Bearded Dragon Tank Size?

Bearded dragons are one of the most popular pet species of lizards. They are docile in nature and easy to care for just a few of their admirable qualities. Having the correct environment for your bearded dragon will help ensure that they remain happy and healthy throughout their lifetime.

Bearded dragons are funny little reptiles that are categorized into the desert lizard category they like a warm environment. The eight species of bearded dragons, are distinguished from one another and named for the differences in their spines on their chins and necks .

They can live up to 10 years and can reach up to 24 inches long and weigh up to 18 ounces once full grown. Dont be shocked if your little baby dragon suddenly needs a larger tank within a few months. The natural habitat of bearded dragons are the hot dry desert regions of Australia.

In order to have a life full of being both happy and healthy, bearded dragons need to be housed in an environment thats as close to their natural wild habitat as possible. Room to move Range of temperatures Places to hide Items to climb Areas to dig It is extremely important to your bearded dragons health, that you get them a safe tank, both in structure, size, and setup.

Be aware that some bearded dragons are frightened by humans who reach into the enclosure from above, because in the wild, attacks often come from above them. Other tanks have doors on the front of the enclosure, which gives you easy access to feeding and caring for your dragon. Larger tanks will allow full-grown bearded dragons to completely turn around without bumping into the sides of their enclosure.

The 55 gallon long tank that was graciously gifted to us, with the smaller baby vivarium in the background for size comparison. A 55 gallon long tank will not be wide enough for a mature 18-inch or more bearded dragon to turn around in, explore, and get their needed exercise in comfortably, once they reach their full adult size. Keeping your bearded dragon in a tank that is too small for them may have permanent effect on their health, such as stunted growth.

You should prioritize the length and width of your bearded dragons tanks floor over the height of its walls. However, keep in mind that height is still an important factor when choosing an enclosure for your pet, especially since beardies love to climb. Your bearded dragon might move to a warmer section of their enclosure to bask or because the warmth helps to aid with their digestion.

At the recommended sizes, your bearded dragon can still get access to a varied temperature range for them to choose between. Many people choose to put their baby bearded dragon in a smaller tank until they get a bit larger in size. Some babies could have difficulties catching and eating their food if their enclosure is too large, larger than the 40 gallon tanks.

If they seem to be struggling either finding or hunting their food, you will definitely want to hand feed them or put them into a smaller enclosure until they are older and a bit larger. They may build it from scratch or use existing furniture, like a bookcase or entertainment center to repurpose into a tank. If you choose this option, make totally sure that you do not use cedar or pine wood materials, because the sap can be toxic to bearded dragons.

Bearded dragons are typically solitary animals and are perfectly happy living alone, especially as adults.

Is a 40 gallon tank big enough for a bearded dragon?

A 40-gallon breeder tank will fit a bearded dragon until they reach about 12″ inches (30 cm). At this point, you’ll need a much larger tank for the adult bearded dragon. We don’t recommend keeping two bearded dragons in this size of tank.

What is the minimum tank size for a bearded dragon?

Regular adult bearded dragons should be in a tank at least 55 gallons, but ideally 75 gallons. Dragons upwards of 20 inches should be kept in a tank no smaller than 75 gallons and ideally 120 gallons. Remember, giving your dragon ample room to roam in his tank will not only make him happier, but healthier as well!

How big is a 75 gallon tank for a bearded dragon?

You might get more use from the 75-gallon tank, which will have dimensions of approximately 48″ x 18″ x 21″. If you are in doubt about which tank size to choose, it’s probably best to go for the 75-gallon option. This will give your Bearded Dragon more space to grow.

Is a 50 gallon tank big enough for a bearded dragon?

For an average-sized adult beardy bred in captivity, a bearded dragon tank should be no smaller than 50 gallons and as large as 120 gallons. Adult bearded dragons range in size from 16″ to 20″ inches.

Giving your beardie a habitat (opens in new tab) that is too small can not only lead to stunted growth if theyre a juvenile, but can actually lead them to become depressed, stressed, and in some instances, developing health issues!

To discover what size tank to get your bearded dragon at any age, just keep reading! For exceptionally large dragons, it is really doing them a disservice to be in anything less than 120 gallons, unless you plan on giving them hours of supervised play time outside of their tank every single day!

If you have a baby bearded dragon, under 10 inches or so, then a 20 gallon tank is fine to house them in temporarily. Babies dont need a whole lot of room to exercise and too large of a tank can actually make catching their food very difficult for them! If you house a baby in a tank of this size or larger, keep a close eye on them and observe how adeptly they are able to actually catch and eat their live food, primarily crickets.

Bearded dragons struggling to catch feeders in large tanks should be hand-fed. Remember, giving your dragon ample room to roam in his tank will not only make him happier, but healthier as well! Bearded dragons grow rather quickly , so dont be alarmed if your itty-bitty baby suddenly needs an upgraded tank within a few months!

