dried foods have been stripped of their moisture and have added fillers to keep them stable.

Its recommended that you soak them in tank water before feeding to rehydrate them, increasing the moisture content. Feeding only freeze dried food can lead to bloating and constipation issues . One large benefit to freeze dried foods, however, is they are free of bacteria and parasites.They are also easy to find at local fish stores and online and are relatively inexpensive.

Betta fish are carnivores and they get increasingly aggressive during feedings when they have to stalk their prey. A staple in their natural habitat, mosquito larvae are an excellent betta food option. While they may be hard to source during the winter months, mosquitos and their larvae are very active and abundant during spring and summer and in warmer climates.

Purchase a starter culture and harvest them yourself, or find a reputable local or online store that carries them. Brine shrimp are packed with the nutritional needs that betta fish need to thrive on (proteins, vitamins, and amino acids), and theyre easy to raise too. They can also be found at most local fish stores, making them a good option for varying up your bettas diet.

Bloodworms or Glycera are the larvae of the midge fly and can be found in pools and ponds of water. Betta fish commonly gorge on them in the wild, making them ideal variations for even the pickiest of eaters. Bettas put on a big show when going after these guys, but they shouldnt be used as the exclusive source of food because they lack amino acids.

Have you ever left bananas, apples or other fruit out in your kitchen, and all of a sudden theres swarms of little bugs flying around them? Instead, there is a wingless and flightless variety that is ideal for feeding betta fish and can even be bred and harvested in a small container inexpensively. Pay no attention to the amount and instructions on the side of the betta fish food can.

Overfeeding and overeating can lead to constipation , bloating, obesity (thats right betta fish can get fat), swim bladder problems , contracting diseases because of the bacteria feeding on the excess food breaking down, and even death. Always clean up any excess food that falls to the bottom of the tank with an aquarium designated turkey baster. This will prevent ammonia buildup and the potential for harmful diseases being present from food decay.

Its also a good idea to not feed your betta one day per week, this gives their digestive tract time to fully process food and it limits problems associated with overeating. If your betta fish wont eat or seems completely uninterested in food dont worry. A lack of appetite may mean that they are not hungry or have recently undergone some type of stress (e.g. tank cleaning, new home, abrupt water temperature changes).

Cold water that is outside of the recommended range of 76-81 degrees Fahrenheit may also cause your betta to act lethargic and will slow their metabolism . Just like when we are sick, betta fish also wont have big appetites while they are ill. Make sure to monitor for signs of illness and disease , and initiate the proper treatments as soon as possible. Thats a lot of information to digest, but as a betta keeper, it is our responsibility to make sure they have a well-balanced diet for optimal health.

Feeding a variety of different foods will provide the array of nutrients a betta fish needs to thrive. How much to feed your betta fish can depend on their individual activity level, but 2-3 pellets 1-2 times daily is a safe amount. Get in the habit of sticking to a regular feeding schedule so that you dont forget whether or not you fed them.

Please ask any questions you may still have about specific betta fish food and feeding procedures in the comments below.

Flakes

There are lots of different types of Betta fish food available.Here are all the different foods you can feed your Betta fish:

Pellets

Pellets are the most effective choice for Bettas and can be used as a daily source of food. Unlike flakes, they are higher quality and can be found in most local pet stores.They come in all sizes and colors.Many pellets are sold in small cans with a lid, and some even including leaflet with feeding instructions.Pellets are a similar price to flakes at around $6 per 1oz.

Freeze Dried Food

Freeze dried foods are the same foods that can be found with live foods, only all the moisture has been removed from the product.They are not as nutritious as either live or frozen foods, but they have a slightly higher nutritional value than flakes and pellets.Usually you are looking at spending about $6–$7, depending on what you buy. They are also suitable for daily use, which is important.

Frozen Food

This is the best type of Betta fish food and will meet your fish’s dietary needs and help them live long.However, it isn’t without it’s drawbacks (price, availability and maintenance). Live foods will often be more expensive, found in fewer places and will require specific storage conditions.With this variety of food also comes the variety in price – they will depend on what you decide to buy and where you buy it from. Worms tend to be one of the cheaper choices.

