Best Dogs for Older People?

If you’re an older adult interested in getting a dog, age alone should not be a factor that should prevent you from dog ownership. However, factors related to your health and lifestyle can affect your ability to care for a dog properly. With so many dogs out there, you can find the type of dog that best fits your lifestyle and abilities, regardless of your age. As with any age dog owner, you need to make sure you can meet your dog’s needs like exercise, grooming, and health care. Certain dog breeds are ideal for a more relaxed lifestyle. Also, keep in mind that dogs can live from 10 to 15 years; factor their lifespan in your plans.

The best dog breeds for seniors have moderate energy levels, and most are smaller. A senior citizen who has moved to smaller living quarters in a retirement community usually does not have ample space for a larger, more energetic pup.

Look at breeds that make great companions and adapt well to the lifestyles of their owners. The fluffy little bichon frise is a joyful and affectionate dog that makes an excellent companion. With an average weight of about 7 to 12 pounds, most people can handle this small breed easily.

Many bichon owners take their dogs to a professional groomer every month or two. Moderate daily exercise is usually enough to keep the bichon healthy and happy as long as it has companionship. Coat and Color: Fluffy and curly white hair (may have traces of apricot, buff, or cream), resembling a cotton ball or powder puff

This breed typically weighs about 11 to 18 pounds and is easy to handle and train. The Cavalier has some grooming needs, such as regular hair brushing, ear cleaning, and possibly the occasional trip to a groomer. Overall, Cavaliers are favored among those who love small companion dogs that are well-suited for apartment living.

Coat and Color: Medium-length silky, wavy coat; adults have feathering on their ears, chest, legs, feet, and tail; four-color varieties including tricolor, blenheim, ruby, and black and tan Their grooming needs are relatively minimal, but be aware of health concerns like brachycephalic syndrome and various skin issues. They are usually very responsive to training and easy to handle, even though most weigh about 60 to 80 pounds.

If you like larger dogs but worry about handling one, the greyhound is a breed to consider. Much like the bichon, a Maltese is the quintessential little white lap dog. This breed enjoys spending time in its owner’s lap and going on short, easy walks.

If you want a small to medium dog that makes a great companion, the corgi might be for you. Weighing 24 to 30 pounds, this breed is still small enough for most people to handle. A herding dog by nature, corgis need routine exercise, but daily walks are sufficient.

Coat and Color: Medium length double coat in black and tan, red, sable, or fawn (all colors are typically seen with white markings) If you’re leaning toward a tiny dog , a 3- to 7-pound Pom is another easy-to-handle pooch that you can carry in your bag. Your Pom will like snoozing in your lap and playing with toys.

Poodles learn fast and adapt well to all kinds of households. Ranging in weight from 9 to 16 pounds, the breed is easy to handle. Though the shih tzu has a bit of a stubborn streak, most can be trained without too much trouble.

The shih tzu is somewhat prone to skin issues and brachycephalic syndrome but less than the French bulldog. If you are a grandparent that likes to keep feeding your grandchildren to the point they can’t move anymore, a pug might not be a good fit. They will not stop eating and are prone to becoming overweight ; overeating can lead to health problems for this pup.

It’s also an intensely loving breed; it’s content to sit in your lap or give you kisses if you let them. Their smaller, compact size makes them easier to tote around town and take on walks. But, if you are concerned about being able to keep up with an energetic dog as time goes by, you may want to choose a calmer, loungy breed.

What is the best dog breed for an older person?

Poodle. The poodle is a remarkably intelligent dog that is easy to train and eager to please. ….Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. These wonderful pups make great companion dogs. ….Cocker Spaniel. ….French Bulldog. ….Pembroke Welsh Corgi. ….Pomeranian. ….Shih Tzu. ….Havanese.

What's the most low-maintenance dog?

Basset Hound. You’ll recognize a Basset Hound when you see one, those ears stand out. ….Boston Terrier. Boston Terriers are friendly, happy dogs that make great city pets. ….Brussels Griffon. ….Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. ….Chihuahua. ….Chinese Crested. ….Dachshund. ….French Bulldog.

What is the easiest low-maintenance dog?

Though quite energetic, Russell Terriers make a great pet for those looking for a low-maintenance dog. They’re fast learners who adapt well to new environments. Minimal grooming and regular visits to the vet make Russell Terriers a fairly easy breed to maintain.

A retired pet parent has its perks for the dog, too! Many seniors are home much of the day or simply have a more flexible schedule, meaning more time to devote to their best friend.

For instance, spending time with a pup can help lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels while raising serotonin (feel-good chemicals in the brain), according to . While compatible furry friends can be found in any breed, age, or size, adopting a calm and already-trained older dog is a common option for senior pet parents.

Temperament: The Shih Tzu is an affectionate dog who enjoys spending time with their pet parentwhether its cuddling or accompanying them throughout the house. Grooming : Shih Tzus are low shedding, but daily brushing and an occasional professional trim help them look their sweet, perky best. Exercise: The Shih Tzu is up for a daily walk if its pet parent is, and this lapdog is more than happy to enjoy down time for the rest of the day.