But still, I highly recommend keeping a close eye and having an additional cage ready in case you need to rescue one. If you need help selecting a vendor, I use and highly recommend Carolina Custom Cages to house your beardie. Remember, 120 gallons is going to provide them with so much more space and entertainment, giving them a happier life.

Giving our beardies a wonderful place to live should be a primary concern for all bearded dragon owners. That starts with picking out the right size vivarium (terrarium or enclosure). Healthy, captive bearded dragons can grow to be up to 24 (61 cm) long. Being cramped in an enclosure that is too small will make for an unhappy, stressed, and possibly unhealthy beardie!

In order to be happy and healthy, they need to live in an environment thats as close to their natural habitat as possible. Room to move Places to hide Things to climb A wide range of temperatures Somewhere to dig

In our opinion, if we are going to keep a wild animal in captivity, we also take on the responsibility of raising it in an optimal manner. We can, however, approximate and do our best to give our beardies enough room to move and climb and dig and enjoy life! While our beardies happiness is a primary concern, we gave her a large space for a different and very important reason her health.

If they need to warm up ( extremely important to aid the digestion of their food ), they have to find somewhere hot to bask. Much like how humans adjust the thermostats in our homes by individual degrees, beardies enjoy the ability to do the same with their environment. You will find that your beardie is constantly moving around its home, always in search of a comfortable temperature for their current needs.

Monitoring temps is importantYou can get their basking spot properly hot (preferably 90-110 | 32-43 depending on their age) while leaving a cool side that gets down to the recommended temperatures (75-85 | 24-29 degrees). Having a nice, tall tank allows your dragon to move a greater distance from the basking lamp if needed. This not only provides for a wide range of temperatures, but it also gives the bearded dragon inside room to climb.

Putting some thought into the dragon you are getting will be important if you arent going to end up with the proper size tank. Giving your beardie plenty of areas to explore by building up is a great little hack that makes a smaller enclosure seem much bigger. Bacardi loves her branch Something we learned very early on is that bearded dragons are highly susceptible to stress.

The most common food for bearded dragons are crickets and this often leads to owners having many questions regarding the crickets they are feeding their beardie. For this reason, we have put together a straightforward and easy-to-follow guide that covers in detail the…

Read on to find the answers to some other important related questions you need to know such as at what age does a Bearded Dragon go from a baby to a juvenile and then to an adult?, will tank size affect the size of your Bearded Dragon? Getting the right tank size for your Bearded Dragon is actually very important but its not just about going as big as possible when they are a baby and thinking that bigger is better.

This means larger tanks can make it difficult for them to catch live food when they are young. You should consider a tank at a size of 20 40 Gallons for a baby Bearded Dragon as this will give them enough room to be healthy and happy and also be small enough to allow them to develop the skill of catching their food. The tank we suggest you house your baby beardie in is the Exp Terra Glass Terrerium

Last update on 2021-12-06 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Juveniles Dragons will obviously need a larger tank as they continue to grow in the first year of their life. In fact, the first 12 months of a Bearded Dragons life is where 90% of the growth takes place so its important to make sure that you have a tank that can allow them the space to grow and be healthy and happy.

By the age that a Bearded Dragon is classed as a juvenile, it should now be comfortable with catching live food in its tank so you no longer have to be cautious about keeping the tank to a moderate size to compensate for this. Carolina Custom Cages Terrarium, Extra-Long, 48Lx18Dx18H, Easy Assembly Our growing family of Carolina Custom Cages Terrariums are very easy to assemble and come in 23 different models. Last update on 2021-12-06 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

When your Bearded Dragon reaches full adulthood then its a good idea to treat them to a large tank as their home. A good size tank for your adult Bearded Dragon is a minimum of 75 Gallons but if you really want to give them a really spacious home to keep them stimulated and also help them grow that little more then a tank of 120 gallons would be great. Carolina Custom Cages Terrarium, Tall Extra-Long Deep 48Lx24Dx24H, Easy Assembly Our growing family of Carolina Custom Cages Terrariums are very easy to assemble and come in 21 different models.

Last update on 2021-12-06 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Ok, so now you know what is a good size tank to start with for a baby, juvenile or adult Bearded Dragon but you also need to know the age and size that a Bearded Dragon is classed as a baby, juvenile or adult. Choosing the right tank size for your Bearded Dragon from day one can save you a lot of messing around in the long run.

If you arent careful you could end up purchasing 4 to 5 tanks or maybeif you dont think this through properly. You can create a natural habitat with a high quality basking area and spacious hides to make them feel safe. All in all, I think going for the 3 larger options right off the bat is a better option than increasing slowly in size every few months or keeping your Dragon in a small 20 Gallon tank when they are an adult that will stunt their growth and happiness..