How To Read Fish Food Labels

These fish require a healthy balanced diet of meaty and plant-based foods.A standard container of Betta food should include all the required nutrients, but how do you know for certain? Well you are going to need to read about the actual content inside.It’s important to know that the ingredients will depend on the type of food you use. Ingredients will also vary by brand, as different manufacturers will use different things. This is important because it directly impacts the nutritional value of the food.The ingredients listed at the top of the list, indicate the weight of the ingredient used. So you need to choose a Betta fish food which has high protein content foods listed at the top – especially if you are breeding them. This will usually be any type of fish product.Let’s look at flakes as an example. Most of them will be made out of shrimp, worms or similar ingredients. Generally this is what the fish would eat in the wild.However, you should look out for any additional artificial enhancements that have been added. This will usually be indicated by a small note somewhere below the main ingredient list. Avoid food containing excessive amount of chemicals or preservatives.Although the main ingredients should be protein based, any good diet should be well balanced. It should contain a fair portion of other nutrients, like fats and fiber. Buying something containing a high amount of one ingredient is not a good idea.Watch out for filler ingredients such as wheat flour and rice meal.Remember if you’re concerned about the ingredients you can always make your own fish food.

How To Feed Your Betta Fish

To keep your fish as healthy as possible, it’s important that you not only understand what fish eat,

How Much Should You Feed Your Betta?

Unfortunately, fish are not capable of regulating their own appetite. In the wild they often have empty stomachs, and are constantly looking for prey. This contradicts the popular myth among aquarists that fish know when they are full.There is an easy way to figure out the suitable portion size. When you feed them, watch how much the fish eats in two minutes. If your fish likes to take his time, allow up to five minutes.Remember that the portion will depend upon the food itself (the portion size for pellets and granules will vary).Another golden rule you can follow is: the size of a portion should be equal to about 5% of the Betta’s body size.All the food that ends up at the bottom of the tank should be removed.Otherwise, granules that stay at the bottom will begin to dissolve and affect the quality of the water. It can be toxic and will degrade the water quality, which can eventually lead to health complications in fish.There is also another golden rule you can follow: the size of a portion should be equal to 5% of the Betta’s body size.

What Do Betta Fish Eat?

Bettas are carnivorous fish that need lots of protein in their diet. In the wild, they will typically eat small meaty creatures such as worms, daphnia, bloodworms, brine shrimp, mosquito larvae and other fish.In captivity, a Betta’s diet needs to be high in protein, meaning they need plenty of meat.Most of the foods which they like to eat in the wild can be bought in live or frozen form for your aquarium. You might also want to feed them copepods, white worms, glass worms and fruit flies.

My Betta Fish Is Not Eating?

In most cases fish will not eat because of sickness, but sometimes other factors come into play.For example, the Betta might not enjoy a particular type of food.These fish can have trouble fitting larger granules in their mouth. If that’s the case, consider either grating the foods or buying smaller ones.

What Happens If I Overfeed My Betta?

Overfeeding can lead to sickness, discomfort for the fish and an unpleasant appearance. It is the main cause of problems with the digestive system and significantly impacts the ability of your fish to swim normally.Fortunately overfeeding is very easy to spot – their abdomens will become really oblate.

Is My Betta Fish Bloated?

If your Betta Fish is bloated, it’s likely that they are constipated.Unfortunately constipation is common with Betta Fish. Symptoms of constipation include a bloated stomach, not creating much fecal waste and not wanting to eat.The main cause of constipation is over feeding. This is why it’s really important to stick to a feeding schedule.To treat this just fast him for a couple of days until the bloating has gone down. Then resume feeding, but make sure you are feeding less than you originally were.

