Baby Yellow Bellied Slider?

One of the most popular pet turtles, yellowbellied sliders, are long-lived aquatic turtlessome live up to 40 years in captivity. These turtles spend most of their time in the water, but unlike amphibians, they need to be able to get out of the water to dry off and rest. As far as turtles go, this species is moderately easy to care for. In general, aquatic turtles require a lot of tank maintenance. Closely related to red-eared sliders, these turtles will also need a giant tank as adults. These popular pets are distinguished by their shellsbrown or black with yellow stripes. Their underbelly or lower shell is yellow with black spots, hence its name. This turtle’s native range is the southeastern U.S. from Florida to Virginia.

They will never be a cuddly pet like a dog or cat, but yellowbellied sliders tend to have unique personalities that endear them to their owners. Aquariums are good for young sliders, but as these turtles mature, their size makes housing them a bit more challenging.

Provide a basking dock and clean water for your turtle housed indoors. If your yellowbellied slider lives outdoors, it will not need supplemental UV lighting; the sun’s rays will be sufficient. To control their temperature, turtles seek out basking spots to soak up the sun’s warm rays.

If you have an indoor tank, you will need to replicate a sunny basking spot that can reach 80 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Commercial turtle pellets are a proper base diet when supplemented with a variety of other items. Metabolic bone disease and vitamin deficiencies are also common issues that affect aquatic turtles in captivity due to inappropriate diets and lighting. Make sure your UVB and heat lights are changed regularly to help keep your turtle healthy.

If you notice any signs of illness, consult with an exotics veterinarian who specializes in reptile care. The Spruce / Melissa Ling
Before you bring home your yellowbellied slider, there are a few things to look out for to ensure it’s healthy.

What do baby yellow-bellied sliders eat?

Baby turtles do best when fed small crickets, mealworms and cockroaches four times a week. You can also feed pieces of Romaine lettuce, dandelion greens and other vegetables, so that 1/3 of their diet is plant-based.

How do you take care of a baby yellow belly slider?

Yellow-bellied sliders require a turtle tank as their enclosure. ….During the day the peninsular turtle will periodically move on to the basking area. ….Yellow-bellied sliders spend most of their time in the water so keeping it warm and clean is a priority.

Can you keep a yellow-bellied slider as a pet?

These curious, amiable reptiles are entertaining pets if cared for properly. They will never be a cuddly pet like a dog or cat, but yellow-bellied sliders tend to have unique personalities that endear them to their owners.

How big are baby yellow-bellied sliders?

Yellow-bellied sliders commonly grow to a shell length of 8 to 10 inches, but some reach 11 inches. Hatchlings are initially bright in color, but they soon dull. The 1 1/4-inch long hatchlings are almost round when viewed from above. The carapace, or upper shell, of a hatchling is green.

Baby Yellow Belly Slider Turtle for sale at the best prices on the Internet. Born this year, they are all very active and healthy. Just now starting to feed on our baby turtle pellet food. Myturtlestore.com recommends feeding your new baby yellow belly slider turtle two times a day in a separate bowl that is designated a feeding bowl. Put 2 or 3 of the sample turtle food into the water with your turtle. Give it about 20 minutes to eat then return the turtle to its home. Remember to always wash your hands and feeding bowl with soapy water. All turtles with a shell of less than 4inches are sold for scientific, educational and export purposes only. Here are a few things to know about your new turtle.

Plus as an added bonus we offer a free 10-day health guarantee on every baby yellow belly slider turtle for sale here at myturtlestore.com

Yellowbellied sliders are one of the most common species of turtle in the eastern United States. If you have ever seen turtles basking on a log near the east coast, there is a good chance you have already seen one!

If you are interested in owning on a slider then keep reading for tips on their care, diet, tank setup and more In the wild, yellowbellied sliders are found in the southeastern United States near bodies of water like estuaries, lakes, marshes, and swamps.

