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Sugar an adult Texas Heeler (Australian Cattle dog mixed with an Australian Shepherd) Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x American Eskimo Dog mix = Aussimo Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x American Pit Bull Terrier mix = Pit Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Australian Kelpie mix = Kelpie Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Australian Shepherd Dog mix = Texas Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog mix = Stump Double Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Basset Hound mix = Basset Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Beagle mix = Beagle Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Bernese Mountain Dog mix = Bernese Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Border Collie mix = Border Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Boston Terrier mix = Boston Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Boxer mix = Box Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Catahoula Leopard Dog mix = Catahoula Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Chinese Shar-Pei mix = Heeler Pei Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Cocker Spaniel mix = Blue Spaniel Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Collie mix = Cattle Collie Dog Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Dachshund mix = Doxie Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Dalmatian mix = Dalmatian Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Doberman Pinscher mix = Dobie Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x German Shepherd mix = Cattle Shepherd Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Labrador Retriever mix = Labraheeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Pembroke Welsh Corgi mix = Corgi Cattle Dog Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Rat Terrier mix = Rat Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Rottweiler mix = Rottie Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Shetland Sheepdog mix = Sheltie Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Shih Tzu mix = Blue-Tzu Heeler Australian Cattle Dog (Heeler) x Siberian Husky mix = Ausky Other Australian Cattle Dog Breed Names Australian Heeler Hall’s Heeler Queensland Heeler Blue Heeler Red Heeler Australian Cattledog Australischer Treibhund ACD

Are Australian Cattle Dog mix good dogs?

The Australian Cattle Dog is good family dog, but he does best with children if he’s raised with them and accepts them early on as members of his household. In such cases, he’s very playful and protective. The breed’s tendency to be mouthy — even to nip and bite — can be a problem with kids, however.

What are Australian Cattle Dogs usually mixed with?

Australian Cattle Dogs are the culmination of cross-breeding the Blue Merle and the Australian Dingo by British settlers in Australia in the late 1800s. These working dogs have plenty of energy and love to run. They’re devoted to their people and can be good for families—as long they have an outlet for all that energy.

Is Australian Cattle Dog an aggressive breed?

NO, Owners agree, Australian Cattle Dogs are not aggressive. But, they are courageous, and will stand their ground when necessary. … They can be true of any dog of any breed. These things, even if sometimes true, do not make Australian Cattle Dogs aggressive.

How big do Australian Cattle Dog mixes get?

As the Texas Heeler is somewhat new mixed breed, there are few standards when it comes to size. That said, as a mix between Australian Cattle Dog and an Australian Shepherd, you can expect Texas Heelers to be on the medium side. Most weigh in at 25 to 5o pounds and are 16 to 22 inches tall from the shoulder.

The Australian Cattle Dog is of moderate build, enabling this breed to combine great endurance with bursts of speed and extreme agility necessary in herding cattle. This dog is sturdy and compact, slightly longer than it is tall. The Australian Cattle Dog’s gait is supple and tireless, and must be capable of quick and sudden movement. The weather-resistant coat consists of a short, dense undercoat and moderately short, straight outer coat of medium texture.

In the early 1800s, vast land areas in Australia became available for grazing cattle. The cattle raised on these lands became so wild and intractable that the traditional European herding breeds that had proved satisfactory on tamer cattle were no longer suited for the job. A dog was needed that could withstand traveling long distances over rough terrain in hot weather and that could control cattle without barking (which only served to make wild cattle wilder). In 1840, a man named Hall bred some smooth blue merle Highland Collies to Dingos, producing a strain known as Hall’s Heelers. Other breeders crossed their Hall’s Heelers with other breeds, including the Bull Terrier, Dalmatian, and, later, Black and Tan Kelpie, a sheepherding breed. The result was a dog with the herding instincts of the Collie and Kelpie, the endurance, ruggedness, and quiet style of the Dingo, and the horse sense and protectiveness of the Dalmatian, all with a distinctively patterned coat. A standard for the breed, emphasizing the Dingo characteristics, was drawn up in 1897. When given a chance, they proved their merits and were welcomed as herders and pets. Smart, hardy, independent, stubborn, tenacious, energetic, and untiring— these are all traits essential to a driver of headstrong cattle, and all traits of the Australian Cattle Dog. Given challenging mental and hard physical exercise daily, this breed is among the most responsive and obedient of dogs. A good jog or long workout, coupled with obedience lessons or other intellectual challenges, is essential every day; a bored ACD can be destructive. The coat needs brushing or combing weekly to remove dead hairs. Major concerns: CHD, OCD, deafness, PRA, elbow dysplasia Minor concerns: none Occasionally seen: cataract, lens luxation, PPM, vWD Suggested tests: hip, hearing, eye, elbow, DNA for PRA, DNA for lens luxation Life span: 10–13 years Note: While the characteristics mentioned here may frequently represent this breed, dogs are individuals whose personalities and appearances will vary. Please consult the adoption organization for details on a specific pet.

