Best Allergy Medicine for Cats?

Picture this: You see a sign for free kittenstheir wide-eyed, fluffy faces are just too sweet and adorable to resist. Or, theres a friendly stray that looks hungry hanging around your backyard. Soon youve got a new pet in your home, and it doesnt take long for the sneezing and itchy eyes to start. Youre allergic to your new cat or dog, and youre not sure if theres anything you can do about it.

Sneezing Runny nose Nasal congestion Itchy, watery, or red eyes Cough Wheezing Skin rash/hives Shortness of breath, or chest tightness For mild pet allergies with sneezing, runny nose, and itchy eyes, the first-line treatment is antihistamine pills, says Dr. Qamar, who explains that there are a few different types of antihistamines, but some people do better with one than another.

If someone has prominent allergies and they become sedated often with medication, I usually recommend Allegra or Xyzal , she says. Best allergy medicine for pet allergies Claritin (loratadine)10 mg orally once per dayAntihistamineHeadache, drowsiness, fatigue, dry mouthConsult your doctor if youre pregnant or breastfeeding Get coupon Allegra (fexofenadine)180 mg orally once per day, or 60 mg twice per dayAntihistamineHeadache, drowsiness, dizziness, nauseaConsult your doctor if youre pregnant or breastfeeding Get coupon Zyrtec (cetirizine)5 mg and 10 mg tablets (also available as a syrup and chewable)AntihistamineDrowsiness, dizziness, headacheConsult your doctor if youre pregnant or breastfeeding Get coupon Xyzal (levocetirizine)5 mg tablets,2.5 mg/5 ml oral solution, AntihistamineDrowsiness, fatigue, swollen nasal passagesConsult your doctor if youre pregnant or breastfeeding Get coupon Allergy shots are small doses of the pet allergen, [given] over a period of time, which then lets the immune system see the allergen in small doses, says Ratika Gupta, MD, allergist/immunologist and the other co-author of What?

Dr. Gupta says that while no cat or dog is hypoallergenic, it may be possible to have a peteven if you have pet allergiesif youre absolutely set on the idea. Purchase a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filter Clean floors regularly with a high-efficiency vacuum cleaner Dont allow your pet to sleep in the bedroom with you Give your pet a bath once per week Chances are if youve fallen in love with your pet before you discovered youre allergic, youll likely want to find a way to keep your four-legged friend around.

What allergy medication is best for cat allergies?

How to treat cat allergies. Avoiding the allergen is best, but when that’s not possible, the following treatments may help: antihistamines, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratadine (Claritin) or cetirizine (Zyrtec) corticosteroid nasal sprays such as fluticasone (Flonase) or mometasone (Nasonex)

Is Claritin or Zyrtec better for cat allergies?

Antihistamines for mild pet allergies. For example, a person with mild allergies may do well with Claritin. Another person with more severe allergies may do better with Zyrtec. However, Dr. Qamar says that although Zyrtec may be more effective in some patients, “around 10% of people can become sleepy with it.”

How do you treat cat allergies?

How Are Cat Allergies Treated? Nasal steroid sprays, which affect allergy or asthma symptoms in various ways; steroid sprays are a common treatment for allergies. Budesonide (Rhinocort), fluticasone (Flonase), and triamcinolone (Nasacort Allergy 24HR) are steroid sprays that are available over the counter.

Does Zyrtec work for cat allergies?

Pet allergy relief. When you can’t live without your pet, a medicine for dog and cat allergies can help control your pet allergy symptoms. ZYRTEC ® starts working at hour 1 and stays strong day after day, so you can reduce your cat and dog allergy symptoms.

Your doctor may suspect a pet allergy based on symptoms, an examination of your nose, and your answers to his or her questions. He or she may use a lighted instrument to look at the condition of the lining of your nose. If you have a pet allergy, the lining of the nasal passage may be swollen or appear pale or bluish.

When you minimize your exposure to pet allergens, you generally should expect to have allergic reactions that are less often or less severe. In addition to avoiding pet allergens, you may need medications to control symptoms.

