Are Frogs Good Pets?

Frogs can make great pets for the right person, but frogs in the wild are facing population declines and extinction largely as a result of human activities. Unfortunately, the pet trade is likely contributing to the amphibian extinction crisis and the spread of a devastating infection by Chytrid fungus. For this reason, you should only buy frogs that you are sure are captive-bred locally and tested to be free of disease whenever possible. Avoid capturing wild frogs and keeping them as pets.

Sometimes their name adds to the confused expectations (e.g., “pixie” frogs, which sound like they should be small, are actually African bullfrogs , which grow to be eight to nine inches long and very fat). If you travel often and tend to leave town for more than a couple of days at a time, keep in mind that it can sometimes be difficult to find someone to care for your frogs.

Setting up a tank with everything your frog needs before bringing them home should be done to ensure a proper environment with appropriate water, humidity, and heat requirements. Many frogs have fairly simple light, temperature, and humidity requirements but they are very sensitive to contaminants and waste in their environment. Many frogs eat insects, including crickets, worms, caterpillars, moths, grasshoppers.

Oriental Fire-Bellied Toads : These are semi-terrestrial frogs that are fairly active and relatively easy to keep as pets.

Does a frog make a good pet?

Frogs make great pets, as long as some things are kept in mind. Frogs are relatively easy and inexpensive to keep, can be long lived, make great display animals, provide many educational opportunities for children, low maintenance, and definitely have that cool/exotic factor going for them!

Is it cruel to keep frogs as pets?

Is it Cruel to Keep Frogs as Pets? As a general rule, frogs should not be kept as pets because it is cruel to handle them without care, to not rigorously maintain their environmental conditions (humidity, heat), and to neglect to keep their tank and water supplies clean.

Are frogs a good beginner pet?

Frogs and Toads make great pets for anyone who wants a more challenging pet than a fish. Pet Frogs provide a great learning opportunity for first time keepers. These aquatic creatures are easy to care for, have vibrant colors and are usually cheaper than other pet reptiles.

Why frogs are not good pets?

3 Not-So-Good Things. Frogs can carry salmonella on their skin. … Keep cats, dogs, young children and the immune-compromised away from your frog. You have to handle insects to feed a pet frog. Some larger breeds also eat small mice.

Have you ever considered keeping a pet frog? You should! Frogs make great pets, as long as some things are kept in mind. Frogs are relatively easy and inexpensive to keep, can be long lived, make great display animals, provide many educational opportunities for children, low maintenance, and definitely have that cool/exotic factor going for them!

Its the lead up to Christmas and we have many customers getting in contact as they are planning to surprise their family with a new exotic pet. The most common question we hear around this time is which is the best pet for a beginner? so I thought it might be helpful to compile some blogs covering the top 5 lizards, invertebrates, frogs, geckos and snakes to showcase the ones we find to be the very best choices for a someone new to keeping exotic pets. Todays blog will cover the top 5 frogs.

Dart frogs thrive in a live enclosure with roots, plants and a small body of water making them a great choice when setting up a paludarium or bioactive terrarium.

On this page, Ill do my best to answer the question Do frogs make good pets. The short answer is yes but frogs arent for everyone. There are some important details you should consider before getting a frog. Ill go over the pros and cons on this page and by the end, I hope to send you on your way feeling confident whether or not frogs are a good choice for you.

Some species will tolerate occasional holding but, for the most part, frogs (and toads) should be left alone. Even for them, I dont necessarily recommend doing this because its stressful for the frog and chemicals on your hand could potentially harm your pet.

So, for those rare species of amphibians that tolerate the occasional handling, you need to clean your hands before picking them up. After giving it some thought, it occurred to me; some people like the sound of frogs croaking. Frogs typically croak during the spring time when its mating season.

Since frogs in captivity dont experience much change in temperate or weather, they might not make a sound. Perhaps the number one reason people keep frogs as pets is that theyre fun to watch. All thats required for most frogs is spot cleaning every other day, misting the enclosure, and feeding.