Because of their flat face and small nostrils, the Pugs breathing can be affected by extremely hot or cold weather conditions. Temperament: Loving and loyal, Pugs are devoted to their pet parents and enjoy taking naps (they tend to snore while doing so!). Fun Fact: A group of Pugs is called a grumble, likely because of the snorting and nasal sounds they make, according to The Daily Wag!

For more active seniors who enjoy outdoor exploration such as walking on nature trails, the lively and adventurous Pembroke Welsh Corgioften referred to as the Corgiis a great match. With their cute little legs and sparkly eyes, Corgis win over the hearts of children, adults, and elder folks alike. This energetic breed is prone to barking when left alone too long or if they dont receive sufficient dog exercise .

Temperament: Poodles are loyal companions who form strong bonds with multiple family members, so they especially thrive with couples. Fun Fact: Though it is believed to have originated in Germany, the Poodle is recognized as the national dog of France because of its citizens deep admiration for this breed, according to PetMD . If it werent for them, Frenchies would have been bred to have rose-shaped earsears that fold back at the midway point, vaguely resembling the shape of a rose.

Like Shih Tzus, Miniature Schnauzers are patient with children and enjoy playtime, making them compatible with grandkids as well! Because the Miniature Schnauzer was bred to hunt rodents and other small animals on farms, their beard offered a line of defense against these creatures if they fought back. Exercise: The slender, long Greyhound is a sprinter who benefits from a fenced-in yard or enclosed area where they can take off in bursts of speed.

Temperament: Lively but gentle, the smart Maltese enjoys playtime and is more than happy to entertain others with its cool dog tricks . Fun Fact: Believed to have originated in Maltaan island off the southern coast of Italythe Maltese is the oldest of the Toy Group breeds from Europe, according to Animal Planet . Its hard to go wrong with the noble Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, or Cavalier. This adaptable pup willingly fits right into anyones lifestyleincluding that of a senior pet parent!

Welcoming to people of all ages and other pets, cheerful Cavaliers have an easy time making friends and winning over fans. Fun Fact: Named after King Charles II who adored these dogs, Cavaliers were said to tag along with the British monarch everywhere he went, from state meetings to his castle, according to the American Kennel Club .

For older adults, caring for a dog can provide a sense of purpose and a source of joy. Whether you live on your own or in a 55+ community, your canine friend can keep you company throughout the day, helping you ward off loneliness, stress, and even anxiety and depression. They also can motivate you to stay active and exercise frequently, which is beneficial for your physical and emotional well-being.

Whether you live on your own or in a 55+ community , your canine friend can keep you company throughout the day, helping you ward off loneliness, stress, and even anxiety and depression . Their curly-Q tails and squished noses make for an adorable companion, and will be perfectly happy curled up on the couch- with moderate activity and walks peppered in- beneficial to both pup and senior.

Be cognisant of the fact that Pugs don’t prefer high humidity, so opt for indoor exercise during the hotter Seattle summer days. It’s ideal to train your Golden initially to warn off unwanted behavior, but their reputation of love, loyalty, and desire to be wherever their people are has made them arguably the best furry companion you could ask for. Cavaliers are a smaller breed of spaniel typically about 12 to 18 pounds with a medium-length silky coat that are well-suited for living in an apartment or small house within a West Seattle retirement community .

The AKC describes Bichon’s as “operating under the assumption that there are no strangers, just friends they havent met yet,” making them ideal for those who enjoy frequent visitors to the home. You can expect a Yorkie to remain under 10 pounds, making them easy for seniors to pick up, walk on a leash, and hold in their lap.

Dogs can bring companionship, health benefits, and a little extra joy to seniors and retirees. Whether your loved one is at home or in an assisted living community, a furry friend can lower stress, prevent loneliness, provide purpose and routine, and lead to better heart health by encouraging them to exercise.

Whether your loved one is at home or in an assisted living community , a furry friend can lower stress, prevent loneliness, provide purpose and routine, and lead to better heart health by encouraging them to exercise. Just like people, dogs vary greatly in personality, size, exercise needs, and general care requirements.

Here are some of the top dog breeds for seniors based on information from the American Kennel Society . Quiet, charming, and easy to train, theyre known for their boundless energy and fun-loving ways, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA). Theyre easy to train, enjoy a variety of activities, and can adapt to different kinds of living environments.

Instead, theyre obedient and eager to please, and they want to be your best friend all qualities that make them one of the best dog breeds for elderly adults. Height: 12 to 14 inches Weight: 11 to 20 pounds Life expectancy: 12 to 15 years Average cost: $500 to $2,700 Temperament: spirited, trainable, loveable Hair: hypoallergenic, infrequent shedding Theyre small companion animals, and although they can be stubborn at times, they tend to be extremely social and devoted to their owners.