The name slider comes from their tendency to slide off logs and muddy banks into the water at the first sign of danger. These turtles are a vibrant yellow and black with striped legs, neck, and head. The bottom part of their shell ( i.e. plastron ) is bright yellow with dark smudges or spots.

Hatchlings are born about the size of a quarter and grow to be a foot in length after eight years. But, they continue to grow slowly for their entire lives and can end up weighing over seven pounds. Pet species should eat mostly leafy green vegetables, supplemented with protein from insects.

This means they spend most of their time swimming, but sometimes they come on to land to bask and rest in the sun. To accommodate their lifestyle, their tank setup will need to be mostly water that is deep enough for them to fully submerge. Unfortunately, many first time owners keep these pets in poor conditions which can cause outbreaks of salmonella.

Young turtles are primarily carnivores that feed on aquatic insects, worms, and small fish. Baby turtles do best when fed small crickets, mealworms and cockroaches four times a week. Gradually introduce more fruits and vegetables into your turtles diet, along with food pellets formulated for adults.

Fully grown turtles should be fed mostly pellets and leafy greens, along with some aquatic plants like duckweed. Unlike juveniles, adults only need one meal every other day, with only 50% of their diet consisting of protein. To ensure proper nutrition, dust your turtles food with a multivitamin once each week.

Some owners use a standard glass fish tank to house their slider, while others use plastic pond liners to create a more natural setup. The tank water should be kept at 72 to 80F with an underwater heater, and must be properly cleaned with a powerful aquarium filter. Turtles can accidentally ingest gravel or pebbles, which can cause gastrointestinal impaction.

On land, live plants, flowerpots, plastic boxes, leaf litter and wooden logs are great dcor options. Live plants like waterweed, anubias, and mosses can be used in the water portion of your tank, but keep in mind that they may be munched on. In the wild, their long lifespan is partly because of their tough shell , which prevents attacks from other animals.

As their shell is their main line of defense, slider turtles put less energy into their immune systems. Infected turtles have a runny discharge from the nose, bubbles around the mouth and audible breathing. If left untreated shell rot can cause open sores and secondary infections.

The best way to prevent shell rot is to keep your turtles tank clean and monitor it for any injuries. The top of their shell is a dark brownish green with orange and black wavy lines. This makes them more aerodynamic for swimming and provides a larger surface area to soak up the sun when basking.

They also have long sharp claws that help them build nests as well as climb on logs, rocks and muddy banks. However, they are a sexually dimorphic species, meaning there is a significant difference in size between males and females. Though more suited to swimming, these turtles are surprisingly quick on land and can sprint short distances.

Sliders are great swimmers and often sleep underwater , but they still need access to land to survive. Yellowbellied sliders like to rest on logs and banks throughout the day to bask and raise their body temperature. Your turtle will move in and out of the water to keep its internal temperature at a constant level.

In the wild sliders hibernate during the cold winter months, but in captivity, where temperatures are constant, they are active year-round. Always wash your hands before and after handling turtles, and avoid letting small children hold them. Pet turtles are a significant cause of salmonella cases in the United States, which can be deadly to children and people with compromised immune systems.

Buying an adult is not only more responsible, but also gives you a greater chance of getting a healthy pet. If you are interested in purchasing a yellowbellied slider, expect to take home a lively, engaging pet that will remain active for over 20 years.

Yellowbellied sliders are a popular pet turtle that many owners enjoy. Their high activity level and unique habitat requirements make them stand out in pretty much any home.

Native to the Southern United States, these turtles are found in a wide range of environments. But with good care, you should expect them to be around for at least a couple of decades (which is quite the long term commitment).

Expert Tip: Its worth pointing out that these turtles are extremely dependant on an optimal habitat to reach their full lifespan potential. Without a well-maintained environment and a healthy diet, these turtles can get sick and die far earlier than they should. The feet have long claws, which can help to grip the soil as they make their way on land.

However, each toe is webbed to make the turtle a graceful swimmer in the water! While they might adapt well to life in captivity, there are a wide range of different conditions youll need to stay on top of. Yellowbellied sliders require an enclosure that can accommodate the land and water portion of their environment.