I probably spend less than 20 minutes a week providing upkeep for my tree frogs. Some circumstances might require changing the substrate in your frogs terrarium once every two or three months but that all depends on the setup. Misting systems, foggers, and lights can be set on timers and heaters can be attached to a thermostat.

Most plants require UVB light and a strict temperature range in order to grow. Fortunately, you can go with plant species that survive and thrive in the type of environment you pet frogs live in. Ill wrap things up by saying that frogs make great pets for certain people .

Once the initial setup is finished, feeding and spot cleaning their terrarium a few times a week is all thats required for most frogs. I truly hope this guide has helped you determine whether or not frogs are a good fit for you.

Caring for Pet Frogs

Frogs in captivity are quite long-lived (with proper care) so be prepared for a long term commitment. Average life spans are typically four to fifteen years, although some frogs have been known to live longer.Some of the smallest frogs you might see in a pet store grow into giants. Sometimes their name adds to the confused expectations (e.g., “pixie” frogs, which sound like they should be small, are actually African bullfrogs, which grow to be eight to nine inches long and very fat). They get their cute name from their Latin name,Some people might find pet frogs to be boring, but some of the smaller frogs are actually quite active. However, many of the larger frogs are sedentary and don’t move around much. Frogs are not a pet that should be handled regularly due to their special, sensitive skin.If you travel often and tend to leave town for more than a couple of days at a time, keep in mind that it can sometimes be difficult to find someone to care for your frogs.

Housing Frogs

Setting up a tank with everything your frog needs before bringing them home should be done to ensure a proper environment with appropriate water, humidity, and heat requirements. Some frogs hibernate and you will have to provide certain conditions to make sure your frog does so safely.Make sure you know the right kind of tank your frog will need (i.e. aquatic, terrestrial, arboreal, or semi-aquatic). A half land and half water environment is probably the trickiest to set up but is also one of the most common types of tank needed for frogs.Keeping a frog enclosure clean can be a lot of work. Many frogs have fairly simple light, temperature, and humidity requirements but they are very sensitive to contaminants and waste in their environment.

Food and Water

Your frog’s diet will vary based on its species, but generally speaking, frogs are carnivores who eat live prey. Many frogs eat insects, including crickets, worms, caterpillars, moths, grasshoppers. Some of the larger frogs will even eat pinky mice. You can purchase live prey at your local pet store.Be sure that fresh and clean water is available to your frog at all times.

Horned Frogs(

Also known as Pacman frogs these are a large ground-dwelling species that love to burrow into soil or moss. They are commonly sold in a variety of colour morphs like Albino, ‘Tri-color’ or ‘Fantasy’, aside from lighting for an albino the care is exactly the same across these variations. When fully grown this frog can grow to around 8 inches in length and are generally feisty but they can be held from behind once you get used to picking them up. This frog is in the top five because the set up required is extremely easy compared to other species and their diet isn’t very complicated. We have a setup list and care sheet available for this species on our website. To see what we have in stock please check our animal list for the Northampton and Towcester stores.

GrayTree Frogs (

Gray tree frogs are small tree-dwelling frogs commonly found in North America and Canada. They are the smallest arboreal frog in this list and probably the quickest too. They are a little difficult to catch and handling can be stressful for the frog so they aren’t the most interactive pet however, due to their size, they can be housed comfortably in a relatively small enclosure making them a great feature or decorative pet. The minimum size terrarium for 1 or 2 frogs is only around 30 x 30 x 45 cm, this coupled with the recent advances in bio-active enclosures means that you could have a fully living tropical enclosure in a glass terrarium anywhere in the house. We have a setup list and care sheet available for this species on our website. To see what we have in stock please check our animal list for the Northampton and Towcester stores.

