Are Ragdoll Cats Hypoallergenic?

A ragdoll cat is a beautiful and rare breed that has very unique traits. They are known as Ragdoll cats because of their excessive amounts of fur and long hairs. Lots of people who have Ragdoll cats often complain about certain dilemmas and state that the information about the breed is misleading. Because of this lots of ragdoll owners start looking for new homes as they find it hard to cope with the animal.This article however will be clearing up some misconceptions and describing 7 important facts that people need to know about Ragdoll cats.

Ragdoll cats however dont have this particular undercoat and due to this fact most people assume their not hypoallergenic. Besides just like other cats, ragdolls use their tongues to clean themselves, which mean theres saliva on their fur balls too, so being allergic to them is a possibility.

When doing online research or looking to adopt a ragdoll, certain websites dont post genuine information.

Do ragdoll cats shed alot?

Ragdolls are longhaired cats, so you have to expect a certain amount of shedding from this breed. But they don’t shed as much as you might think, given their thick coats. … In the winter, your Ragdoll will develop a thicker coat, which they will have to shed come spring.

Which cat is most hypoallergenic?

1 – Sphynx. The strikingly unusual looking Sphynx – no hair, no allergies. ….2 – Cornish Rex. A Cornish Rex cat with a beautiful tabby coat – and one that won’t provoke allergies. ….3 – Devon Rex. ….4 – Oriental. ….5 – Russian Blue. ….6 – Balinese. ….7 – Siberian. ….8 Bengal.

Do Ragdolls have a lot of dander?

Ragdoll Dander and Saliva Levels. Just like most other cat breeds, Ragdolls produce a substantial amount of these substances. If you’re prone to breathing allergies, dander and other allergens trapped in the cats fur will be released into the air when they shed.

Do Ragdoll cats get attached to their owners?

Ragdolls are known to be very outgoing and friendly all around, which means they are not prone to get attached to only one person. In fact, they love human companionship altogether and they will prove this by getting along with everyone in the household.

Ragdolls make great pets as well as show cats due to their calm and personable demeanor on top of having an irresistibly soft and fluffy coat of fur. These are only a few of the great qualities that Ragdoll cats bring to the table, in addition to being virtually hypoallergenic. Allowing sensitive cat lovers to adopt a feline companion of their own.

Other important care that you can perform for your Ragdoll cat include trimming their nails regularly and wiping out their ears with a damp cloth. Depending on who you adopt your Ragdoll cat for, and whether you intend to just have them as your house pet, show them in contests, or maybe even breed them is what will ultimately determine their cost.

Doing research on the breeder is also important so that you know that you wont be paying such a large sum of money for a cat with potential health problems.

Fluffballs, walking clouds, a cute mop with legs: Ragdolls have many names to describe their fluffy majesty. All this hair and sweetness is most likely bringing up an important question: Are Ragdoll cats hypoallergenic?

Some people are only mildly allergic and can be completely fine with Ragdolls, while others can fall into a sneezing fit as soon as they enter a Raggies domain. There are a few common categories of allergies in cats, like food, seasonal changes, fleas and ticks, and their environment.

Allergies come into effect when a foreign substance or object enters our bodies and our immune systems react accordingly. These foreign substances can be anything from pollen, bee venom, and dust, to certain foods or even chemicals the list is long and extensive. Dander builds up in the undercoat (it has a flaky consistency) and is the culprit causing those red noses and swollen eyes.

These proteins, combined with the dander, can cause a variety of unpleasant symptoms in allergy sufferers, including: Sneezing and coughing Hay fever-like symptoms Nasal and sinus congestion Asthma attacks Skin rashes and hives (very rare) So when it comes to our adorable stars of the show, Raggies, they can mainly cause allergies from their saliva, which unfortunately contains the Fel D1 protein.

Some people are only mildly allergic and can be completely fine with Ragdolls, while others can fall into a sneezing fit as soon as they enter a Raggies domain. There are a few common categories of allergies in cats, like food, seasonal changes, fleas and ticks, and their environment. Generally speaking, if your cat has a healthy immune system, with zero to low irritants or issues, they will be scratching and shaking less.