These turtles do fine in only a foot of water, but larger specimens may prefer depths of 16 to 18 inches. While yellowbellied sliders will spend most of their time in the water, they use the land to regulate their temperature and bask in the sun. These turtles rely on amply lighting to regulate their body temperature and stay healthy.

It provides UVA and UVB rays to promote proper nutrient metabolism (more on that later). Unlike other reptiles, you wont have to worry about humidity levels in your yellowbellied sliders habitat. The air in the enclosure will have plenty of humidity already due to the massive swimming area.

If temperatures fall below that range, install some submersible heaters to keep conditions stable. Replace the filter medium as necessary and use a brush to keep algae levels under control. To keep ammonia and nitrate levels undetectable, perform partial water changes every few weeks.

A balanced plant-based diet thats rich in vitamins and nutrients will go a long way in keeping them healthy. High-quality commercial turtle pellets fall into this category and can be relied on heavily. These turtles enjoy Romaine lettuce, fresh parsley, dandelion greens, and even apples.

Expert Tip: Juvenile turtles should eat two small meals a day. Fungal spores can develop on your turtles back, causing shell rot. This condition affects turtles that dont have exposure to UV light.

Whenever it is required (like when youre cleaning the enclosure), immediately move them to a separate container so they dont get stressed. Having a good understanding of what these turtles need to survive will help you make smart care decisions throughout their lives. We know these reptiles are a bit different than many of the others weve covered on this site, so feel free to send over questions!

Yellow-Bellied Slider Behavior and Temperament

The slider is a diurnal turtle, meaning it is most active during the day. They tend to eat first thing in the morning, and in the wild will spend most of the rest of the day basking in the sun. Captive yellowbellied sliders also are most active during the day.Like most turtles, yellowbellied sliders do not like handling; this can cause undue stress for them. Over time, you might be able to get them accustomed to handling, but when they feel threatened, they will bite.These curious, amiable reptiles are entertaining pets if cared for properly. They will never be a cuddly pet like a dog or cat, but yellowbellied sliders tend to have unique personalities that endear them to their owners.

Housing the Yellow-Bellied Slider

Aquariums are good for young sliders, but as these turtles mature, their size makes housing them a bit more challenging. The ideal tank size for an adult slider is 75 to 100 gallons. Provide a basking dock and clean water for your turtle housed indoors.These turtles eat and leave fecal matter in their aquatic home. You will need to install a tank filter rated for two to three times the amount of water you have in your tank. You can use canister filters or submersible biological filters. If you don’t have a filter, you will need to do weekly partial water changes and water quality testing, something that is both time-consuming and messy. If the water remains dirty, your turtle can develop various health issues.Treat water with a water conditioner before using it. The water conditioner will remove chlorine and other harsh water additives that can disturb your biological filter and your pet’s quality of life.If you have an outdoor pond and a securely fenced yard to keep your turtle in and predators out, you might consider putting it outdoors for at least part of the year.Enterprising owners also make roomy habitats for sliders by using pre-formed plastic pond liners to make indoor ponds. All turtles kept indoors will need special lighting.

Light

Turtles need adequate UVA and UVB rays. They typically get these UV rays from unfiltered sunlight or a special lamp. Aquatic turtles will need these UV lights year-round for about 12 hours per day. Replace UV light bulbs every six months. If your yellowbellied slider lives outdoors, it will not need supplemental UV lighting; the sun’s rays will be sufficient.

Heat

As cold-blooded creatures, turtles need to self-regulate their body temperature. To control their temperature, turtles seek out basking spots to soak up the sun’s warm rays. If you have an indoor tank, you will need to replicate a sunny basking spot that can reach 80 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Either a 60-watt or 100-watt basking bulb should be sufficient. As turtles also need the UV rays from the sun for proper development, you can get a combination mercury vapor bulb, which provides both heat and UV.Their water also needs to be at a constant temperature of 75 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. A water heater will be required to keep the water warm. It should be maintained day and night.