Frozen Bloodworms

Given that betta fish eat small insects, crustaceans, and other meaty foods in the wild, frozen bloodworms (the bright red larva of midge flies) are one of the best foods you can provide them. Sold at most local pet stores, they typically come in a package of foil-sealed individual cubes or a frozen slab that you can break off pieces from. In the United States, our favorite brand to purchase is Hikari since their bloodworms are of the highest quality and feed out very cleanly.Typically, one betta fish cannot finish an entire cube in one sitting, so you may need to thaw out the cube in a container and feed a few bloodworms using a pipette or tweezers. Most betta fish would be happy to live off a diet of only bloodworms, but like humans, your fish requires a variety in nutrition. Rotate between at least two to three different foods to make sure they get all the necessary vitamins and nutrients to live a long and healthy life.

Live Blackworms

Live foods are considered the cream of the crop when it comes to the betta fish food options because they most closely resemble their actual diet in nature. We recommend live blackworms because as a true freshwater species, they can live for quite a while in your aquarium without fouling the water. They like to burrow into the substrate, which provides hours of enrichment for your betta fish as he hunts them down one by one.This disadvantage of live blackworms is that they are not always available at local fish stores and they have the possibility of bringing in parasites. However, we still highly recommend them, given how nutritious and mentally stimulating they are for bettas. Just make sure to get the blackworms from a reputable fish store that keeps them refrigerated in clean, odorless water.

Betta Pellets

While pellets may not be the most natural-looking choice, they combine the most important nutrients a betta fish needs into a bite-sized package. Betta food pellets are nice because they don’t tend to dissolve quickly in the water and they generally float at the surface (which is preferred since bettas have upturned mouths and are used to eating from the water surface).Xtreme Betta PelletsWe like Xtreme Betta Pellets because they contain high-quality proteins like krill, come with a handy scoop to avoid overfeeding, and are packaged in a small container that’s ideal for keeping one betta fish. In general, you don’t want to buy a huge jar of fish food and use it for multiple years. While the expiration date may still be good, the food will grow old and stale from repeated exposure to moisture and oxygen and can potentially cause health problems with your betta fish.

Freeze-Dried Foods

Freeze drying is a method of preserving food in a lightweight, dry form factor while retaining as much of the original nutrients and taste as possible. Therefore, we love using freeze-dried bloodworms and brine shrimp as an alternative to frozen foods. Unlike frozen foods, they do not need to be stored in a freezer, and they tend to float at the top of the water. Also, they’re easy to portion out for appropriate-sized feedings and can be easily removed from the tank if your betta fish doesn’t finish everything.Hikari Freeze-Dried Bloodworms

Best Betta Fish Food: Dietary Requirements

Betta fish are classified as carnivores, and eat insects in the wild. The best betta food replicates these specific dietary needs without a lot of added and indigestible fillers. For most betta keepers it may not be possible to source or provide live foods as a betta fish’s main diet. It’s best then, to
Betta fish have very short digestive tracts and do not process fillers like corn and wheat very well. These fillers are often found in many pellet and flake foods and can lead to excess bloat and digestive issues (e.g. constipation). Betta’s receive no nutritional benefit from fillers and just pass them off as waste. It’s very important you provide foods high in protein to satisfy their carnivorous needs. Fiber and moisture are also important to aid their digestion.

Betta Fish Pellets

Pellets are the most common betta fish food on the market, with quality varying greatly across each. The best pellets for betta fish will have fewer fillers and more high-quality ingredients that help fish thrive. Some betta fish pellets expand significantly after they are exposed to water.This can cause bloating and digestive issues if you’re not careful as they’ll expand in your betta’s stomach. For

Freeze-Dried Betta Food

Freeze dried food is a great option to introduce some of the betta’s natural food into their diet, but it does not replace the quality of live or frozen foods. Freeze dried foods have been stripped of their moisture and have added fillers to keep them stable.It’s recommended that you soak them in tank water before feeding to rehydrate them, increasing the moisture content.One large benefit to freeze dried foods, however, is they are free of bacteria and parasites.They are also easy to find at local fish stores and online and are relatively inexpensive. They store well and often come in your typical fish food containers.