They collect a variety of potentially irritating substances, not limited to just cat hair and dander, but also dust and other particles. Ragdoll Cat Cleaning your home is, of course, a top priority to minimize any potential allergens lurking about. The good news is that a pet vacuum is perfect for sorting out these allergen breeding grounds.

Doing your laundry regularly can eliminate this for the most part, as the washing cycle kills all allergens hiding in your clothes. As much as cats love water, it might be a good idea to get your fur child used to a regular bathing schedule. A nice, gentle pet shampoo will be perfect for your Ragdoll, to avoid drying out their skin too much.

So now your sneezing fit is over, you should be able to better analyze your home and life, allowing you to spend some quality time with your Ragdoll.

Ragdolls are lovely cats that are known for their affectionate nature. A unique fact we discovered about this breed is that its name Ragdoll was derived from the tendency of this breed going limp and relaxing when picked up.

Ragdoll Cat Breed: Hypoallergenic

Ragdoll cats, as a breed, have a calm, friendly, and loving disposition in general.Compared to most other breeds, Ragdoll cats are incredibly dependent on their owners and absolutely love getting attention and being cuddled with. They actually get their name from the way they react when someone picks them up. Ragdolls notoriously go limp like a ragdoll when picked up. This trait earned them the nickname of “Floppy Cat”.Aside from their loving personality, Ragdoll cats are well known for their big and fluffy fur coat. This special fur coat is the key to their seemingly hypoallergenic quality. It might come as a surprise to find out that these fluffy cats do not have an undercoat. Most domesticated cats do have an undercoat. This coat of fur is what is responsible for a cat’s fur shedding, and consequently, their owner’s allergies. As such, this cat is virtually non-shedding.Without this undercoat, a Ragdoll cat is virtually hypoallergenic to those who suffer from allergies related to cats. However, this depends on the individual’s personal response to cat fur/dander as well as their saliva. There is a protein in most cat’s saliva that is responsible for many people’s allergies to cats. Those who have an allergy to the protein in cat saliva will still have an allergy when they encounter a Ragdoll cat. Those with allergies to a cat’s undercoat will have more success with owning a Ragdoll cat.

Grooming Your Ragdoll Cat

Just because a Ragdoll doesn’t have an undercoat doesn’t mean they don’t need upkeep and regular grooming as part of cat care. The fur of a Ragdoll cat is long, silky, and doesn’t usually mat up very easily. Although, it is recommended to brush your Ragdoll’s fur at least two times per week. This will help to prevent any mats from forming as well as reduce any shedding that may be occurring.Grooming your Ragdoll cat regularly comes with more benefits than just a nice fur coat. This also gives you the time to bond with your Ragdoll and spend some quality time together. While grooming you can also examine them for any lumps or abnormalities that might need further investigation by their vet.Other important care that you can perform for your Ragdoll cat include trimming their nails regularly and wiping out their ears with a damp cloth. Giving them a bath is not usually necessary as long as their fur coat is kept up with otherwise.

How Much Does a Ragdoll Cost?

Depending on who you adopt your Ragdoll cat for, and whether you intend to just have them as your house pet, show them in contests, or maybe even breed them is what will ultimately determine their cost. Depending on these variables, their cost can range from $850-$2400.When considering adopting a Ragdoll kitten for any purpose, be sure the breeder that you are adopting from is reputable and trustworthy. As kittens, Ragdoll cats could be mistaken for any other breed of cat. It’s not uncommon for scammers to try and sell other breeds of cats for the cost of a purebred Ragdoll cat.Doing research on the breeder is also important so that you know that you won’t be paying such a large sum of money for a cat with potential health problems. Just know that it’s okay to call the breeder and ask questions about the kitten you plan to adopt as well as their parents and health history. The breeder may become offended and accuse you of “prying” but don’t let that deter you. Ragdoll kittens don’t come cheap, it’s good that you know what you are paying for.

Are Ragdoll Cats Hypoallergenic?

So when it comes to our adorable stars of the show, Raggies, they can mainly cause allergies from their saliva, which unfortunately contains the Fel D1 protein. Some people are only mildly allergic and can be completely fine with Ragdolls, while others can fall into a sneezing fit as soon as they enter a Raggie’s domain.When you want to bring a cat into your life and home, you should be sure beforehand where your level of allergies lies. Of course, for some people, it may come as an unpleasant surprise that they may only discover after introducing a cat in their home (and their hearts).