Food and Water

Yellowbellied sliders are omnivorous creatures. Turtles of all ages should get a wide variety of both animal and plant-based items. Juveniles and hatchlings should eat twice a day. Once a turtle reaches adulthood (age 2 to 5), feed once a day.Commercial turtle pellets are a proper base diet when supplemented with a variety of other items. Offer only what your turtle can consume in about 15 minutes and remove uneaten food.Dark, leafy greens like romaine, dandelion greens, and fresh parsley should be a regular part of your yellowbellied slider‘s diet. Offer chopped apple pieces and freeze-dried shrimp occasionally.Most aquatic turtles eat the occasional insect or fish, but avoid giving them fatty fish, and never give them high-protein meats. An aquatic turtle’s diet should be mainly plant-based.Feeding your turtle outside of its home is a bit more work at feeding time, but it will make keeping the tank clean a lot easier in the long run.

Common Health Problems

Sliders should be able to dive into their water. A turtle that is always floating can be a sign of a problem, such as pneumonia. Turtles with eyes that are closed or puffy may indicate a respiratory infection or a similar issue. Wheezing and drooling also are signs of respiratory ailments.Shells that are soft, not smooth, or covered in algae might have shell rot, which is a painful condition caused by fungus.Metabolic bone disease and vitamin deficiencies are also common issues that affect aquatic turtles in captivity due to inappropriate diets and lighting. Make sure your UVB and heat lights are changed regularly to help keep your turtle healthy. Metabolic bone disease is particularly painful for turtles and can be life-threatening if not treated properly.If you notice any signs of illness, consult with an exotics veterinarian who specializes in reptile care. Most of these conditions are treatable if caught early.

Choosing Your Yellow-Bellied Slider

Before you bring home your yellowbellied slider, there are a few things to look out for to ensure it’s healthy. Make sure the turtle’s eyes are not sealed shut, and they should not be puffy or have discharge.If its shell has any soft or rough spots, this is another bad sign; it could indicate shell rot. Test its responsiveness by making sure it pulls its head and legs into its shell or tries to swim away when you attempt to pick it up. Most turtles and tortoises don’t like handling; this is normal, expected behavior.Your best source for buying a yellowbellied slider is a reputable breeder who has documented its health and history. A captive-bred, not wild-caught slider, is the best option. You can expect to pay $10 to $20 for a hatchling. Adult specimens can cost upwards of $60 to $100. These higher prices reflect the amount of care that has gone into bringing the turtle to adulthood.

Product Description

Baby Yellow Belly Slider Turtle for sale at the best prices on the Internet. Born this year, they are all very active and healthy. Just now starting to feed on our baby turtle pellet food. Myturtlestore.com recommends feeding your new baby yellow belly slider turtle two times a day in a separate bowl that is designated a feeding bowl. Put 2 or 3 of the sample turtle food into the water with your turtle. Give it about 20 minutes to eat then return the turtle to its home. Remember to always wash your hands and feeding bowl with soapy water. All turtles with a shell of less than 4inches are sold for scientific, educational and export purposes only. Here are a few things to know about your new turtle.Our baby yellow belly slider turtles are about one inch in size and will grow at about a rate of 1 to 2 inches per year. As with most water turtles the male yellow belly slider is smaller than the female. Males getting to be about 6 inches and females up to 12 inches or more. Turtles need good water filtration, a quality uva/uvb bulb, some good baby turtle food and somewhere to get out of the water to bask. If you can provide these few small things your baby yellow belly slider turtle that you buy here can be with you for 20 years or more. You can rest assured knowing that we will get your baby yellow belly slider turtle to you with no problems. We ship all our baby turtles using Ups Next Day Air and 2

