Average Cost of a Horse?

Anyone who owns a horse will probably tell you that the initial cost of the average riding horse is really only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping a horse is a luxury for many people. But how much does the ‘averagehorse cost? What’s the difference between a free horse, a $500 horse, a $5,000 horse and one that can cost well over the $10,000 or $20,000 mark?

You might also take on a horse with a health or soundness problem, which can cost you lots of money, even though the initial purchase price was low. Of course, there’s the exception to every rulethere are gems among lower-priced or giveaway horses, but it may take a keen eye and willingness to deal with difficult issues.

A cheap horse may be more expensive in the long run if you have to contend with vet bills, specialized shoeing , and paying trainers.

How much do horses cost to buy?

The cost can range from a couple of hundred dollars to several thousands of dollars. For regular recreational use, the average cost is around $3,000, according to the University of Maine. While there’s an upfront cost to buy a horse, there are plenty of other costs associated with owning a horse.

How much does a horse cost 2020?

Those looking for a first-time horse will probably need to have anywhere from $1,500 to $3,000 in their budget for the purchase. You may be able to find a gem for less than this, but having that amount will give you the greatest number of choices. The more you have to spend, the more choices you will have.

Owning a horse isnt quite as expensive as you might think but you should still be prepared to drop a few grand if you are looking for an equine member of the family. Its estimated that nearly 7.2 million Americans own horses. Before you put your money into your new four-legged companion, you may want to explore how much should be budgeted before you saddle up. For more general help with financial planning maybe to figure out how to save money to allow you to purchase your horse consider working with a financial advisor.

Remember that horses can get sick like humans and other animals, and will need proper treatment if this comes up, including emergency costs. You can buy a part of a racehorse, and that means you are in for potential profits as the horse races and wins prizes.

Smarty Jones, the winner of the 2004 Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes, was owned by a fractional ownership group. For instance, if you have the stable to house your horse, youll save thousands of dollars in boarding costs. A partial lease would let you ride the horse a few days a week while you pay the owner a fee for maintaining the rest of the cost.

Her writing has appeared in Wirecutter, Quartz, Bankrate, Credit Karma, Huffington Post and other publications.

The reality is the cheapest part of owning a horse is usually the initial purchase. Horse owners have to account for stabling, feed, health and farrier care, tack, and barn equipment. These things can add up quickly, yet it doesnt deter most die-hard equestrians. For those that dream of their very own horse, theyll stop at nothing to make ends meet.

A well-trained dressage or show jumping Hanoverian can cost you $50,000 plus, whereas an unregistered trail horse in their teens maybe just $1,000. This price can be substantially lower in very rural areas or based on the amenities and services youre getting.

The initial cost of getting your property ready for a horse can vary greatly. One bag should last about 2 weeks for an average size horse eating 3 pounds a day.

When it comes to knowing how much horses cost and if you can afford one, you need to start crunching numbers early. From housing and feed to vet care and regular shoeing, these animals are a lot of responsibility. Yet, the payoff of having a wonderful horse in your life is, well, priceless.

Summary of estimated* annual cost of basic horse care by state: StateAverage Annual Cost Alabama$8,448Alaska$10,226Arizona$9,341Arkansas$8,522California$11,040Colorado$10,015Connecticut$10,560Delaware$9,715Florida$9,619Georgia$8,995Hawaii$11,565Idaho$9,079Illinois$9,715Indiana$8,832Iowa$8,752Kansas$8,752Kentucky$8,597Louisiana$8,832Maine$9,525Maryland$10,676Massachusetts$10,335Michigan$9,079Minnesota$9,432Mississippi$8,375Missouri$8,674Montana$9,252Nebraska$8,832Nevada$9,525New Hampshire$10,226New Jersey$11,040New Mexico$9,165New York$11,167North Carolina$8,832North Dakota$8,995Ohio$8,674Oklahoma$8,752Oregon$9,619Pennsylvania$9,525Rhode Island$9,619South Carolina$8,752South Dakota$8,597Tennessee$8,752Texas$9,432Utah$9,432Vermont$9,913Virginia$9,913Washington$10,226West Virginia$8,674Wisconsin$9,079Wyoming$9,341Typically, the most affordable states for horse ownership are:

Alabama Arkansas Kentucky Mississippi Typically, the most expensive states for horse ownership are: Hawaii New York California Ne w Jersey

Its important to remember the numbers in this article are only estimates . Click to see this useful resource at Amazon There are a lot of factors that can influence your equine bottom line.

Purchasing your horse, buying a horse trailer, taking a horseback riding lesson, and competing can all inflate your expenses (and deflate your bank account). For this article, we focus on six basic horse care components: Housing There are a a variety of housing options to choose from, including keeping your horse at home or at a boarding facility .

Full, board, partial board, self-care board, and pasture board are all sub-categories of housing your horse at another facility. Feed (Grain & Hay) Horse feed costs vary depending on your location and the individual horse. For our purposes, we estimated average grain and hay costs for one year.

Routine Vet Care Horses require routine vet care every year, including vaccinations, an annual checkup, regular deworming, and typically a fecal egg count. If you are planning on traveling with and showing your horse you will need a Coggins test and (potentially) a health certificate. FarrierDentist Dental care is critical, but sadly often overlooked.

Having the vet check teeth yearly, or twice per year if the horse is a senior or quite young. The vet will let you know if floating (i.e. evening out/filing teeth) is needed. Alabama CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,435Grain$652Hay$1,587Vet Care$304Farrier $1,326Dentist$143 TOTAL$8,448 Alaska CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,368Grain$789Hay$1,921Vet Care$368Farrier $1,605Dentist$174 TOTAL$10,226

Arizona CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,904Grain$627Hay$1,755Vet Care$337Farrier $1,466Dentist$159 TOTAL$9,341 Arkansas CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,474Grain$572Hay$1,601Vet Care$307Farrier $1,338Dentist$145 TOTAL$8,522 California CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,795Grain$741Hay$2,074Vet Care$398Farrier $1,733Dentist$188 TOTAL$11,040 Colorado CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,258Grain$672Hay$1,881Vet Care$361Farrier $1,572Dentist$170 TOTAL$10,015 Connecticut CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,543Grain$709Hay$1,984Vet Care$380Farrier $1,658Dentist$179 TOTAL$10,560 Delaware CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,100Grain$652Hay$1,825Vet Care$350Farrier $1,525Dentist$165 TOTAL$9,715 Florida CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,050Grain$646Hay$1,807Vet Care$347Farrier $1,510Dentist$163 TOTAL$9,619 Georgia CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,722Grain$604Hay$1,690Vet Care$324Farrier $1,412Dentist$153 TOTAL$8,995 Hawaii CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$6,071Grain$776Hay$2,173Vet Care$417Farrier $1,815Dentist$196 TOTAL$11,565 Idaho CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,766Grain$610Hay$1,706Vet Care$327Farrier $1,425Dentist$154 TOTAL$9,079 Illinois CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,100Grain$652Hay$1,825Vet Care$350Farrier $1,525Dentist$165 TOTAL$9,715 Indiana CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,636Grain$593Hay$1,659Vet Care$318Farrier $1,386Dentist$150 TOTAL$8,832 Iowa CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,595Grain$588Hay$1,644Vet Care$315Farrier $1,374Dentist$149 TOTAL$8,752 Kansas CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,595Grain$588Hay$1,644Vet Care$315Farrier $1,374Dentist$149 TOTAL$8,752 Kentucky CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,513Grain$577Hay$1,615Vet Care$310Farrier $1,350Dentist$146 TOTAL$8,597