Height: 10 to 13 inches Weight: 14 to 18 pounds Life expectancy: 13 to 15 years Average cost: $600 to $1,500 Temperament: delightful, comical, charming Hair: sheds coat frequently, requires facial skin folds to be cleaned with a damp cloth and wiped dry French bulldog French bulldogs are among the best dogs for seniors because theyre adaptable, extremely kind, easy to groom, and dont require excessive walks its no wonder theyre one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States! Height: 11 to 13 inches Weight: under 28 pounds Life expectancy: 10 to 12 years Average cost: $1,500 to $3,000 Temperament: easygoing, patient, affectionate Hair: infrequent shedding

Pomeranians may bark more than other breeds but not excessively and make excellent alert animals. Height: 6 to 7 inches Weight: 3 to 7 pounds Life expectancy: 12 to 16 years Average cost: $500 to $1,500 Temperament: vivacious, sociable, extroverted Hair: frequent and seasonal shedding While the options above are excellent choices for seniors and retirees, there are plenty more loving breeds to choose from.

Our g uide to pet-friendly assisted living features a sampling of senior communities, listed by city and state, where animal companions are welcome. Owners health: Does your loved one have mobility issues that may prevent a dog from getting proper exercise? While an older dogs calm temperament may be a good match for seniors, youll want to consider all the pros and cons.

For example, The Grey Muzzle Organization helps fund senior dog adoption nationwide. Less monitoring and training needed Calmer demeanor More likely to be house-trained Can be left alone for longer periods of time Defined personality and habits More likely to have shots and vaccines The biggest challenge with older pets including dogs is health issues, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association.

More likely to have arthritis, heart disease, cancer, kidney disease, or senility May have developed bad habits or poor social skills over time May have too little energy May require shots, special food, or help moving around Behavioral changes related to age, including irritability, anxiety, and increased vocalization No matter which four-legged friend you choose, spending time with a dog and asking questions about their medical history can help guide you to the perfect companion.

Tip

Dog ownership has many health and emotional benefits. Dog companionship has been known to reduce stress and lower blood pressure. Having a dog may even improve or prevent depression and anxiety. Plus, exercising with your dog is a great way to stay active.

Shih Tzu

The elegant Shih Tzu prospers with plenty of love and attention. This outgoing breed is also great with kids, making them a perfect playtime buddy when the grandchildren visit!Read more about the loyal Shih Tzu.

Pug

Pugs are the best dogs for seniors who prefer to curl up on the sofa with their beloved furry friend by their side. Most of this breed’s time consists of lounging and playing indoors. Because of their flat face and small nostrils, the Pug’s breathing can be affected by extremely hot or cold weather conditions.Discover more about the cheerful Pug.

Pembroke Welsh Corgi

For more active seniors who enjoy outdoor exploration such as walking on nature trails, the lively and adventurous Pembroke Welsh Corgi—often referred to as the “Corgi”—is a great match. With their cute little legs and sparkly eyes, Corgis win over the hearts of children, adults, and elder folks alike.Learn more about the enthusiastic Pembroke Welsh Corgi.

Poodle

For pet parents seeking an easy-to-train dog, the highly intelligent Poodle is one of the best dogs for older people. Poodles must receive ample exercise so they can release excess energy and maintain their well-mannered demeanor. This breed comes in three sizes—Toy, Miniature, and Standard—to meet anyone’s preference.Explore more information on the classy Poodle.

French Bulldog

Also called the “Frenchie,” the joyful French Bulldog is easy to care for (and please!), making them a great fur pal for an elderly individual. It’s hard to resist this endearing, one-of-a-kind breed!Fun Fact:Find out more about the friendly French Bulldog.

Miniature Schnauzer

The handsome Miniature Schnauzer provides ultimate companionship and commitment to their senior pet parent. Like Shih Tzus, Miniature Schnauzers are patient with children and enjoy playtime, making them compatible with grandkids as well!Read on about the spirited Miniature Schnauzer.

Greyhound

The fastest dog breed in the world, the Greyhound may seem like an unlikely fit among the best dogs for older people. However, this athletic dog is low-key, calm, and content with lounging around the home once it gets in its exercise. Plus, Greyhounds are ideal dogs for senior citizens who prefer larger—but manageable—furry friends.Discover more about the sweet Greyhound.

Maltese

The Maltese lives for the spotlight and basks in the attention a senior can offer. In return, the senior is comforted by this cute little lapdog. Talk about a perfect pair!Grooming:Learn more about the spunky Maltese.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

It’s hard to go wrong with the noble Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, or “Cavalier.” This adaptable pup willingly fits right into anyone’s lifestyle—including that of a senior pet parent! Cavaliers can be both a cuddle buddy one day and an adventurous companion the next; they just follow their pet parent’s lead.Explore more about the enchanting Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

Pekingese

The ultimate lapdog, the regal Pekingese is a true charmer. Because this breed isn’t too fond of rough play, it seems to be the best dog for older people who are more likely to live in a calm atmosphere rather than a house full of energetic children.Exercise:Find out more about the confident Pekingese.