If you have read the other sections of this post you should have a good idea of what size tank you will need at what age for your Bearded Dragon. If your Bearded Dragon has a tank that is bare and resembles nothing of their natural habitat then there is a good chance they wont feel happy or even safe. If you can do this then having a larger tank rather than a smaller one should certainly help to make your Bearded Dragon feel happy.

They dont need to be in large groups or even live with just one other Bearded Dragon to be happy. This will usually mean the dominant Dragon will bob its head in a fast motion to say Im the boss. This looks cute like they are getting on with each other but actually, the dominant Dragon is stopping the other one from absorbing heat and light and taking it for themselves.

When 2 Dragons are placed in the same tank the less dominant one can end up not getting the required heat and light it needs to be healthy. For these reasons, I wouldnt recommend putting 2 Bearded Dragons in the same tank. In this circumstance, it will be fine to put 2 Bearded Dragons in the same tank, although you will still need to monitor them closely and keep an eye out for aggressive and dominant behaviours.

For example, if you needed a 40 Gallon tank for one Bearded Dragon then simply double the size. Once you have 2 adult Bearded Dragons n the same tank you may want to think about having something custom built to give them space to both be able to bask. They will also be able to have their own hides, overall a larger tank will make for a happier healthier Bearded Dragon.

There are quite a lot of people that like to have a separate tank just for feeding their Bearded Dragon. There can be other advantages to this in theory such as live feeders hiding in the large tank and also your Bearded Dragon can suffer from impaction due to small particles of sand and so on getting stuck in their stomach. Although at first, it seems like a good idea to have a separate tank just for feeding to avoid all of this I wouldnt recommend it.

Bearded Dragons get very comfortable in their own home and moving them just to feed can make them nervy, edgy and uncomfortable. Younger Bearded Dragon can be especially unhappy with getting moved to feed and they will easily get stressed. I really hope this post helped you to decide what tank size you should get for your Bearded Dragon.

Bearded Dragon Basics:

Bearded dragons are funny littleThey fall into the genus Pogona with eight different species falling under this grouping.The eight species of bearded dragons, are distinguished from one another and named for the differences in theirBearded dragons get their name from their armor of spiny scales, which include a “They do this to seem larger to whatever is upsetting them.This may be paired with a erry ‘They can live up toBeardies have a precise eye and good sense of smell.Bearded dragons are often referred to as “beardies”, are one of the more

Bearded Dragon Sizes:

Bearded dragons grow quickly compared to many other pets. Don’t be shocked if your little baby dragon suddenly needs a larger tank within a few months.The speed that a bearded dragon grows will vary depending on their breed, their genetics, and their care management (including diet), but usually you can expect to see your bearded dragon reach its full-grown mature size by around 16 to 18 months of age.Adult bearded dragons can grow up to 24 inches from head to tail. That being said, most pet beardies are between 18-22 inches long as full-grown adults, depending on their breed.

What is a Vivarium?

A vivarium is basically an enclosed environment to house reptiles in. It is the equivalent to an aquarium for fish or a terrarium for plants.Typically a vivarium is made from glass (like an aquarium) or other materials.

Tank Options:

Today, most beardies in captivity are bred and not brought in from the wild.The natural habitat of bearded dragons are the hot dry desert regions of Australia.In order to have a life full of being both happy and healthy, bearded dragons need to be housed in an environment that’s as close to their natural wild habitat as possible.This means bearded dragons have a few non-negotiable needs that we must supply for them:

Bearded Dragon Tank Sizes:

When it comes to having the best tank for bearded dragons, you’re primarily going to want to consider their age.It is best to get the right size tank for each stage of your bearded dragon’s life.The ideal tank size is at least 4 feet by 2 feet by 2 feet for an adult bearded dragon.Young adults and mature adults should have at a very minimum, a 55-120 gallon enclosure.Larger tanks will allow full-grown bearded dragons to completely turn around without bumping into the sides of their enclosure.Always remember – bigger is better when it comes to picking out a tank for an adult bearded dragon!It’s important to remember that some larger gallon tanks still aren’t wide enough, like the 55 gallon long tank that is only 48 x 13 x 21 inches, pictured below:I use it for my bearded dragons when they have not yet reached mature size, just for them when they are still juvenile bearded dragons.A 55 gallon long tank will not be wide enough for a mature 18-inch or more bearded dragon to turn around in, explore, and get their needed exercise in comfortably, once they reach their full adult size.Here is a breakdown of the size of tank that you should be getting for each stage in your bearded dragon’s life:Keeping your bearded dragon in a tank that is too small for them may have permanent effect on their health, such as stunted growth.Your bearded dragon will likely be quite stressed and feel overly confined. And an unhappy beardie can likely pick up some unwanted health problems.

Tank Height Matters Too:

You should prioritize the length and width of your bearded dragon’s tank’s floor over the height of its walls. However, keep in mind thatI’ve had many beardie clients build multiple levels in their enclosures for extra areas for their beardie to explore. Building upwards is a great way to make a smaller enclosure seem much larger for your friend.

Where to Buy a Bearded Dragon Tank?

Vivariums have a wide range of sizes, shapes, and costs. Some are more affordable and others are over-the-top expensive.Pet stores like Petco, Petsmart, and exotic pet shops are the first places most people go to find their bearded dragon a new home.Others shop around for more variety and options through online retailers and even Amazon.Others will choose to make their own DIY vivariums. They may build it from scratch or use existing furniture, like a bookcase or entertainment center to repurpose into a tank.If you choose this option, make totally sure that you do not use cedar or pine wood materials, because the sap can be toxic to bearded dragons.

Do smaller beardies need smaller enclosures?

The natural habitat of a bearded dragon is the desert and arid regions of Australia. Due to wildlife restrictions, almost all beardies in captivity are bred. They are not captured in the wild and then imported.Despite the fact that our beardies were bred in captivity, they are still considered wild animals. In order to be happy and healthy, they need to live in an environment that’s as close to their natural habitat as possible.This means they need several things:In our opinion, if we are going to keep a wild animal in captivity, we also take on the responsibility of raising it in anSure, your bearded dragon probably won’t immediately die if it’s in a crappy enclosure that’s too small. But it may have stunted growth. It won’t be very happy and will instead be constantly stressed. It won’t have the best possible temperament. It will most likely develop health problems.It certainly won’t be living in an environment that even closely resembles where it is genetically designed to live!

Managing temperatures

An enclosure that is too small will often be too hot for your beardie. This leaves it no way to escape the heat when it needs to.This can result in a stressed and possibly unhealthy dragon. Imagine if it was you. Trapped in a glass box. One side is hot, the other is even hotter. You can’t escape.This is also the reason for the minimum size recommendation of 36” x 18” x 18” (91cm x 46cm x 46cm). At that size, you can still get a nicely varied temperature range for your bearded dragon.You can get their basking spot properly hot (preferably 90℉-110℉ | 32℃-43℃ depending on their age) while leaving a cool side that gets down to the recommended temperatures (75℉-85℉ | 24℃-29℃ degrees).Thermal regulation is also aided by tank height. Having a nice, tall tank allows your dragon to move a greater distance from the basking lamp if needed. Since heat rises, it gives your beardie more options than a shorter enclosure.18″ (46 cm) is the minimum height needed with 24” (61 cm) being ideal. Some of the best vivariums we’ve seen are a full 36” (91 cm) or taller. This not only provides for a wide range of temperatures, but it also gives the bearded dragon inside room to climb.Bearded dragons are semi-arboreal (they spend much of their time in trees and bushes if they can). Giving them this option in their enclosure is one more way we can simulate their natural habitat while in captivity.

Matching your dragon to your enclosure

48” x 24” x 24” (122cm x 61cm x 61cm) enclosures can be much harder to find and are more expensive. 36” x 18” x 18” (91cm x 46cm x 46cm) is much more common and is notably cheaper. While the first size is what we really should be working with, it’s just not always going to work out that way.One thing that will help in this case is considering the beardie you get to go inside the enclosure. While a full-grown male can get up to 24” (61 cm)long, that’s not the case with females. They will typically be a little smaller and will usually top out at around 18” (46 cm).A 24” (61 cm) beardie really does need a 48” (122 cm) tank. But the smaller females can comfortably live in a 36” (91 cm) vivarium.Another thing you might look for is a rescue. Many rescues are stunted in growth due to not being properly cared for when young. When you rescue a beardie like this, you are providing a good home for a dragon that may not otherwise find one.Rescuing a stunted beardie also means that the 36” (91 cm) enclosures will work great.That’s how we got Bacardi, our beardie. She is a stunted female rescue and measures under 12” (30 cm) long. She is a sweetheart and we love her, but she will most likely never get close to 24” (61 cm) long. She is happy in her 36” x 18” x 18” (91cm x 46cm x 46cm) enclosure with plenty of room to live and move around!

Take it up a level

One last tip that can help if you end up with a smaller enclosure is to build levels within the space you do have. Giving your beardie plenty of areas to explore by building up is a great little hack that makes a smaller enclosure seem much bigger.Our favorite way to do this is with magnetic ledges by Magnaturals. These cool little accessories stick right to the glass sides of your vivarium and give your beardie places to climb and move around not possible otherwise. Check out all the cool Magnaturals options here on Amazon, they really are awesome!