Can Ragdolls have Allergies?

Just like humans, ragdolls, and other cats, can develop allergies of their own. There are a few common categories of allergies in cats, like food, seasonal changes, fleas and ticks, and their environment.Their environmental allergies can be things like dust, mold, even grass. Flea bites can cause a mild allergic reaction, such as excessive scratching. While food allergies can be expressed in the form of vomiting, itchiness, or diarrhea.If you do suspect any sort of allergies, mild or severe, it is usually a good idea to check in with your vet. They will be able to determine the nature of the reaction, as well as any potential treatment and how to avoid future reactions.

Cats: What Causes Allergies?

Unfortunately, allergies have many causes, especially for those who are affected quite badly. Allergies come into effect when a foreign substance or object enters our bodies and our immune systems react accordingly.These foreign substances can be anything from pollen, bee venom, and dust, to certain foods or even chemicals – the list is long and extensive. And, of course, some of these reasons include animals, more specifically, their hair or saliva. Most people who are allergic to cats are allergic either to their undercoat or their saliva.

Allergies 101 – The Undercoat

Generally speaking, cats have 2 coats of fur: the undercoat and the top coat. The undercoat is the softer, fluffier hair close to the skin, that provides warmth and protection to the kitty. This is also the part of a cat’s hair that can mat quite easily, thus requiring brushing to maintain.The top coat is made up of awn hairs and guard hairs, both serving the purpose of being the outer, main coat of the cat. The guard hairs are those coarser hairs you will see that stick out from their furry bodies, they usually determine the colors of the cat, and helps in keeping them dry.The undercoat is what all the fuss is about, as this is one of the two things an allergy sufferer can be allergic to. Dander builds up in the undercoat (it has a flaky consistency) and is the culprit causing those red noses and swollen eyes. It is microscopic pieces of cat skin that can become airborne and spread throughout the whole house if left unchecked.

Ragdolls and Allergies

The other main cause of allergies from kitties is their saliva. More specifically the proteins in it., This protein called Fel D1 can affect allergy sufferers to varying extents. Strangely enough, some cat breeds produce more, or less, of this protein, often garnering a hyper- or hypoallergenic status. Neutered and female cats also produce less protein than unaltered cats.These proteins, combined with the dander, can cause a variety of unpleasant symptoms in allergy sufferers, including:

Can Ragdolls have Allergies?

Just like humans, ragdolls, and other cats, can develop allergies of their own. There are a few common categories of allergies in cats, like food, seasonal changes, fleas and ticks, and their environment.Their environmental allergies can be things like dust, mold, even grass. Flea bites can cause a mild allergic reaction, such as excessive scratching. While food allergies can be expressed in the form of vomiting, itchiness, or diarrhea.If you do suspect any sort of allergies, mild or severe, it is usually a good idea to check in with your vet. They will be able to determine the nature of the reaction, as well as any potential treatment and how to avoid future reactions.

How to Reduce Allergies from Cats

So you have a cat that has stolen your heart, but you still sneeze at the sight of them, what can you do? Luckily, there are quite a few things allergy sufferers can look into to alleviate or even reduce their reactions or chance of a reaction.

Grooming – Brush that Derriere

If you have quite a negative effect coming from your kitty’s fur, regular brushing can help to reduce it. Because of their shedding, fine hairs, as well as clumps of hair, can be left all over the house, on every surface, or even float in the air.To reduce this hair apocalypse, you can brush Mittens often, minimizing loose and rogue hairs waiting to attack you. A good slicker brush is perfect for Ragdolls, as it reaches all the way through their long coats, ensuring you brush deeply and thoroughly.

Healthy Cat: Healthy Human

Generally speaking, if your cat has a healthy immune system, with zero to low irritants or issues, they will be scratching and shaking less. This, in turn, causes less of their hair and dander to end up in and around the house, making things better for your sinuses.

Changing up Your Home

While this may not be an option for everyone, if you can change some furniture in your house it can also help with allergies. Specifically, any fabrics (like couches, curtains, rugs) are allergen magnets.They collect a variety of potentially irritating substances, not limited to just cat hair and dander, but also dust and other particles. So you either have to clean them thoroughly on a regular basis, or perhaps look towards replacing them with alternatives (leather couches, etc.)