Your doctor may direct you to take one of the following medications to improve nasal allergy symptoms: Antihistamines reduce the production of an immune system chemical that is active in an allergic reaction, and they help relieve itching, sneezing and runny nose. Prescription antihistamines taken as a nasal spray include azelastine (Astelin, Astepro) and olopatadine (Patanase).

Corticosteroids delivered as a nasal spray can reduce inflammation and control symptoms of hay fever. Decongestants can help shrink swollen tissues in your nasal passages and make it easier to breathe through your nose. Your doctor may prescribe montelukast (Singulair), a prescription tablet, if corticosteroid nasal sprays or antihistamines are not good options for you.

Possible side effects of montelukast include upper respiratory infection, headache and fever. One to 2 weekly shots expose you to very small doses of the allergen, in this case, the animal protein that causes an allergic reaction. You can use a neti pot or a specially designed squeeze bottle to flush thickened mucus and irritants from your sinuses with a prepared saltwater (saline) rinse.

If you do find a new home for your pet, your allergy symptoms won’t disappear immediately. Even after a thorough cleaning, your house may have significant levels of pet allergens for several weeks or months. Have someone without pet allergies clean the entire house, including a thorough washing of the ceilings and walls.

Replace upholstered furniture if possible, as cleaning won’t remove all pet allergens from upholstery. Replace sheets, blankets and other bedcovers, because it’s difficult to wash away pet allergens completely. Ask a family member or friend without allergies to bathe your pet on a weekly basis.

If possible, replace wall-to-wall carpeting with tile, wood, linoleum or vinyl flooring that won’t harbor pet allergens as easily. If you’re experiencing runny nose, sneezing, wheezing, shortness of breath or other symptoms that may be related to an allergy, you’ll most likely start by seeing your family doctor. For symptoms that may be related to pet allergy, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

If you have already been diagnosed with asthma and you are having difficulty managing the disease, your doctor may talk to you about the possibility of allergies. Therefore, you may not recognize allergy as a factor possibly complicating your asthma when, in fact, it may be a primary cause.

For many people, the spring and summer seasons not only bring more greenery and sunshine, but also unwanted sinus pressure, sneezing, itchy eyes and respiratory issues.

The most common symptoms related to seasonal allergies in cats are: Itching and irritation of the skin, watery eyes, runny nose, excessive sneezing and labored breathing. Many medicines are antihistamines, which work by blocking histamine, a chemical produced by the immune system in greater amounts when an allergen enters the body.

A generic prescription antihistamine for cats and dogs, Clemastine is commonly used to treat allergies and atopy, in particular to stop pets from itching and scratching their skin. These compounded soft chews available on Chewy are flavored so theyre more appetizing to cats, making them a good alternative for finicky felines who refuse tablet medications. This feline nose relief medicine uses natural ingredients that work as effective decongestants and relieve symptoms such as watery eyes and labored breathing, whether caused by a cold or seasonal allergies.

Formulated to support natural immune defenses, this supplement is composed of organic extracts to relieve symptoms of seasonal allergies in cats and dogs. Enriched with vitamins, its a safe way to alleviate your cats seasonal allergy symptoms without the negative side effects that can come with prescription medications.

Pinpointing the cause of your allergies can be difficult when an animal lives in your home. Thats because homes contain other allergens, such as dust mites, which could cause similar symptoms. Its important to see an allergist to confirm a pet allergy.

Your immune system makes antibodies to fight off substances that might hurt your body, like bacteria and viruses. In a person who has allergies, the immune system mistakes an allergen for something harmful and starts making antibodies to fight it.

This is what causes allergy symptoms such as itching , runny nose , skin rashes , and asthma . Breathing in pet dander or coming into contact with these allergens can cause an allergic reaction. Some people may develop a rash on their face, neck, or upper chest in response to the allergen.