Louisiana CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,636Grain$593Hay$1,659Vet Care$318Farrier $1,386Dentist$150 TOTAL$8,832 Maine CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,000Grain$639Hay$1,789Vet Care$343Farrier $1,495Dentist$162 TOTAL$9,525 Maryland CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,604Grain$717Hay$2,005Vet Care$385Farrier $1,676Dentist$181 TOTAL$10,676 Massachusetts CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,426Grain$694Hay$1,941Vet Care$372Farrier $1,622Dentist$176 TOTAL$10,335 Michigan CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,766Grain$610Hay$1,706Vet Care$327Farrier $1,425Dentist$154 TOTAL$9,079 Minnesota CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,951Grain$633Hay$1,772Vet Care$340Farrier $1,481Dentist$160 TOTAL$9,432 Mississippi CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,397Grain$562Hay$1,573Vet Care$302Farrier $1,315Dentist$142 TOTAL$8,375 Missouri CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,554Grain$582Hay$1,629Vet Care$313Farrier $1,362Dentist$147 TOTAL$8,674 Montana CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,857Grain$621Hay$1,738Vet Care$333Farrier $1,452Dentist$157 TOTAL$9,252 Nebraska CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,636Grain$593Hay$1,659Vet Care$318Farrier $1,386Dentist$150 TOTAL$8,832 Nevada CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,000Grain$639Hay$1,789Vet Care$343Farrier $1,495Dentist$162 TOTAL$9,525 New Hampshire CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,368Grain$686Hay$1,921Vet Care$368Farrier $1,605Dentist$174 TOTAL$10,226 New Jersey CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,795Grain$741Hay$2,074Vet Care$398Farrier $1,733Dentist$188 TOTAL$11,040 New Mexico CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,811Grain$615Hay$1,722Vet Care$330Farrier $1,439Dentist$156 TOTAL$9,165 New York CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,862Grain$750Hay$2,098Vet Care$402Farrier $1,753Dentist$190 TOTAL$11,167

North Carolina CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,636Grain$593Hay$1,659Vet Care$318Farrier $1,386Dentist$150 TOTAL$8,832 North Dakota CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,722Grain$604Hay$1,690Vet Care$324Farrier $1,412Dentist$153 TOTAL$8,995 Ohio CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,554Grain$582Hay$1,629Vet Care$313Farrier $1,362Dentist$147 TOTAL$8,674 Oklahoma CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,595Grain$588Hay$1,644Vet Care$315Farrier $1,374Dentist$149 TOTAL$8,752 Oregon CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,050Grain$646Hay$1,807Vet Care$347Farrier $1,510Dentist$163 TOTAL$9,619 Pennsylvania CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,000Grain$639Hay$1,789Vet Care$343Farrier $1,495Dentist$162 TOTAL$9,525 Rhode Island CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,050Grain$646Hay$1,807Vet Care$347Farrier $1,510Dentist$163 TOTAL$9,619 South Carolina CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,595Grain$588Hay$1,644Vet Care$315Farrier $1,374Dentist$149 TOTAL$8,752 South Dakota CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,513Grain$577Hay$1,615Vet Care$1,615Farrier $1,350Dentist$146 TOTAL$8,597 Tennessee CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,595Grain$588Hay$1,644Vet Care$315Farrier $1,374Dentist$149 TOTAL$8,752 Texas CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,951Grain$633Hay$1,772Vet Care$340Farrier $1,481Dentist$160 TOTAL$9,432 Utah CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,951Grain$633Hay$1,772Vet Care$340Farrier $1,481Dentist$160 TOTAL$9,432 Vermont CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,204Grain$665Hay$1,862Vet Care$357Farrier $357Dentist$168 TOTAL$9,913 Virginia CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,204Grain$665Hay$1,862Vet Care$357Farrier $357Dentist$168 TOTAL$9,913 Washington CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$5,368Grain$686Hay$1,921Vet Care$368Farrier $1,605Dentist$174 TOTAL$10,226

