Bearded Dragon Not Eating?

Ahhh the world is great, right? You bought a bearded dragon and you are the happiest person on earth. Everything is just awesome and you enjoy spending time with your little new reptile friend. Suddenly you realize that your dragon does not eat that much anymore.

Maybe the reason why your bearded dragon is not eating anymore is even totally harmless. Most pet shops do not educate their customers before they buy bearded dragons.

That is why most people think that you can put multiple bearded dragons in one tank without any problems. Bearded dragons are loners which means that they do not get along well with other representatives of their species in most cases. A slow death would mean that the weaker bearded dragon gets harassed the whole day and it will slowly starve.

In the wild once a year, when the temperatures drop bearded dragons slow down their metabolism. It breaks my heart to see all those bearded dragons on Youtube sitting in a tank that has only one food bowl and one hide. Further, you need multiple temperature zones inside a bearded dragon tank.

The bad news is that not every bearded dragon wants to eat greens and many owners give up too quickly on feeding them. If your bearded dragon shows weird behavior besides not eating you should visit a vet rather sooner than later. Look for moving red, yellow, orange, or black dots on your dragon to detect a kind of parasite.

Why is my bearded dragon not eating?

If your bearded dragon consistently won’t eat, one of the first things you should check is enclosure temperature. Dragons that are consistently exposed to temperatures that are too low can have trouble digesting food. They may also develop a weakened immune system. Bearded dragons need a basking spot of 95 to 105°F.

How long can a bearded dragon go without eating?

How Long Can A Bearded Dragon Live Without Eating? The answer to this question greatly depends on the age and health of your pet. For instance, adult beardies with extra weight to lose can go up to 2 months or longer without food, although this is far from optimal!

Is it normal for a bearded dragon to not eat for a day?

Brumation is one of the main reasons why a healthy bearded dragon might stop eating. … Brumation is completely normal – some bearded dragons might not brumate at all, some will wake up during brumation. But some bearded dragons will be mostly inactive during brumation. It can take from few weeks to up to 2-3 months!

They are usually enthusiastic eaters and have a strong desire for food. A bearded dragon not eating can be cause for concern and a symptom of a wider health issue.

A Bearded Dragon refusing to eat can be a sign of a health problem, the result of a poor diet, a natural behavior or bad husbandry. Brumation Shedding UVB Lighting Cold Tank Temperature Impaction Parasites Stress Wrong Diet Vitamin Deficiency Injury

If an adult stops eating for more than a week, to make sure it is in good health, you should take it to a vet regardless of the reason. In the winter bearded dragons go through a period of dormancy to help save energy, this is called brumation . Brumation helps wild species save energy and increases their chances of survival and successful breeding.

Many pet bearded dragons do not brumate because the temperature and lighting in their enclosures remain the same year round. Make sure you offer food once a week to a brumating dragon and keep a constant supply of water in the enclosure. As the lighting outside begins to become brighter in the spring, he should become active again and you can return to normal tank conditions and feeding schedules.

Your bearded dragon will eat very little during this process and this is not cause for concern unless he starts losing significant weight. As bearded dragons grow they shed their outer layer of skin in a process called ecdysis. This lighting helps bearded dragons synthesize vitamin D and build strong bones.

Metabolic bone disease is a serious health problem that can deform their limbs, spines and skulls. The absence of UVB lighting normally does not result in them refusing to eat or a loss of appetite. However, the symptoms and stress of metabolic bone disease can make it hard for your bearded dragon to eat .

If your bearded dragon stops eating and does not have a UVB light, take him to a vet for blood tests. A combination of adding a 10.0 UVB bulb to their enclosure and calcium injections will be part of their treatment. Bearded dragons are native to the scrublands of Australia and are considered a type of desert lizard .

If your bearded dragon consistently wont eat, one of the first things you should check is enclosure temperature. Temperatures should be checked with a thermometer several times a day to make sure they remain within the right range. Cold temperatures are a common reason for a bearded dragon to not eat, but that can be fixed easily.

Unlike brumation, where his appetite slowly decreases, impaction occurs as a sudden lack of eating. Loose substrate is easily ingested by bearded dragons and is the main reason behind impaction. Using a substrate like reptile carpet , newspaper, or tiles greatly reduces the risk of impaction, especially in hatchlings and juveniles.

But, too high of a load can lead to problems that include a lack of appetite and weight loss . It is important to take any adopted dragon to a vet for a thorough exam to rule out any future problems with parasites. Refusing food, lower activity levels, increased aggression, black beards, pacing and glass surfing are all signs of stress.

Foods like meat, fish, dairy, dead insects, onions, and peppers should not be fed. Try offering a variety of fruits, veggies, and insects to find out which foods your bearded dragon likes. Food variety is also a great way to make sure they get a healthy balance of vitamins, minerals and nutrients.

Sharp and abrasive edges on tank dcor can cause injuries, especially on their soft stomachs and toes. Start by checking the UVB bulb is less than six months old and ambient and surface temperatures are within the correct range.

Bearded dragons (or beardies), known as a species as Pogona vitticeps, are increasingly one of the most popular lizards kept in captivity as pets at home. They are seen as good reptile pets because they are medium in size, generally have a calm temperament, and are typically easy to look after.

Image Credit: Arledas, PixabayIt is vital to do your research before you commit to looking after a lizard (or any pet) using trusted, accurate sources. Lizards need a lot of highly specific care and failure in any aspect of it can make your bearded dragon very poorly.

Bearded dragons are medium-sized, solitary lizards that can grow up to about 18 inches (45 cm) long over a lifespan of 10 to 15 years. Their usual diet is fairly broad, including insects (live food) and plant material (greens and vegetables). Insects should be no larger than the size of your lizards mouth, and safe greens include watercress, rocket, cress, and butternut squash.

Image Credit: Kevin Khoo, ShutterstockBeardies need to live in a special enclosure or vivarium that replicates their natural Australian habitat. Both components are required for the continued health of the dragon and the light must be placed close enough to your beardie, so ensure you check the manufacturers instructions on height. In general, appetite should be consistent, but bearded dragons do naturally go through a period of brumation in the cooler months, as room temperature and daylight hours decrease, where they will eat very little or nothing at all.

Some keepers advocate feeding nothing at all so that the gut is truly empty while brumation proceeds, ensuring that food is not left sitting in the stomach for a long period. Image Credit: Hans Braxmeier, PixabayAn adult beardie with good energy reserves and fat stores can comfortably pass 48 weeks without eating. In normal circumstances, if your bearded dragon has not eaten properly for more than a few days, or is losing significant amounts of weight, it is best to consult a veterinarian sooner rather than later.

Image Credit: Rangga A Firmansyah, ShutterstockThe most common reason for health problems is found in the environment provided. The diet must be appropriate and balancedfor example, your beardie will not try to eat insects that are too large and may be made poorly by excesses of the wrong greens (for example, too much spinach can affect calcium absorption). Incorrect humidity and UV sources can also cause other health problems, which may contribute to a loss of appetite (especially through pain).

Problems usually affect the skeleton, through processes involving calcium and vitamin D. These can be painful and so lead to a reduction in energy and appetite. All veterinarians are highly qualified professionals, but not many work with lizards on a regular basis and so (not unreasonably) are not as experienced with them as they are with other species. Image Credit: hedgehog94, ShutterstockConstipation is a common problem in lizards and may or may not develop alongside anorexia (loss of appetite) and lethargy.

Constipation can also be caused by a blockage, such as an impaction (sand, for example, solidifying inside the gut, or even an excess of mealworm casings) or a physical object (stone). If your bearded dragon hasnt been to the toilet in more than a day or two, it is reasonable to check the vent (the bottom, on the underside of the animal at the base of the tail) for any visible problems, and then put them in a warm water bath for 30 minutes. It is vital to do plenty of research and learn from experienced, reliable, and accurate sources before taking on a pet like a beardie.

Anorexia can be caused by lots of different things and while it is normal for bearded dragons to eat less during their brumation, they should usually have a consistent appetite.

Bringing a baby bearded dragon home is an exciting time for all involved, however, if your baby bearded dragon isnt eating then this can quite quickly become a worrying time.

New home Change in surroundings Incorrect basking temperature Incorrect lighting setup Household pets Change in diet Due to injury Due to illness or infection Shedding Brumation Suffering from impaction There are lots to get used to and over the coming weeks and months your baby bearded dragon will go through many changes.

There are 11 common reasons why your baby bearded dragon might not want to eat and for, the most part, once you understand the reason why your bearded dragon isnt wanting to eat you can rectify this pretty quickly. As you read through the 11 reasons we have shared, It can be easy to go with the first answer that fits but this can often mislead you down the wrong path. One of the most common reasons why baby bearded dragons dont want to eat is due to moving to a new home.

This initial move can cause a lot of stress for a baby bearded dragon and eating less or even refusing food altogether is common. The main thing is to give your baby beardie some time and space to settle into your home, dont over handle them and keep any large pets away from their tank for the first few days and even the first couple of weeks. A change in your baby bearded dragons surroundings is something that can cause uncertainty and stress.