The compact but muscular Australian Cattle Dog, also called Blue Heeler or Queensland Heeler, is related to Australia’s famous wild dog, the Dingo. These resilient herders are intelligent enough to routinely outsmart their owners.

The Australian Cattle Dog is an extremely intelligent, active, and sturdy dog breed. Developed by Australian settlers to handle herds of cattle on expansive ranches, they’re still used today as a herding dog. They thrive on having a job to do and on being part of all family activities.

Low-sensitivity dogs, also called “easygoing,” “tolerant,” “resilient,” and even “thick-skinned,” can better handle a noisy, chaotic household, a louder or more assertive owner, and an inconsistent or variable routine. Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people. These breeds generally aren’t a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they’re more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who’s elderly or frail. Adding Glyde Mobility Chews to your senior’s routine can help fight the symptoms of arthritis and keep your old dog active and playful. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they’re free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments. This breed was instrumental in helping ranchers expand the Australian beef industry by quietly but aggressively herding the sometimes uncontrollable, almost wild cattle with nips and bites. Kaleski drew up a standard, basing the Cattle Dog on the Dingo, believing that this was the type naturally suited to the Australian outback. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills. In Australian Cattle Dogs, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) for hip dysplasia (with a score of fair or better), elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand’s disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) certifying that eyes are normal. Brush your Australian Cattle Dog’s teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you’ll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he’s an adult. As you groom, check for sores, rashes, or signs of infection such as redness, tenderness, or inflammation on the skin, in the nose, mouth, and eyes, and on the feet. Most problems can be solved by carefully socializing the Australian Cattle Dog puppy to children, and by teaching him bite inhibition.

Form and Function

Breed Traits

Energy Level

Exercise Requirements

Playfulness

Affection Level

Friendliness To Dogs

Friendliness To Other Pets

Friendliness To Strangers

Watchfulness

Ease of Training

Grooming Requirements

Heat Sensitivity

Vocality

Breed Attributes

Type

Herding

Weight

35-45 lb

Height

17-20″

Family

Livestock, Herding

Area of Origin

Australia

Date of Origin

1800s

Other Names

Queensland Heeler, Blue Heeler, Hall’s Heeler, Red Heeler

History

In the early 1800s, vast land areas in Australia became available for grazing cattle. The cattle raised on these lands became so wild and intractable that the traditional European herding breeds that had proved satisfactory on tamer cattle were no longer suited for the job. A dog was needed that could withstand traveling long distances over rough terrain in hot weather and that could control cattle without barking (which only served to make wild cattle wilder).In 1840, a man named Hall bred some smooth blue merle Highland Collies to Dingos, producing a strain known as Hall’s Heelers. One particularly influential dog was named Bentley’s Dog, and is credited with originating the white blaze found on the head of Australian Cattle Dogs today. Other breeders crossed their Hall’s Heelers with other breeds, including the Bull Terrier, Dalmatian, and, later, Black and Tan Kelpie, a sheepherding breed. The result was a dog with the herding instincts of the Collie and Kelpie, the endurance, ruggedness, and quiet style of the Dingo, and the horse sense and protectiveness of the Dalmatian, all with a distinctively patterned coat.As the dogs became increasingly vital to the cattle industry of Queensland, they gained the name Queensland Blue Heeler. They later became known as Australian Heeler, and then Australian Cattle Dog. A standard for the breed, emphasizing the Dingo characteristics, was drawn up in 1897. The Australian Cattle Dog was slow to catch on in America, however, perhaps because the breed bore little resemblance to established herding breeds. When given a chance, they proved their merits and were welcomed as herders and pets. The AKC recognized the breed in 1980.

Temperament

Smart, hardy, independent, stubborn, tenacious, energetic, and untiring— these are all traits essential to a driver of headstrong cattle, and all traits of the Australian Cattle Dog. Given challenging mental and hard physical exercise daily, this breed is among the most responsive and obedient of dogs. The Cattle Dog tends to nip at heels of running children, but is good with older children.

Upkeep

The Australian Cattle Dog is active and tireless. A good jog or long workout, coupled with obedience lessons or other intellectual challenges, is essential every day; a bored ACD can be destructive. They are happiest when they have a job to perform, and especially when that job is herding. This breed is unsuited for apartment life. The coat needs brushing or combing weekly to remove dead hairs.

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Australian Cattle Dog

The Australian Cattle Dog is an extremely intelligent, active, and sturdy dog breed. Developed by Australian settlers to handle herds of cattle on expansive ranches, they’re still used today as a herding dog. They thrive on having a job to do and on being part of all family activities.Even though these are purebred dogs, you may find them in the care of shelters or rescue groups. Remember to adopt! Don’t shop if you want to bring a dog home.Australian Cattle Dogs are loyal and protective of their families, though wary of outsiders. Besides herding work, they do well at canine sports, including agility, obedience, rally, flyball, and flying disc competitions. Novice pet parents and apartment dwellers beware; these dogs need a lot —See below for complete list of dog breed traits and facts about Australian Cattle Dogs!

Australian Cattle Dog Breed Pictures

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