Species Introduction

Yellowbellied sliders (Originally named Testudo scripta in 1792 the species was renamed to Trachemys scripta scripta in 1857 by American biologist Louis Agassiz.In the wild, yellowbellied sliders are found in the southeastern United States near bodies of water like estuaries, lakes, marshes, and swamps. The name “slider” comes from their tendency to slide off logs and muddy banks into the water at the first sign of danger.Hatchlings are born about the size of a quarter and grow to be a foot in length after eight years. But, they continue to grow slowly for their entire lives and can end up weighing over seven pounds.As they grow, sliders change their diet from primarily protein-based to a plant-based one. Pet species should eat mostly leafy green vegetables, supplemented with protein from insects. Pelleted turtle food is also a good choice.Yellowbellied sliders are a semi-aquatic turtle. This means they spend most of their time swimming, but sometimes they come on to land to bask and rest in the sun. To accommodate their lifestyle, their tank setup will need to be mostly water that is deep enough for them to fully submerge.

Are Yellow-Bellied Sliders Good Pets?

Yes, they make great pets and are charming, cute and active. Slider turtles became popular pets in the 1950s as hundreds of turtle hatchlings were sold throughout the United States.Sliders are great pets for those who are not afraid of taking on a long-term commitment. Be prepared to go through a lot of fresh vegetables and do not expect to have a cuddly pet. These turtles are not a good choice for keepers who want to handle their pets. They become easily stressed if held and are known to carry salmonella.Luckily, they are just as entertaining when left in their tank and are usually bold and inquisitive.Sliders are entertaining reptiles with a lot of personality,

Yellow-Bellied Slider Care

The trickiest part of caring for this turtle is keeping their enclosure clean. Unfortunately, many first time owners keep these pets in poor conditions which can cause outbreaks of salmonella. But, this should be no problem for intermediate and experienced herpetologists.They make fantastic pets if given enough space and fed the right diet.

Enclosure Size

Yellowbellied sliders are opportunistic feeders who eat whenever and whatever they can. This is not surprising given similar species, such as the snapping turtle, are also opportunistic feeders.What is surprising is that their diet changes as they age.Young turtles are primarily carnivores that feed on aquatic insects, worms, and small fish. As they grow into adults,

There are several high-quality aquatic turtle diets that are usually in the form of pellets. But, keep in mind that most of these diets are made for adult turtles rather than hatchlings. They can lack the protein needed by juveniles.Baby turtles do best when fed small crickets, mealworms and cockroaches four times a week. You can also feed pieces of Romaine lettuce, dandelion greens and other vegetables, so that 1/3 of their diet is plant-based.Growing turtles can be given two small meals every day. Gradually introduce more fruits and vegetables into your turtle’s diet, along with food pellets formulated for adults.Fully grown turtles should be fed mostly pellets and leafy greens, along with some aquatic plants like duckweed.Adults can also be fed crickets, shrimp, mealworms, and earthworms if you are not feeding pellets. Unlike juveniles, adults only need one meal every other day, with only 50% of their diet consisting of protein. To ensure proper nutrition, dust your turtle’s food with a multivitamin once each week.

Water

The tank water should be kept at 72 to 80°F with an underwater heater, and must be properly cleaned with a powerful aquarium filter. Sliders can thrive in freshwater, though brackish water can also be used. Brackish water for turtles can be a simple 50/50 mix of fresh and salt water (Water should be treated with a turtle-safe dechlorinator and be free from heavy metals and other pollutants. If you use brackish water, make sure to measure the salinity frequently, as the salt levels will increase as water evaporates.

Lighting and Heating

Turtles need to warm up before they can become active. Your YellowBellied slider should have a basking spot on land that reaches 90 to 100°F, as well as a cooler area that is 72 to 76°F. Both UVA and UVB lights are essential for sliders metabolize calcium. A 5% UVB bulb, often marketed as a “tropical UVB” bulb, is ideal for sliders.

Substrate

YellowBellied sliders need mostly water in their tank. In the water, the best substrate for sliders is no substrate or fine sand. Turtles can accidentally ingest gravel or pebbles, which can cause gastrointestinal impaction.Some land should also be provided for basking. Adding a plastic or wooden platform to the side of the tank is important. It should be large enough for your slider to sit comfortably on.