West Virginia CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,554Grain$582Hay$1,629Vet Care$313Farrier $1,362Dentist$147 TOTAL$8,674 Wisconsin CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,766Grain$610Hay$1,706Vet Care$327Farrier $1,425Dentist$154 TOTAL$9,079 Wyoming CategoryAnnual Cost Housing$4,904Grain$627Hay$1,755Vet Care$337Farrier $1,466Dentist$159 TOTAL$9,341 Why do horses cost so much? Horses are a living breathing animal with needs, just like us. They need proper feed, housing, veterinary care, and farrier care to stay happy and healthy.

As weve just covered, the cost of all of these items does vary by state, but they can also vary a bit by horse and your situation. Many horse owners choose to save on boarding costs by keeping their horse at home, though that comes with a different set of expenses. Preventative vet care also helps to reduce unexpected medical costs, which is why keeping your horse up-to-date on vaccinations, teeth, and hoof care is important.

Do you have to be rich to have a horse? No! You do not need to be rich to have a horse (though it certainly helps).

Owning a horse can be achievable for many income levels, especially if you create a budget of anticipated expenses and stick to it. Thinking ahead will save you a lot of money in the long run. Purchasing used equipment and tack, or getting vaccines done during a on-farm vaccination clinic, are also great ways to reduce your horse costs.

How much money do you need to get a horse? Make sure you have enough money for the anticipated ongoing care expenses, not only the purchase price of the horse. If you take a look at our state-by-state calculations above, it will give you a good idea of what your horse will cost on a monthly and yearly basis.

You should also allocate for one-time or infrequent expenses like tack, blankets, building housing and fencing (if the horse is staying on your property), a horse trailer , and a vehicle to haul your trailer. Keep in mind, all of these items are not necessarily required. Many depend on your situation, what you are planning on doing with your horse, and where your animal are housed.

What is the cheapest horse? Horses can be purchased from many places, including auctions, for low prices. While there are some amazing horses to be found in these unfortunate situations, be very cautious.

Have your veterinarian do a complete health check to discover any health or soundness issues. If you are able, it is also nice to spend some time with the horse and get a better idea of its personality. Often, you will not be able to find out much about the horses background or training at an auction, but a calm personality can tell you a lot.

Do your due diligence to make sure your cheap horse doesnt become a very expensive vet or training bill once you get it home. How can I get a free horse? Horses can sometimes be adopted or rehomed for free. A note of caution on all free horses they do not stay free.

You will have the same general expenses for any horse, regardless of the purchase price. Learn what you can about the horses situation and history. Unfortunately, some of these horses have behavior issues or past injuries that prompted the original owners to give them away.

This is not always the case, but it is certainly something to look into before you make a commitment. Is it hard to own a horse? Owning a horse takes time, hard work, and a solid budget.

If you are unable to commit to any of these areas, it will be much harder to own a horse. Carefully consider the resources available for a horse prior to purchase. While you may not need to go to a boarding facility every day, if your horse is at home you are fully committed to at least two meals a day and daily stall cleaning.

How can you afford a horse in college? Affording a horse in college can be challenging. If you are close to home, you can offer to work at the barn cleaning stalls, doing repairs, or even exercising horses for reduced board.

Many barn owners are willing to work with students and get creative. Depending on your horse, you can also consider a partial lease or ask your trainer to add your horse to their lesson program to help with the expenses while you are in school. If you are going to school far away, you could offer a full lease to a friend or your trainer.

Some lease agreements will cover all of the expenses of the horse. P.S. Enjoy this article?

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How Upkeep Costs Affect Price

Poor hay crops and rising feed and fuel costs can affect the number of horses for sale and can affect the asking prices of those horses in any given year. The side effect of the banning of horses for meat slaughter is a lower price for some types of horses. This mainly affects horses that are elderly, unsound, young and/or untrained, but it does have a ripple effect on the general horse market.Those looking for a first-time horse will probably need to have anywhere from $1,500 to $3,000 in their budget for the purchase. You may be able to find a gem for less than this, but having that amount will give you the greatest number of choices. The more you have to spend, the more choices you will have.

The Cost of Ponies

Ponies might be smaller in stature than horses, but that doesn’t mean their purchase or upkeep costs are proportionally smaller.The cost of a good pony can be the same or higher than a horse. Expect prices for suitable first ponies to be about $1,000 and upwards.

The Real Cost of a Free Horse

A free horse will probably live up to the old adage, “Never look a gift horse in the mouth.” Usually, the horse will be a senior citizen, a youngster with poor prospects or little training, or a horse with behavioral issues. Yes, it’s possible to get a really great free horse—like a senior citizen who is level-headed and serviceably sound, whose owner just wants a nice retirement home for it. However, these horses are rare and there’s a possibility you’re taking on someone’s problem.You might also take on a horse with a health or soundness problem, which can cost you lots of money, even though the initial purchase price was low.

Housing

When it comes to knowing how much horses cost and if you can afford one, you need to start crunching numbers early. From housing and feed to vet care and regular shoeing, these animals are a lot of responsibility. Yet, the “payoff” of having a wonderful horse in your life is, well, priceless.Read on to learn about key expenses you need to be prepared for, as well as a detailed breakdown of typical costs for each state.
Summary ofTypically, theTypically, the

Feed (Grain & Hay)

Horse feed costs vary depending on your location and the individual horse. For our purposes, we estimated average grain and hay costs for one year.

Routine Vet Care

Horses require routine “vet care” every year, including vaccinations, an annual checkup, regular deworming, and typically a fecal egg count.If you are planning on traveling with and showing your horse you will need a Coggins test and (potentially) a health certificate.

Farrier

Most horses require shoeing every 4-6 weeks. Even if your horse is barefoot, (i.e. don’t wear shoes ) still need to be trimmed regularly.

Dentist

Dental care is critical, but sadly often overlooked. Having the vet check teeth yearly, or twice per year if the horse is a senior or quite young. The vet will let you know if floating (i.e. evening out/filing teeth) is needed.

Why do horses cost so much?

Horses are a living breathing animal with needs, just like us. They need proper feed, housing, veterinary care, and farrier care to stay happy and healthy. As we’ve just covered, the cost of all of these items does vary by state, but they can also vary a bit by horse and your situation. Many horse owners choose to save on boarding costs by keeping their horse at home, though that comes with a different set of expenses. Preventative vet care also helps to reduce unexpected medical costs, which is why keeping your horse up-to-date on vaccinations, teeth, and hoof care is important.

What is the cheapest horse?

Horses can be purchased from many places, including auctions, for low prices. While there are some amazing horses to be found in these unfortunate situations, be very cautious. Have your veterinarian do a complete health check to discover any health or soundness issues. If you are able, it is also nice to spend some time with the horse and get a better idea of its personality. Often, you will not be able to find out much about the horse’s background or training at an auction, but a calm personality can tell you a lot. Do your due diligence to make sure your cheap horse doesn’t become a very expensive vet or training bill once you get it home.

How can I get a free horse?

Horses can sometimes be adopted or rehomed for “free.” A note of caution on all “free” horses — they do not stay free. You will have the same general expenses for any horse, regardless of the purchase price. Learn what you can about the horse’s situation and history. Unfortunately, some of these horses have behavior issues or past injuries that prompted the original owners to give them away. This is not always the case, but it is certainly something to look into before you make a commitment.

Is it hard to own a horse?

Owning a horse takes time, hard work, and a solid budget. If you are unable to commit to any of these areas, it will be much harder to own a horse. Carefully consider the resources available for a horse prior to purchase. While you may not need to go to a boarding facility every day, if your horse is at home you are fully committed to at least two meals a day and daily stall cleaning.