Vacuum – Pet Hair Nemesis

Cleaning your home is, of course, a top priority to minimize any potential allergens lurking about. Vacuuming your floors and rugs is a great place to start, as hair and dander can collect in these places. Specifically, those beautiful, long-haired carpets. These are literal ground zero for unpleasantries to collect and build up.The good news is that a pet vacuum is perfect for sorting out these allergen breeding grounds. Dustbusters and pet vacuums have special bristles and brushes to collect all the hidden pet hair your normal vac might miss. You will be shocked at the amount of hair and dirt still lurking in your carpets, trust us on this one: get a pet vacuum.

Purify That Air

Air purifiers can also be a tremendous help in removing allergens, especially those hanging around in the air. Try to get one with a HEPA filter, as they are excellent in collecting and capturing everything in the air.Not only will this improve your allergies immediately, but you can also notice a better, more efficient, sleeping cycle. Gone are the nights of coughing and sneezing for three hours before bed, pop an air filter and purifier into the bedroom and have a peaceful night’s sleep.

Laundry and Washing ‘Till the Cows Moo

As cats love rubbing themselves on absolutely everything, chances are your clothes are riddled with hair and dander. Doing your laundry regularly can eliminate this for the most part, as the washing cycle kills all allergens hiding in your clothes.A handy lint roller can also help remove any hair sticking to your clothes while washing your hands after interacting with puss can remove any irritants that might stick to them.

Bath Time!

As much as cats “love” water, it might be a good idea to get your fur child used to a regular bathing schedule. This helps to remove any dust and dirt from their coats (which can cause allergies of their own), as well as help remove dander and excess hair.Especially during shedding season, you should bathe them often (just not too much, as it can dry out their skin). Check-in with your vet on an appropriate bathing schedule for your Raggie. A nice, gentle pet shampoo will be perfect for your Ragdoll, to avoid drying out their skin too much.

Do Ragdolls Shed a Lot?

No. Ragdolls don’t have an undercoat therefore, they shed less than other cats. However, they do experience seasonal blowouts. Ragdolls change their coats twice every year (fall and spring) and there’s no escaping your exposure to cat hair.Ragdolls have small to medium hair length; therefore, when they do shed you will notice their fur all over your home.While regular brushing and grooming can help reduce this cat’s shedding level, it’s best if you wear gloves or have someone else who is not allergic handle this on your behalf.Shedding Levels: 6/1010Hair Length: 6/1010

Ragdoll Dander and Saliva Levels

Since allergies are determined by an individual’s sensitivity, you could be safe if you are not affected by the Fel D1 protein that cats produce. This protein is found in dander, saliva, urine and other substances that cats produce.Just like most other cat breeds, Ragdolls produce a substantial amount of these substances. If you’re prone to breathing allergies, dander and other allergens trapped in the cats fur will be released into the air when they shed.For skin sensitivities, your risk is coming into contact with saliva on the cats fur due to their self-grooming practices. Also, during shedding seasons, you’ll also have a carpet of hair, dander, saliva and other allergens that are released onto the surfaces of your home as your Ragdoll sheds.Saliva Exposure: 7/1010Dander Levels: 5/1010Like all felines, Ragdolls do produce the Fel D1 protein, which is known for causing allergies in human beings. Even though further research is needed, studies have confirmed that females and kittens produce less Fel d1. Neutered male Ragdolls are also known to produce less Fel D1.So if you absolutely love this breed and still want one anyway, aim to get one of the above options to help minimise your risk from the outset.

Grooming and Coat Maintenance

Ragdolls are generally clean cats that should not be washed regularly. Bathing them just once a month can help keep them smelling fresh and clean!Unlike all the longhaired cat breeds, the Ragdolls’ semi-long coat requires minimal grooming. Due to their unique coats, Ragdolls don’t matt as much as other cat breeds. Therefore, regular brushing of their coats can help keep the matts at bay.They’ll take care of the rest of their grooming needs.Maintenance: 4/1010Ease of Grooming: 8/1010Risk of Allergen Exposure: 8/1010

Fortify Your House

Ragdolls are affectionate creatures that love their entire human family. They don’t like to be left alone for a long time as they can get depressed and lonely. However, without proper training, these cats can drop allergens all over your home. So we recommend that you train them to: