Are Chinchillas Good Pets?

Each year we try to outdo the last one. We think of the best gift we can give, something thats special, something that will create a moment that will be remembered forever – especially when it comes to our kids. Oftentimes, this leads to the conclusion that a one-of-a-kind gift would be a pet. Maybe a cat or a dog isnt right, but something more exotic? A pet chinchilla?

The initial cost for this exotic animal is relatively high, and on top of that they require a certain kind of cage and food that tend to add up. Not only does this mean that they wake up at night and make noise while youre trying to sleep, but during the hours that you or your children would potentially play with them, they may not be interested.

If you arent able to spend time with your chinchilla daily, this may lead to mental and physical health issues.

Do chinchillas cuddle with you?

They tend to be affectionate, curious and social animals that can bond closely with their owners and generally like to be held close and cuddled. Certain features of chinchillas make them unique, and anyone considering a pet chinchilla should know these 10 fascinating chinchilla facts.

Why chinchillas are bad pets?

Chinchillas have their own personalities, like most pets. … Chinchillas also have sharp teeth, which they will use if they feel threatened, and this can be very unsafe around children. Chinchillas require a consistent temperature of around 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

Is a chinchilla a difficult pet?

Thinking of getting your first chinchilla? Chinchillas make great pets but can also be more difficult to take care of compared to other small animals. … Chinchillas are great if you have a busy schedule. They don’t require much one-on-one time and prefer to be left in their cage.

Are chinchilla easy pets?

Chinchilla’s are relatively easy pets to take care of and shouldn’t be too hard for most people. This is why they also make for a great first pet! … Much like rabbits, that is the staple food of the Chinchilla diet. You can (and should) also give your Chinchilla specially-formulated pellets.

Chinchillas are small rodents native to South America found in rocky, arid areas in the mountains. They are active and playful and, with gentle handling from a young age, most chinchillas become quite tame and can bond closely with their owners. But don’t expect them to like being held and cuddled like dogs and cats. They usually don’t, although they’ll express their affection for you in other ways.

The minimum floor space is about 24 by 24 inches, and a tall cage is best; if possible, get one with shelves and ladders that allow this mountain native to climb. Wire floors or shelves can be covered with wood to give the chinchilla’s feet a break.

Chinchillas are, in fact, prone to picking out and eating just what they like from a mix, making it less nutritionally balanced. Furry chinchillas, who hail from arid climes, need regular access to a dust bath . Blocks of wood and tree branches that are free of pesticides make good chew toys.

They may develop respiratory or digestive problems with symptoms such as discharge from eyes and nose or diarrhea. Be sure the chinchilla you’re considering is active and bright-eyed, with a good appetite, plenty of energy, and a shiny coat.

Despite these preferences, most people desire something fluffy like a cat that has a fantastic personality. Chinchillas, although a little bit of an exotic pet, satisfy all these criteria. The question is, though, are Chinchillas good pets?

They are more active during the night than the day, but the time when you’ll find them up and moving about the most are those early morning and late-night hours. Unfortunately, they’re prone to overheating, especially if you put their cage in the direct sunlight or on the upper floors, which tend to be warmer.

You’ll wish to have shelves, ladders, and other fun, entertaining things in the cage so that way your furry friend doesn’t become bored. There are so many animals in this world that would enjoy a loving home, and adopting your chinchilla will help give that pet a new life! The hounds sense of smell and tracking abilities make it seem as though it was created specifically for the purpose of hunting…

They can be incredibly creative like Apollo or Harry Puffer, or as simple as typical human names like George or Kevin. Here, you will find a unique and expansiv…

This is a great question to ask yourself before making the decision to purchase a chinchilla. To answer this we have to look at what youre looking for in a pet. Chinchillas can be very independent. Most of them do not want cuddle and prefer to stay in their cages. They rely on you to keep their hay rack, food dish, and water bottle full. Their cage should be kept clean and their stress kept to a minimum. You dont even need to give them a bath! Chinchillas take dust baths a few times a week. You place the bath inside their cage and remove it 15-30 minutes later. Apart from these basic needs, they dont require much attention.