Fatigue is common in untreated allergies, as is an ongoing cough due to postnasal drip. But symptoms such as fevers , chills , nausea , or vomiting should be considered related to an illness rather than allergies. Using a clean needle, your doctor will prick your skins surface (usually on the forearm or back), and deposit a tiny amount of the allergen.

antihistamines , such as diphenhydramine ( Benadryl ), loratadine (Claritin) or cetirizine (Zyrtec) corticosteroid nasal sprays such as fluticasone (Flonase) or mometasone (Nasonex) over-the-counter decongestant sprays cromolyn sodium , which prevents the release of immune system chemicals and may reduce symptoms allergy shots known as immunotherapy (a series of shots that desensitize you to an allergen) leukotriene inhibitors, such as montelukast (Singulair) Salt water (saline) is used to rinse your nasal passages, reducing congestion, postnasal drip , and sneezing . According to National Institutes of Health , butterbur (an herbal supplement), acupuncture, and probiotics may improve the symptoms of seasonal allergies.

Herbal remedies that show potential benefits are those that share a similar action in the body compared to traditional medications. There is ongoing debate among scientists whether infants who are exposed to animals at a very young age are destined to develop allergies, or if the opposite is true. A 2015 study found that exposing infants to cats and dogs at home is associated with a higher risk of developing allergies during the first four years of the childs life.

On the other hand, a 2011 study found that babies who live with cats, especially during the first year of life, develop antibodies to the pet and were less likely to acquire an allergy later. A 2017 study found that cats and dogs may provide a benefit by exposing babies to certain healthy bacteria early in life.

What is a pet allergy?

“Pet allergy occurs when our body’s allergic system becomes activated with any pet dander exposure,” says Niha Qamar, MD, allergist, immunologist, and co-author ofAccording to a 2018 study, as many as 10% to 20% of the worldwide population has allergies to dogs and cats. While pet allergies are common, they’re especially prevalent in people who have a family history of allergies, says Dr. Qamar.

Treatment for pet allergies

According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, symptoms of pet allergies include:These symptoms can be annoying, but they are treatable with pet allergy medicine and allergy shots for severe cases.

Antihistamines for mild pet allergies

For mild pet allergies with sneezing, runny nose, and itchy eyes, the first-line treatment is antihistamine pills,” says Dr. Qamar, who explains that there are a few different types of antihistamines, but some people do better with one than another. For example, a person with mild allergies may do well with Claritin. Another person with more severe allergies may do better with Zyrtec. However, Dr. Qamar says that although Zyrtec may be more effective in some patients, “around 10% of people can become sleepy with it.”“If someone has prominent allergies and they become sedated often with medication, I usually recommend Allegra or Xyzal,” she says.Some antihistamines that are often used to treat pet allergies include the following.

Allergy shots for severe pet allergies

Allergy shots are small doses of the pet allergen, [given] over a period of time, which then lets the immune system see the allergen in small doses,” says Ratika Gupta, MD, allergist/immunologist and the other co-author ofAlso known as immunotherapy, allergy shots are supervised by your immunologist or allergist. “This can essentially be considered a cure for allergies,” Dr. Gupta says. However, they require a time commitment and can be expensive.

How to treat your cat’s seasonal allergies

For many people, the spring and summer seasons not only bring more greenery and sunshine, but also unwanted sinus pressure, sneezing, itchy eyes and respiratory issues.And just as people can suffer from seasonal allergies, so can their cats. Many of our feline friends are affected by allergens, with symptoms ranging from very mild to severe. Luckily, just like people, cats have a range of medications available to soothe their symptoms so they can frolic outdoors or relax by the window free of suffering.

Types of allergies

There are three main variations of allergies that domestic felines can develop: environmental, insect and food allergies.Environmental allergies are the most common and relate to specific seasons, primarily spring. Environmental allergens most commonly include pollen, grass, weeds, dust and mold.

Range of symptoms

Just like humans, cats can experience a wide variety of symptoms related to allergies. For seasonal allergies, most are mild to moderate, but can sometimes become severe. No matter how severe the symptoms, pet owners should always consult with a trusted veterinarian first before treating their pets’ allergies.The most common symptoms related to seasonal allergies in cats are: Itching and irritation of the skin, watery eyes, runny nose, excessive sneezing and labored breathing.If a cat’s skin is particularly irritated due to allergies, they may excessively lick, bite and/or scratch, sometimes leading to hair loss, skin redness and hot spots. You should always seek veterinary attention in such instances as these sites could get infected.

Treating seasonal allergies in cats

Make an appointment with your cat’s veterinarian if you notice allergy symptoms. It’s important to first rule out an acute flare-up or other conditions such as a reaction to a spider bite.After your cat’s allergen triggers have been recognized with the help of a vet, they can help you develop a plan for treatment. Treatment may include prescription medicines, prescription shampoos and topical itch-relief medications.Many medicines are antihistamines, which work by blocking histamine, a chemical produced by the immune system in greater amounts when an allergen enters the body. Histamine response is often the primary cause of symptoms related to allergies.

Prescription medicines

A generic prescription antihistamine for cats and dogs, Clemastine is commonly used to treat allergies and atopy, in particular to stop pets from itching and scratching their skin. Belonging to a group of antihistamines called H1 blockers, this medicine is believed to have a less sedative effect than most other antihistamines. It is administered orally, typically in tablet form. The most common side effect experienced by cats is diarrhea.A powerful anti-inflammatory steroid medication, prednisolone is prescribed to treat a variety of autoimmune diseases as well as allergies. It is administered orally and is commonly found in both tablet and liquid solution forms.Be sure to talk with your vet to discuss side effects, as many short- and long-term effects of oral steroids exist, ranging from vomiting and diarrhea to increased blood pressure and stomach ulcers.Triamcinolone is a corticosteroid often prescribed to relieve allergy symptoms such as itching, dryness and inflammation of the skin. It’s a generic medication in tablet form and given orally, typically with food to prevent an upset stomach. The most frequently experienced side effects include nausea and vomiting as well as increased thirst, drinking and urination.For felines suffering from dermatitis due to allergies, Atopica is often prescribed to treat irritating skin reactions. This medication is an alternative to steroids and can bring long-lasting relief. Side effects can range from vomiting, loss of appetite and general weakness. This liquid solution is given by measuring a dose using a syringe and either putting it in your cat’s food or directly in their mouth.Another antihistamine medication, chlorpheniramine maleate is prescribed to treat allergies, whether seasonal or otherwise. These compounded soft chews available on Chewy are flavored so they’re more appetizing to cats, making them a good alternative for finicky felines who refuse tablet medications. Chlorpheniramine maleate can also be given in the form of a tablet or liquid drops. The most common side effect is drowsiness.

Allergy skin prick test

This test is performed in your doctor’s office so they can observe any reactions.Using a clean needle, your doctor will prick your skin’s surface (usually on the forearm or back), and deposit a tiny amount of the allergen. You’ll likely be tested for several allergens at the same time. You’ll also be skin pricked with a control solution that has no allergens. Your doctor may number each prick to identify the allergen.In about 15 to 20 minutes, the skin prick site may become red or swollen. This reaction confirms an allergy to that substance. A positive cat allergy will usually cause a red, itchy bump to the cat allergen. These unpleasant effects generally go away 30 minutes after the test.

Intradermal skin testing

This test is also performed in your doctor’s office so they can observe any reactions.Possible allergens may be injected under the skin of the forearm or arm. Red, itchy bumps will appear with a positive reaction.An intradermal test is considered more sensitive for detecting an allergy than a skin prick test, meaning it can be better at showing a positive result when an allergy exists. But it can also have more false positives than the skin prick test. That means it creates a skin reaction when there is no allergy.Both skin tests have a role in allergy testing. You doctor will explain which testing method is best for you.

Home remedies

Some people can’t have skin tests done, often because of an existing skin condition or their age. Young children often have a more difficult time with skin testing. In these cases, the doctor will order a blood test. Blood will be drawn either at the doctor’s office or a laboratory and then sent for testing. The blood is then examined for antibodies to common allergens, such as cat dander. The results take longer, but there is no risk of an allergic reaction during a blood test.Avoiding the allergen is best, but when that’s not possible, the following treatments may help:Due toBuy Benadryl, Claritin, or Flonase now.