Dart Frogs (

Dart frogs are a small terrestrial frog also commonly known as a poison arrow frog. There are many different species in a range of fantastic colours from bright gold to deep blue, green or even red. These little frogs will climb a little but need floor space more than they need height making them another great option for a compact enclosure. Dart frogs thrive in a live enclosure with roots, plants and a small body of water making them a great choice when setting up a paludarium or bioactive terrarium. We have 2 features including dart frogs in the Northampton store and both are gorgeous! We have a setup list and care sheet available for this species on our website. To see what we have in stock please check our animal list for the Northampton and Towcester stores.

Red eye tree frog (

Red eye tree frogs are the iconic tree frog. With bright green, yellow and blue bodies and vibrant red eyes these are spectacular pets. This species grows fairly large so we would have a 45x45x60 cm terrarium for 1-2 frogs. They need humidity, warmth and UVB and they can be quite sensitive but the reward is worth the work. Though they are slow through most of the day we see ours light up whenever it’s meal time or when they are sprayed. As with the other colourful frogs in this list, they look magnificent when paired with a live enclosure and jungle plants. They are one of the most asked for pet frogs in the store and as long as you have the set up perfect from day one there is no reason they would not make a great pet frog for beginners. We have a setup list and care sheet available for this species on our website. To see what we have in stock please check our animal list for the Northampton and Towcester stores.

They’re (mostly) not for handling…

I briefly mentioned this in the opening paragraphs but frogs shouldn’t be held very often (or at all). There are a few of species that will tolerate occasional handling. Even for them, I don’t necessarily recommend doing this because its stressful for the frog and chemicals on your hand could potentially harm your pet.Amphibians have semi-permeable skin which allows chemicals to pass through. Whatever is on your hands can end up in your pet. So, for those rare species of amphibians that tolerate the occasional handling, you need to clean your hands before picking them up. Or wear a pair of non-powered vinyl gloves.

Reasons frogs make great pets

Now let’s talk about the reasons frogs make great pets. For most, it’s just an enjoyable hobby – regardless of the fact that you can’t hold your beloved amphibians very often.

Fun to observe an exotic species

Perhaps the number one reason people keep frogs as pets is that they’re fun to watch. Especially brightly colored species like poison-dart frogs, red-eyed tree frogs, andUnfortunately, not all frogs can your pet! Endangered species can’t be kept. Despite that, there are plenty of cool frogs to choose from.

Easy upkeep

Aside from the initial setup, upkeep is simple and easy. All that’s required for most frogs is spot cleaning every other day, misting the enclosure, and feeding. I probably spend less than 20 minutes a week providing upkeep for my tree frogs.Some circumstances might require changing the substrate in your frog’s terrarium once every two or three months but that all depends on the setup.Vivarium setups (mini bioactive enclosures) are mostly self-sustaining. Not only that but you can automate misting systems, foggers, and heaters. Misting systems, foggers, and lights can be set on timers and heaters can be attached to a thermostat.It all depends on what you want to do with your setup and more importantly, what the requirements are for the type of frog you want. Do your research first and plan accordingly!

Frogs + Plants = Pretty Neat

Watching exotic frogs is fun but tropical plants are cool too. They’re a great combination in my opinion. Search for some nice looking, exotic plants that don’t pose a threat to your frog and plant them in your terrarium; I think you’ll find that tropic plants are almost as fun to watch as exotic amphibians.You’ll need a few things to make this work, however. Most plants require UVB light and a strict temperature range in order to grow. Fortunately, you can go with plant species that survive and thrive in the type of environment you pet frogs live in.

Conclusion

I’ll wrap things up by saying thatThey eat a variety of foods but live crickets are generally preferred. Crickets are cheap and widely available in pet stores. Also, crickets are fairly easy to raise if you decide.Frogs aren’t for everyone, though. If you want something to handle frequently, I don’t recommend getting an amphibian. Also, some frogs can be loud at night and that be a downside for certain people.I truly hope this guide has helped you determine whether or not frogs are a good fit for you. This was a short, simple guide and I didn’t cover everything. Please use the comment section below if you have any questions concerning keeping frogs as pets.
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