Décor and Plants

Yellowbellied sliders enjoy having plenty of hiding places. On land, live plants, flowerpots, plastic boxes, leaf litter and wooden logs are great décor options.Live plants like waterweed, anubias, and mosses can be used in the water portion of your tank, but keep in mind that they may be munched on.

Handling

Yellowbellied sliders live for an incredibly long time. Many are able to live for 40 years! In the wild, their long lifespan is partly because of their tough shell, which prevents attacks from other animals.Unfortunately, this protection comes with a downside. As their shell is their main line of defense, slider turtles put less energy into their immune systems. This makes them more vulnerable to bacterial diseases like mycoplasmosis and shell rot.This disease is extremely infectious and passes from turtle to turtle through mucus. If you suspect your turtle may be infected, make sure to isolate and take it to a veterinarian.Also known as ulcerative shell disease or ‘rust,’ it is caused by bacteria from dirty water. Shell rot appears as gray, white, or red flaky or slimy spots on the top and bottom of the shell. If left untreated shell rot can cause open sores and secondary infections. The best way to prevent shell rot is to keep your turtle’s tank clean and monitor it for any injuries.Regular cleaning and tank maintenance is the best way to keep your turtle healthy.

Buying Guide

The sale of turtles with a shell length of fewer than four inches is illegal in the U.S.Juvenile yellowbellied sliders are commonly sold online and at reptile shows. Depending on the sellerIt is also easy to find adults for sale because of their long lifespan. It is not unheard of for people to sell 20-year-old turtles. Buying an adult is not only more responsible, but also gives you a greater chance of getting a healthy pet.The most expensive part of owning a slider is the tank and its setup. A 100-gallon tank and accessories will cost over $300.When looking to purchase a yellowbellied slider, make sure you are buying a captive-bred turtle from a good breeder. Healthy turtles should be alert and try to escape if approached by a person.

Lifespan

Of course, there’s no way to guarantee that your turtle will live that long. But with good care, you should expect them to be around for at least a couple of decades (which is quite the long term commitment).

Appearance & Colors

The yellowbellied slider is aptly named for the look of its plastron (that’s the bottom part of the shell. It’s bright yellow and usually features black spots.On the top of the shell, also known as the carapace, the turtle is a bit more subdued. The shell is usually dark brown or black. However, vibrant yellow markings add some visual interest.The same yellow and black striping is present on the skin. For most specimens, the stripes create a beautiful pattern that meets at the nose.These turtles have interesting feet that reflect their amphibious nature. The feet have long claws, which can help to grip the soil as they make their way on land. However, each toe is webbed to make the turtle a graceful swimmer in the water!

Average Size

The average size of a yellowbellied slider depends on its gender. This is a species where males tend to be a bit smaller than females.At most, males will only get to be about nine inches long. Females, on the other hand, can reach lengths of 13 inches!

Yellow-Bellied Slider Care

Yellowbellied slider care can be a very rewarding experience. However, it’s also tougher than caring for a strictly aquatic or land-dwelling reptile.While they might adapt well to life in captivity, there are a wide range of different conditions you’ll need to stay on top of. These turtles essentially need two environments in one to stay healthy!Here are some care guidelines to help you get things just right:

Tank Size & Dimensions

Yellowbellied sliders require an enclosure that can accommodate the land and water portion of their environment. A standard aquarium can work fine, but there are also turtle-specific tanks that may serve you better.Some reptile enthusiasts even like to keep their yellowbellied sliders outside in temperate areas. Needless to say, you have a lot of options when it comes to choosing the right setup!