This is a long commitment and you shouldnt get a chinchilla if you dont intend to care for it for their entire life. Although children (even teenagers) may want them now, theyll likely change their mind as they get older and go on to high school or move away from home.

If you decide to have play time, it should be kept to a minimal, 100% supervised, and in an enclosed space. One thing to remember is that popular pet stores typically dont have the right information.

Housing

Chinchillas are perhaps best known for their incredibly soft, thick, luxurious fur. In the wild, this fur protects them from the elements, but in captivity, it makes them somewhat susceptible to overheating. This must be considered when deciding where to place your chinchilla in the house. A cooler, quiet area of your home is the best place to put a cage for your chinchilla. Summertime temperatures must be monitored to make sure the ambient temperature is not much more than 77 degrees Fahrenheit (25 degrees Celsius).Chinchilla cages must be large, multilevel homes with platforms, ramps, and perches. The larger the cage, the better. The minimum floor space is about 24 by 24 inches, and a tall cage is best; if possible, get one with shelves and ladders that allow this mountain native to climb. A wire is the best cage material; avoid plastic cages or accessories because chinchillas chew and destroy plastic readily. The tray can be lined with wood shavings, preferably pine; avoid cedar and hardwood shavings, such as aspen, and newspapers. Many chinchilla cages have a wire floor, which is nice for cleanliness, but the wire can be hard on chinchilla feet so it’s best avoided. Wire floors or shelves can be covered with wood to give the chinchilla’s feet a break. A nest box, made of wood, should also be provided.

Food and Water

Chinchillas have specific dietary requirements that are different from those of other rodents. They must be fed a high-quality, chinchilla-specific food or their health will suffer. Chinchillas require a lot of roughage, and the diet should mainly consist of good-quality grass hay along with pellets made for chinchillas. Treats should be offered in moderation (no more than 1 teaspoon per day). The digestive system of chinchillas is fairly sensitive so any diet changes should be gradual.Pelleted diets are better than a mixture of loose items. Commercially available loose mixes with chinchilla pellets, seeds, corn, and other food may be nutritionally balanced while they are in the bag, but your chinchilla may not eat all of the parts of the mix. Chinchillas are, in fact, prone to picking out and eating just what they like from a mix, making it less nutritionally balanced. Look for a pelleted diet, formulated specifically for chinchillas that are 16 to 20 percent protein, low in fat (2 to 5 percent), and high in fiber (15 to 35 percent).

Dust Baths

Furry chinchillas, who hail from arid climes, need regular access to a dust bath. Keep in mind that It takes regular dust baths to keep your chinchilla’s soft, thick fur in good condition. Chinchillas should never be bathed in water. The fine chinchilla dust provided for a dust bath penetrates the thickness of the chinchilla’s fur, where it absorbs oils and clears away dirt. Not only do dust baths keep the fur of chinchillas in tip-top shape, but they also really seem to enjoy having a vigorous dust bath.

Best Toys

Chinchillas like to chew, run and jump, and hideout. This means you need a variety of toys for chinchillas to keep them busy and active, especially items for chewing to keep the incisor teeth in good condition. Blocks of wood and tree branches that are free of pesticides make good chew toys. Some wooden parrot toys are also good toys for them, as are the willow balls and rings that you can find for rabbits. It’s important to provide toys that do not have small or plastic parts that could be ingested. In addition, a “chinchilla block” or pumice block can be provided for chewing, and this will aid in keeping the teeth trim.Wheels can provide excellent exercise, although you may find that unless the chinchilla is introduced to the idea at a fairly young age it may not take to running on a wheel. Look for a 15-inch wheel (anything smaller will be too small for most adult chinchillas), with a solid running surface and an open side with no cross supports as there are in wire wheels, which can be dangerous to feet and tails. The risks of overheating make the use of plastic run-about balls undesirable; your chinchilla would much rather run around in a secure, chinchilla-proofed room with no exposed electrical wire or plastic to chew on.