No matter If your dragon is new to your home or has been with you for a while, if you are moving them around a little until you find the right spot in the room for their tank or adding new plants and decor then this will have an effect on their stress levels. Your baby dragon could easily see other household pets such as cats and dogs are predators and this will leave them both stressed and constantly intimidated. Having the incorrect temperatures in the tank can also a major reason why your bearded dragon doesnt want to eat.

Bearded dragons need to be provided with the optimal basking temperatures to have the ability to digest their food and even feel hungry in the first place. If you are unsure what temperatures your bearded dragon will need to be healthy, digest their food and have a good appetite then check out our guide below Baby bearded dragons dont usually go into brumation until they are older but this has been known to happen an is certainly a possibility.

When a bearded dragon is getting ready to go into brumation (the reptile equivalent of hibernation) you will generally see many changes to their behaviour including being lethargic and eating less food. It can be quite dangerous for very young bearded dragons to go into brumation as they usually havent gained enough weight to see them through the 4-12 week period that they will be fasting and sleeping. This, in turn, can cause your baby bearded dragon to become irritated, hide more and even not want to eat.

These kinds of behaviours will usually only last for a short period of time and there are certain things you can do to help them through the shedding process. Impaction is basically constipation and it can be quite common in bearded dragons depending on their diet and other factors in their tank. Loose particle-based substrates arent really advised for beardies of any age but even less so for baby bearded dragons.

As they are inexperienced hunters they can often grab a mouth full of substrate when trying to eat insects such as crickets. There are many substrates that are safe for bearded dragons but the one we highly recommend is sand mat as its Even though bearded dragons arent the most high-flying and adventurous of animals, they can still get themselves into situations that can cause injury.

If your baby beardie is injured then they will likely show signs of this when they are walking or by hiding more often than usual. They can also have a reduced appetite or even stop eating altogether through the stress and pain that the injury causes. If your baby bearded dragon is ill or has an infection then this can easily cause them to stop eating.

Illness and infection can come in many forms and will usually result in your bearded dragon being lethargic and of course a lack of appetite. The most common reasons for a bearded dragon to become ill are due to parasites or problems such as mouth rot. Bearded dragons have their own personalities and while one beardie will love a certain food, another simply wont.

If you are trying to introduce new foods to your baby beardie then theres a possibility that they wont like them and therefore will point blank refuse to eat them. The obvious way to know if this is the cause of them not eating is to give your dragon insects and foods you know they enjoy. Adult bearded dragons that have plenty of fat stores can go anywhere from 1-2 months without food if necessary.

When it comes to baby and juvenile bearded dragons, the length of time they can go without food is far less. Its difficult to put an exact time scale on exactly how long a baby bearded dragon can go without food as their specific age, weight, size, diet and fat stores will al have an effect. The bottom line is that if your baby bearded dragon isnt eating after 2-3 days then you should seek advice from your vet.

Brumation

A Bearded Dragon refusing to eat can be a sign of a health problem, the result of a poor diet, a natural behavior or bad husbandry. The following list contains theBrumation and shedding are normal behaviors that can be concerning for new owners. They happen naturally for the duration of a dragon’s life.Lighting, temperature, and diet can all be corrected at home, but ideally they should be set up properly before bringing your lizard home. The remaining issues may require a vet.If an adult stops eating for more than a week, to make sure it is in good health, you should take it to a vet regardless of the reason. Juveniles should go to the vet after three days of not eating.For each of the reasons above we will now explain signs to look out for, why this is happening and most importantly, how to get them to start eating healthily again.

Shedding

As bearded dragons grow they shed their outer layer of skin in a process called ecdysis. During this process their skin becomes white and papery, and is rubbed off in patches.Depending on the age of the bearded dragon, the frequency and length of shedding varies widely.A large adult may take two weeks to fully shed. A juvenile may finish shedding in a day or two. Younger dragons can shed every month and sometimes every two weeks as they go through their most rapid growth. Older adults may shed only twice a year.If you notice your bearded dragon is not eating as much as normal, check to see if he is about to shed. If you notice white papery skin, this is the likely cause.Before andSome individuals, especially hatchlings and juveniles, do not lose their appetite and will continue to eat.Shedding happens throughout their entire life. The pattern of a reduced appetite with shedding becomes routine for long-time owners. For first time keepers it can cause concern and take some getting used to.Brief fasting during shedding should not impact their weight, though they may become slightly lethargic and irritable. Give them time and do not try and handle them, unless you are helping with stuck shed.

