Are Roses Toxic to Cats?

Are roses OK around cats?

Roses (Rosa sp.), like any flower, can cause mild stomach upset but aren’t incredibly toxic to pets. However, watch out for thorns! These may potentially cause trauma to the mouth and to the paws.

Can roses make cats sick?

While roses are not toxic to cats, they can be dangerous if your cat plays with the rosebush and the thorns scratch their face or eyes. If they eat the stems or leaves, your cat could end up with slight gastrointestinal upset.

Are roses pet safe?

Roses are non-toxic to pets, making them a fairly good option for landscaping for pet owners. They’re a good option for cut flowers inside, as well, since they won’t hurt your indoor pet if they consume any fallen pedals. … Thorns: The real problem that you’ll run into with roses is the thorns.

Which flower is very toxic to cats?

Although many plants contain the word “lily” in their name, Dr. Wismer says, certain species are the most dangerous to cats, including Asiatic lilies, Easter lilies, Japanese show lilies, rubrum lilies, stargazer lilies, red lilies, tiger lilies, Western lilies, wood lilies, and daylilies.

There are more than 150 species of roses (Rosa spp.), and when you put roses and cats together, there is a good chance your feline friend will enjoy snacking on these beautiful flowers. Fortunately, roses are not toxic to your cat, although there is a risk that she will harm herself on the sharp thorns. Roses grow in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 5 through 9 depending on the species and cultivar, notes Missouri Botanical Garden.

The single or double flowers come in a variety of colors, including red, pink, yellow, white, purple and orange. This means that if your cat nibbles on thornless green leaves or the colorful petals of your garden roses, she may experience some mild gastrointestinal symptoms but will be just fine.

The thorns can scratch your cat’s skin and eyes if he rubs against the rose bush or can become embedded in his paws if he steps on fallen branches. It can be challenging to keep an agile feline from jumping up to high ledges, so there are few places to put toxic plants where you can enjoy them and still have them out of reach. University of Florida IFAS Gardening Solutions notes that although removing the thorns causes wounds, it is still advisable to do so for the safety of your cat.

Theres no denying the beauty of freshly-cut tulips or a garden bed of lilies, but flowers like these can make cats sick or even be fatal. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center reports that both indoor and outdoor plants are among the top 10 toxins pets most frequently ingest.

Plants produce toxins as a survival mechanism, says Dr. Karyn Bischoff , a board-certified veterinary toxicologist at the New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center in Ithaca, New York.Plants cant run away, so they have to come up with other ways to prevent getting eaten by insects and animals. Because cats dont have hands that can manipulate objects like we do, they default to using their mouths, which gives some toxins immediate access to their body, adds Kelley.

Depending on the type of flower and amount ingested, symptoms can vary from mild to fatal, says Kelley. Other plants can damage the liver or kidneys, sometimes irreversibly, or cause cardiac arrhythmias or neurologic side effects, including seizures and even death, adds Kelley. When reviewing any list of non-poisonous or poisonous plants for cats, keep in mind that some names can be misleading.

One of springs most aromatic flowers, the common lilac ( Syringa vulgaris ) is a violet-colored shrub that can also come in shades of lavender, burgundy, white, yellow, and blue. Orchids are part of the highly-diverse Orchidaceae family, a group of fragrant, flowering plants that most often present in various shades of pink. In a worst-case scenario, a cat who ingests orchids might experience mild vomiting and diarrhea, says Bischoff.

The common prickly-stemmed rose (of the Rosa genus) is a perennial shrub that typically yields flowers in red, pink, and yellow. One of early springs typical flowers, tulips actually belong to the lily family ( Liliaceae ). True lilies ( Lilium ) and daylilies ( Hemerocalis ) are so incredibly toxic to cats that they arent ever allowed in my house, says Bischoff.

Early symptoms of lily poisoning include excessive salivation or drooling, vomiting, and lethargy, which can range from mild to noticeable, says Kelley. Any exposure is considered a severe emergency, and decontamination and detoxification with supportive care is key to long term survival and minimizing damage, he says. Mums are some of autumns most widely-grown flowers, presenting in deep orange, burgundy, purple, and yellow.

They contain multiple toxic compounds that can cause vomiting, hyper-salivation, diarrhea, incoordination, and even skin inflammation from contact with some varieties, explains Kelley. Pyrethrin is a natural insecticide that can cause some skin irritation, increased salivation, nausea, and vomiting in cats, both because of the effects on nerves and because they have a very bitter flavor. Sunflowers are also generally considered non-toxic for cats, but veterinarians say they may cause minor stomach upset or vomiting if ingested.