Common Health Problems

Chinchillas are subject to the same health problems as other small mammals. They may develop respiratory or digestive problems with symptoms such as discharge from eyes and nose or diarrhea. Sick chinchillas may also lose weight, hunch their bodies, stop caring for their coats, have difficulty breathing or stop eating.In addition to infectious diseases, chinchillas can be injured. Sores or broken nails can cause problems with walking or running. Chinchillas‘ teeth grow quickly, and overgrown teeth can become a problem.If your chinchilla is showing signs of illness, bring it to an exotic vet. Meanwhile, however, avoid handling your chinchilla too much as handling can be stressful.

Is Chinchilla Pet Care Easy?

Chinchilla’s are relatively easy pets to take care of and shouldn’t be too hard for most people. This is why they also make for a great first pet! There are a few things, however, that you need to know.First, chinchillas are crepuscular. That word means that they are most active during dusk and dawn. They are more active during the night than the day, but the time when you’ll find them up and moving about the most are those early morning and late-night hours.Second, Chinchilla pet care involves a standard diet of roughage. You’ll want to feed your pet lots of grass hay. Much like rabbits, that is the staple food of the Chinchilla diet. You can (and should) also give your Chinchilla specially-formulated pellets. These pellets will provide nutrition that the hay doesn’t have.Finally, Chinchillas require a cage in a cool, quiet part of the house. These furry little creatures come from colder parts of South America. That fur serves them well over there, but it often doesn’t help them well in domestic environments. Unfortunately, they’re prone to overheating, especially if you put their cage in the direct sunlight or on the upper floors, which tend to be warmer. So, pick a part of the house that won’t get too hot and use that for the cage.

What Living Conditions Do Chinchillas Need?

Chinchillas need space. They are very active creatures that need room to run and play. As such, you’ll want a giant cage. Most places suggest that the minimum cage size is 24 inches by 24 inches (four square feet). However, you’ll probably want more than that. If you can do 9-10 square feet, that would be quite a bit better.You’ll also want a tall cage. Cages that have room in which to climb are the best. You’ll wish to have shelves, ladders, and other fun, entertaining things in the cage so that way your furry friend doesn’t become bored.Use wood shavings to line the bottom of the cage. These shavings will provide some cushion for your chinchilla’s feet and will protect their feet from getting caught on the metal.With this in mind, make sure that you check the cage thoroughly for any places where your chinchilla might escape. Hamsters, for example, are notorious for having accidents trying to escape their enclosures. Ensure that your cage doesn’t have any places through which your chinchilla might try and slip through!

What Is the Chinchilla Pet Cost?

The cost of Chinchillas varies depending on where you live and how you get your new pet. However, most people find the price to be somewhere around $130-$350.If you adopt a chinchilla or get one from a friend for free, you’ll pay less. If you get one from a company, you might pay a little more. If possible, rescue adoption is always preferable to buying one from a pet store. There are so many animals in this world that would enjoy a loving home, and adopting your chinchilla will help give that pet a new life!

Are Chinchillas Good Pets?

The answer to that is yes! They are relatively inexpensive (while $100-$300 may not be cheap, it’s also not the thousands that a purebred dog can cost!). The food they consume doesn’t cost too much and, in general, they’re very healthy animals. They’ll need regular checkups, but there won’t be anything too strenuous. And, chinchillas have a lovable personality. They’re playful, active, and love their owners.Unless you have small children who may have issues with chinchillas, overall, they are fantastic pets to have! Most people who have one highly recommend them!

Can you have chinchillas as a pet?

Yes, you can. Unless your apartment complex, condo HOA, or a city ordinance says that you cannot have one in your home, chinchillas are available everywhere.

How long do chinchillas live as pets?

In general, chinchillas live for around 15 years. However, that time varies quite a bit. They live much less in the wild because they have predators and other ailments that they won’t encounter at your home. Sometimes, chinchillas in captivity can live for 20 years. The oldest living chinchilla ever was born in Germany but died in California. He was born on February 1, 1985, and died on September 18, 2014, making him a whopping 29 years 229 days old. Your chinchilla probably won’t live that long, though. Expect it to have roughly a 15-20 year lifespan, much like a cat!