UVB Lighting

Wild bearded dragons are most active during the day and get plenty of sunlight. Pet species get “sunlight” from special UVB lighting in their enclosure. This lighting helps bearded dragons synthesize vitamin D and build strong bones.A 10.0 UVB bulb is needed for bearded dragons and should be replaced every six months as the UVB output decreases. Beardies can develop metabolic bone disease without this.Metabolic bone disease is a serious health problem that can deform their limbs, spines and skulls. The absence of UVB lighting normally does not result in them refusing to eat or a loss of appetite. However, the symptoms and stress of metabolic bone disease canIf your bearded dragon stops eating and does not have a UVB light, take him to a vet for blood tests. Blood tests can show if your lizard’s blood calcium is too low. This may indicate he is in the early stages of metabolic bone disease.Metabolic bone disease can be treated, and even reversed, if caught early. A combination of adding a 10.0 UVB bulb to their enclosure and calcium injections will be part of their treatment.

Cold Tank Temperature

Bearded dragons are native to the scrublands of Australia and are considered a type of desert lizard. If your bearded dragon consistently won’t eat, one of the first things you should check is enclosure temperature.Dragons that are consistently exposed to temperatures that are too lowBearded dragons need a basking spot of 95 to 105°F. Night-time temperatures should be no lower than 75°F, but this can be decreased slightly during brumation. Temperatures should be checked with a thermometer several times a day to make sure they remain within the right range.These lizards are cold-blooded and rely on tank temperature for energy. They will not eat until they are fully warmed up. They also need the tank to remain warm for three hours after eating to help with digestion.Because of these reasons, many beardies are not ready to eat first thing in the morning. Bearded dragons should always be fed in the afternoon.Cold temperatures are a common reason for a bearded dragon to not eat, but that can be fixed easily. Consistently low temperatures can lead to more serious illnesses. If your dragon is wheezing or has discharge from its nose and mouth, it may have a respiratory infection and should be taken to a vet.

Impaction

Impaction happens when food, or any item, gets stuck in your beardie’s intestinal tract and causes a blockage. This blockage is highly uncomfortable andThe most notable symptoms of impaction are a lack of appetite and a change in feces. Their poop may completely stop or be very small and grainy.Unlike brumation, where his appetite slowly decreases, impaction occurs as a sudden lack of eating.Impaction is quite common in reptiles that live in enclosures with the wrong substrate (Sand impaction is easy to see with x-rays and can be felt by gently touching their stomach.If you think your bearded dragon is impacted, then stop feeding and take him to a vet as soon as possible. Sometimes impaction can clear up on its own, but it normally requires a trip to the vet.

Stress

Internal parasites are normally a bigger problem for wild-caught pets. Captive-bred species can get parasites from their prey, or through contact with other reptiles, but this is not as common.Every bearded dragon is able to carry a certain parasite load without it impacting their health. But, too high of a load can lead to problems that include a lack of appetite and weight loss.Protozoans, nematodes, and trematodes are some of the most widespread parasites. Wild insects are often carriers of these parasites so you should never feed wild insects.Also if you are handling more than one reptile, then wash your hands between cages to prevent the spread of parasites.Infected dragons areParasites can be tested for by a vet and are usually easy to treat with antiparasitic medication.

Wrong Diet

A common reason for a bearded dragon not to eat isBeardies are omnivorous insectivores. This means they eat mostly plants, but get most of their protein from insects. Foods like meat, fish, dairy, dead insects, onions, and peppers should not be fed.Adults need a diet of 75% plants and 25% insects. Feeding too many insects can result in constipation and impaction.Juveniles need more insects than veggies, but they should not be fed insects high in chitin (Finally, not all bearded dragons like the same food.Some love crickets and others may only want dubia roaches.Try offering a variety of fruits, veggies, and insects to find out which foods your bearded dragon likes.Food variety is also a great way to make sure they get a healthy balance of vitamins, minerals and nutrients.

Vitamin Deficiency

There are several vitamins that bearded dragons need to stay healthy. Vitamin E, A, and B1 are all very important to their diet.A Vitamin E deficiencyVitamin D is the vitamin that many bearded dragons lack. Calcium supplements are often mixed with vitamin D3, so dusting food with a calcium supplement will prevent any deficiency.Feeding a balanced diet that has lots of leafy vegetables will prevent most, if not all, vitamin deficiencies.Bearded dragons that are recovering from a hunger strike are more likely to have a deficiency.If you think your lizard might have a vitamin deficiency then take him to a vet to check his blood vitamin levels. Trying to self-dose your beardie with vitamins can result in an overdose.