Hydrangeas are woody plants that yield rounded clusters of flowers in colors like white, lavender, and blue. Some of the compounds in hydrangeas can theoretically break down to cyanide gas in the stomach, I would definitely advise against letting your cat eat these, says Bischoff. Always research the flower youre planning to purchase, whether its an indoor or outdoor plant, recommends Dr. Tina Wismer, senior director at ASPCAs Animal Poison Control Center and a board-certified veterinary toxicologist.

If you have larger houseplants, sometimes putting rocks or other deterrents on top of the soil can limit cat access and prevent your plants from becoming another litter box.

A rose by any other name might smell just as sweet, but some plants with “rose” in their names are toxic to your cat, according to the Humane Society. Dont let the word rose in a plants common name fool you into believing the plant cant hurt Fluffy.

These ornamental garden plants — popular in Europe as Christmas decorations — are poisonous, so keep your curious kitties away from them. This shrub can grow up to 4 feet high and produces white or lavender flowers with dark throats.

They are easy to care for and come in a variety of colors, which makes them popular as ground cover and for container plantings. There are 450 species of this perennial in the wild, ranging in size from a few inches high to more than a yard tall. Primrose oil has long served as an astringent and as a topical treatment for eczema and rheumatoid arthritis.

Tip

The green leaves on roses are not poisonous to cats.

Roses and Cats

There are more than 150 species of roses and many more cultivars that produce showy and fragrant blossoms. The single or double flowers come in a variety of colors, including red, pink, yellow, white, purple and orange. All plants of the Rosa genus are classified as nontoxic to cats, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. This means that if your cat nibbles on thornless green leaves or the colorful petals of your garden roses, she may experience some mild gastrointestinal symptoms but will be just fine.While no part of the plant is poisonous to your feline friend, the sharp thorns found along the rose bush stems and branches can be problematic, warns Pet Poison Helpline. The thorns can scratch your cat’s skin and eyes if he rubs against the rose bush or can become embedded in his paws if he steps on fallen branches. If your cat ingests the thorns, he may experience more serious problems, including injury to the mouth and bowel obstruction. Some symptoms include drooling, pawing at the mouth, lack of appetite, abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea.

Cats and Plant Safety

To keep your cat safe, keep her away from the roses in your garden and be sure to remove the thorns from any cut roses you bring indoors. If your cat does injure herself on the thorny branches, contact your veterinarian.While roses with the thorns removed are a popular cut flower that you and your cat can safely enjoy in your home, there are plenty of popular houseplants that are toxic to your cat. Before bringing any new plant into your home or into your garden if you have an outdoor cat, consult the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals list of plants that are toxic to cats.It can be challenging to keep an agile feline from jumping up to high ledges, so there are few places to put toxic plants where you can enjoy them and still have them out of reach. It is usually best to simply avoid these plants completely and choose safer options.

Roses

Roses are not toxic to cats, but they do have thorns. If your cat plays in a rosebush or tries to eat its leaves and stems, he could get an upset stomach and scratch up his skin and face. Also, if you’ve used topical chemicals on your bush, they could make him sick. But if your cat rearranges your lovely rose bouquet and even decides to nibble a few of the rose petals, the only harm he’s likely to encounter is a good tongue-lashing from you.

Christmas Rose

Christmas roses, also known as Easter roses or Lenten roses, have the scientific name Helleborus niger. This evergreen perennial reaches about 13 inches in height and blooms from December to April. These ornamental garden plants — popular in Europe as Christmas decorations — are poisonous, so keep your curious kitties away from them.

Desert Rose

The desert rose is also called the desert azalea, the Sabi star, the impala lily or the kudu lily. Its scientific name is Adenium obesum. This shrub can grow up to 4 feet high and produces white or lavender flowers with dark throats. The flowers look similar to azalea flowers. The desert rose’s sap is poisonous; if you plant the desert rose in your yard, keep your shrub-chewing cats inside.

Moss Rose

Moss roses are annual succulents that thrive in heat, drought and poor soil. They are easy to care for and come in a variety of colors, which makes them popular as ground cover and for container plantings. They also go by the names portulaca, rock moss, purslane, pigweed and pusley. Their scientific name is Portulaca oleracea. Moss roses are toxic to cats.

Primrose

The scientific name of this plant is Primula vulgaris. There are 450 species of this perennial in the wild, ranging in size from a few inches high to more than a yard tall. It grows easily and is a popular garden plant. Primrose oil has long served as an astringent and as a topical treatment for eczema and rheumatoid arthritis. Don’t use it on your furry friend, though; it is toxic to cats and can cause vomiting.

Rosebay

Rosebay, also called rhododendron, great laurel or azalea, is poisonous to cats. This flowering shrub grows from 15 to 30 feet tall. With over 250 species, the rosebay is popular in home landscapes because of its prolific blooms that come in a variety of colors. The leaves are the most toxic part of this plant, and a very small amount can kill a curious cat.