Tank Setup

The most important thing you need to have in the aquarium is a piece of land. While yellowbellied sliders will spend most of their time in the water, they use the land to regulate their temperature and bask in the sun.You can create a piece of land naturally with the substrate material.It will follow the waterline and allow your turtle to climb on. Make sure that the perch is big enough. Your turtle should be able to bask comfortably and have some room to turn around.Now, onto the water portion of the tank!On the bottom of the tank, use coated gravel or riverbed sand as your substrate. Make sure to clean it before adding it to the enclosure.Next, add some plants (they can be real or artificial). Yellowbellied sliders need plants to feel safe. Get a healthy mix of submerged plants and floating plants to make your turtle feel right at home.To keep the water in good shape, use a powerful filtration system. You can use a submersible biological filter or a traditional hang-on-back filter. Whatever you choose, go with a model that’s rated to treat about three times the size of the tank.Yellowbellied sliders produce a lot of waste. It won’t take much to raise ammonia levels to dangerous levels. A powerful filter will take care of that waste without missing a beat.

Temperature & Lighting

Yellowbellied sliders are diurnal, which means that they are most active during the day. These turtles rely on amply lighting to regulate their body temperature and stay healthy.You’ll need two types of lighting: a basking light and a UV light.The basking light will shine on the land portion of the tank. IThe UV light is meant to replicate natural sunlight. It provides UVA and UVB rays to promote proper nutrient metabolism (more on that later).

Humidity

Unlike other reptiles, you won’t have to worry about humidity levels in your yellowbellied slider’s habitat. The air in the enclosure will have plenty of humidity already due to the massive swimming area.If the land portion gets too dry, the turtle will simply take a dip in the water!

Water

The quality of the water in the tank is very important. We recommend using a water conditioner before you introduce your turtle to their habitat. The conditioner will get rid of any chlorine or any other chemicals that could harm your turtle.Check your filtration system every two weeks. Replace the filter medium as necessary and use a brush to keep algae levels under control. To keep ammonia and nitrate levels undetectable, perform partial water changes every few weeks.

Yellow-Bellied Slider Diet

In the wild, yellowbellied sliders are omnivores. They will gladly eat a wide variety of foods in captivity too.High-quality commercial turtle pellets fall into this category and can be relied on heavily. To supplement them, provide some leafy greens as well. These turtles enjoy Romaine lettuce, fresh parsley, dandelion greens, and even apples.Occasionally, you can offer up some live or frozen foods. Yellowbellied sliders will accept gut-loaded brown crickets and shrimp. Make sure to avoid anything too high in protein or loaded with fat.

Potential Health Issues

Most health issues are completely avoidable with proper care.Keeping your turtle’s home in pristine condition is crucial. If you don’t, your turtle could experience several diseases.Respiratory infections are pretty common. This issue causes wheezing, drooling, and puffiness in the eyes. It’s usually caused by bacteria, so stay on top of habitat maintenance.Fungal issues can take hold as well. Fungal spores can develop on your turtle’s back, causing shell rot. This is a potentially dangerous condition that will soften the shell to the point of damage. Luckily, it’s treatable with some antibacterial and antifungal water treatment.Finally, there’s the chance of metabolic bone disease. This condition affects turtles that don’t have exposure to UV light. Their bodies are unable to metabolize calcium, which results in some serious health problems.Most reptiles can be affected by metabolic bone disease. However, it’s uniquely detrimental to turtles. It can stunt the growth of the shell, making it more brittle and prone to damage.

Behavior & Temperament

Yellowbellied sliders are easy-going turtles with a penchant for exploration. Unlike other land-dwelling turtles, this species is not afraid of moving around!This high level of activity is part of the reason for their popularity. You can look over at their tank and see action at various times throughout the day.These turtles will regularly swim around the environment. You might see them hiding out in the plants or playing. When they get tired, they’ll retire to the land area of the enclosure for some basking!These reptiles are most active in the early morning. However, they will move between the water and land to regulate their body temperature throughout the day.

Handling Them

As you probably guessed, yellowbellied sliders aren’t the most cuddly pets to have around. They do not like being handled and will always prefer to be left alone in their habitat.It is possible to get your turtle a bit more comfortable with the idea of being held.Handling will almost always cause them stress. If you handle them too much, they might feel the need to bite.In situations where handling is unavoidable, it’s best to keep it to a minimum. Whenever it is required (like when you’re cleaning the enclosure), immediately move them to a separate container so they don’t get stressed.