Betta Fish Flakes

There are specific flakes made specifically for betta fish. Do not feed your betta other tropical fish flakes because they lack the protein requirements bettas need. Betta flakes can be a staple in regular feedings, but they can also be very messy. Excess or sunken flakes should be removed immediately after feeding. Betta fish often refuse to eat flakes as well.

Live & Frozen Betta Food

If you’ve never fed your betta anything other than pellets then you and your betta are missing out. Betta fish are carnivores and they get increasingly aggressive during feedings when they have to stalk their prey. This is also the best way to replicate their natural habitat and food sources.Some are harder to source than others but make for a balanced diet.Frozen foods come in many of the same options. It’s a great alternative to keeping live food. Frozen betta food may be kept in your freezer until you’re ready to defrost and feed them to your betta. Only take as much as you need placing the rest back into the freezer to prevent thawing. Never refreeze any food that has been thawed as it could have been exposed to bacteria.These options below are a betta’s favorites:

Live/Frozen Mosquito Larvae

A staple in their natural habitat, mosquito larvae are an excellent betta food option. While they may be hard to source during the winter months, mosquitos and their larvae are very active and abundant during spring and summer and in warmer climates. Purchase a starter culture and harvest them yourself, or find a reputable local or online store that carries them.

Live/Frozen Brine Shrimp

Brine shrimp are an aquatic crustacean that betta fish love. The photo above is zoomed in, from the University of Utah, they only grow up to 1 centimeter as adults. Brine shrimp are packed with the nutritional needs that betta fish need to thrive on (proteins, vitamins, and amino acids), and they’re easy to raise too. They can also be found at most local fish stores, making them a good option for varying up your betta’s diet.

Live/Frozen Bloodworms

Bloodworms or Glycera are the larvae of the midge fly and can be found in pools and ponds of water. Betta fish commonly gorge on them in the wild, making them ideal variations for even the pickiest of eaters. Betta’s put on a big show when going after these guys, but they shouldn’t be used as the exclusive source of food because they lack amino acids. They are high in iron content, resulting in their bright red coloring. If you can’t handle the live option (they are pretty gross looking), they also come in a gel or freeze-dried option.

Live/Frozen Wingless Fruit Flies

Also known as the vinegar fly, the common fruit fly is something you are probably very familiar with. Have you ever left bananas, apples or other fruit out in your kitchen, and all of a sudden there’s swarms of little bugs flying around them? Those are fruit flies and betta fish love them because they are insectivores. While you can technically drop them in for feeding, you don’t know what diseases they may have and they may fly out. Instead, there is a wingless and flightless variety that is ideal for feeding betta fish and can even be bred and harvested in a small container inexpensively.

Live/Frozen Mysis Shrimp

Mysis shrimp, or opossum shrimp, are another great option for betta fish because of their exoskeleton. This exterior is rich in fiber, which aids the digestion of protein-rich foods. If your betta fish is a picky eater, these guys might do the trick for some variety. They are packed with betta-loving nutrients, more so than brine shrimp, and are also high in moisture and amino acids.

Ideal Feeding Schedule:

Adult bettas can be fed once per day, and babies (fry) can be fed twice per day. It might not seem like enough, but many pellets expand to more than 2X their size once they get wet. To put this into further perspective,Bettas will overeat if you let them. Overfeeding and overeating can lead to constipation, bloating, obesity (that’s right betta fish can get fat), swim bladder problems, contracting diseases because of the bacteria feeding on the excess food breaking down, and even death.

What If Your Betta Fish Won’t Eat?

If your betta fish won’t eat or seems completely uninterested in food don’t worry. A lack of appetite may mean that they are not hungry or have recently undergone some type of stress (e.g. tank cleaning, new home, abrupt water temperature changes). Again, don’t worry about a couple days because bettas can survive up to 14 days without food.Cold water that is outside of the recommended range of 76-81 degrees Fahrenheit may also cause your betta to act lethargic and will slow their metabolism. A lower metabolism means they will need fewer feedings. As betta fish get older they will also be less active and may eat less frequently, this is normal.Once a betta recovers, their appetite will also begin to come back too. As mentioned above bettas can be picky too.