Bearded dragons – basic facts and background

It is vital to do your research before you commit to looking after a lizard (or any pet) using trusted, accurate sources. Lizards need a lot of highly specific care and failure in any aspect of it can make your bearded dragon very poorly.Bearded dragons are medium-sized, solitary lizards that can grow up to about 18 inches (45 cm) long over a lifespan of 10 to 15 years. They originate from the dry bushlands of Australia and are diurnal, meaning they are most active during the day.All lizards rely on the environment and especially the sun for their body temperature—they cannot generate their own body heat and depend entirely on external warmth.Their usual diet is fairly broad, including insects (live food) and plant material (greens and vegetables). Insects should be no larger than the size of your lizard’s mouth, and safe greens include watercress, rocket, cress, and butternut squash. It is best to avoid spinach, kale, and cabbage, as these can negatively affect internal metabolism if eaten in any quantity.Beardies need to live in a special enclosure or vivarium that replicates their natural Australian habitat. This means it needs to be large enough (at least 48 inches long by 24 inches high by 24 inches deep for a single dragon) and provide warmth, humidity, and UV light. Usually, vivariums are designed to have a cool end (71.6–78.8°F) rising to a warm end and basking zone (100.4–107.6°C) so that your beardie can move between them as required.Humidity levels should be controlled between 30% and 40%. A special UV light should be used to provide both UVA light and UVB light. Both components are required for the continued health of the dragon and the light must be placed close enough to your beardie, so ensure you check the manufacturer’s instructions on height. Generally, these lights are kept on a timer, so they are on for half of the day (just like day and night). It is again useful to have a gradient of light so there is a bright spot and a place of shade too, so the lizard can choose.Vivariums should be kept clean with excretions removed regularly, fresh water provided and changed daily, and unused food items removed daily.Vivariums usually include things for your bearded dragon to interact with (enrichment) – including stones, branches, and a hide. A sand or sand/soil mixture can be used as the floor (substrate) to allow opportunities for digging.

Bearded Dragons feed once a day

Bearded dragons are usually fed once a day as adults. It is important to keep an accurate record of how much is fed, as overfeeding and obesity can be a problem! It is also useful to weigh your bearded dragon once a week using basic scales—their weight should not change by more than 5% in normal circumstances, so a change greater than this is significant.

Bearded Dragons enjoy just lounging around!

A healthy bearded dragon will be active during the day, but they do spend a lot of time lounging around! They will interact with their environment, eat, and drink (though they don’t drink a lot). They love to sit on rocks and enjoy the warmth and UV.

Beardies shed their skin

Beardies, like other lizards, shed their skin in large pieces at intervals. It is important not to pull on bits of skin but allow them to shed naturally. If patches seem stuck on, it is fine to try a warm water bath for a few minutes to soften them. Shedding does depend on humidity and the hydration of the beardie, so if these are wrong, shedding can cause problems including loss of toes.

Beardies undergo brumation (semi-dormancy / lethargy)

In general, appetite should be consistent, but bearded dragons do naturally go through a period of “brumation” in the cooler months, as room temperature and daylight hours decrease, where they will eat very little or nothing at all. Brumation is a normal, natural process similar to hibernation and may last between a few weeks and a few months.During this period, they need less warmth and light, as in the wild they would be hiding away in a burrow. Although they are not eating, their weight should not change during this period, so it is well worth keeping an eye on weekly weigh-ins. It is fine to continue these during brumation.

Normal bearded dragons have long droppings

Normal droppings should be long and quite firm, with a dark part (feces) and a white part (lizard urine). Well-hydrated lizards also produce a little liquid too. If the droppings are not like this, or if there have not been any droppings for more than a day or two, then there may be a problem.

Stress

The most common reason for health problems is found in the environment provided. It is essential to get the vivarium environment exactly and consistently right. Here are some key tips:

Parasites

Lizards have their own dedicated group of gut parasites and infections. These are relatively common and will usually cause anorexia, weight loss, and softer feces than normal. Abnormal droppings should be investigated under a microscope by a veterinarian.The most common parasites are pinworms and a tiny germ called

Other diseases

Lizards are prone to metabolic diseases, where normal processes involved in metabolism go awry. Usually these are associated with a poor diet or poor UV light sources, and so everything comes back to husbandry again. Problems usually affect the skeleton, through processes involving calcium and vitamin D. These can be painful and so lead to a reduction in energy and appetite.Lizards do suffer from cancers and tumors too, unfortunately, and these can cause various problems internally as well as physical obstruction of the bowel.