Ameraucana Chicken Egg Color?

What is the difference between an Araucana and Ameraucana chicken? If youre confused, youre not alone. Even the experts disagree on some aspects of the histories of these breeds. I hope the following clears up a few of the basics.

Other traits include a pea comb, white skin, full tails, muffs and beards (always together), and slate or black legs; they have no ear tufts. The misleading spelling is usually intended to imply that that Easter Eggers are Ameraucanas, which is wrong on many levels .

Traits include pea combs and wattles that are either small or absent, usually possess greenish legs and beards with muffs. EEs are found in an infinite array of feather colors, which makes them a beautiful and unique hybrid chicken. In the format of essay all eggs are related to the hybrids of the chicken, but is it real we dont know.

What color of eggs do Ameraucana chickens lay?

The Ameraucana breed was derived from blue egg-laying chickens, but they do not have the breeding problems inherent to Araucanas. In addition, rather than ear tufts, they have muffs and a beard, and are very hardy and sweet. They lay eggs in shades of blue, and even have blue (or “slate”) legs.

Can Ameraucanas lay pink eggs?

I was recently looking around at this years availability of Ameraucana\’s (eggs and birds). I came across a distributor called QC supply (www.QCSupply.com) and they advertise Ameraucana (spelled correctly) chicks. They say Ameraucana\’s also go by the name easter eggs chickens and some of these birds can lay pink eggs.

Are Ameraucana eggs always blue?

While the Standard says that Ameraucanas are to lay blue eggs, there are a lot of interpretations and shades of blue; ranging from a deep blue to a very pale blue, and even to greenish blue. I’ve had birds here that have laid very pale eggs, and some that have laid a greener egg.

How can you tell the difference between Ameraucana and Easter Eggers?

Leg color is the color of the legs, while feet color is the color of the bottom of the feet. Ameraucanas have pink feet. If your Ameraucana has yellow feet, or some other color it is an Easter Egger. Skin color is the same color as the feet, the feet is just the easiest way to see it.

And ever since Martha Stewart appeared on television years ago holding a basket of blue eggs laid by her chickens, the demand for the blue egg laying breeds has skyrocketed.

There are predominantly three breeds of chickens that lay blue eggs | the Ameraucana, the Araucanaand the Easter Egger. There are several other not-so-common breeds that also lay blue eggs including the Cream Legbar which are just becoming available in the US and the mixed breed Ice Cream Bar – half Swedish Isbar half Cream Legbar – which also lay blue eggs.

But for the purpose of this article, I’m going to be talking about the three most common breeds of chickens that lay blue eggs. Here are the basic differences between the three predominant blue egg laying breeds of chickens: Ameraucanas are a pure breed that has been recognized by the APA (American Poultry Association) since 1984.

They were most likely originally bred from South American blue egg laying breeds but were developed and standardized in the United States. The Araucana originated in Chile most likely and come in five colors including black, white, duckwing silver and golden. Ear tufts (this gene is lethal to developing chicks if inherited by both parents)

They are technically mutts – mixed breed chickens that do possess the blue egg gene, but don’t fully meet the breed specifications of either Araucanas or Ameraucanas. But ultimately if you want blue eggs, you’ll need to choose either Ameraucana or Araucana chickens, or one of the newer breeds including Cream Legbar or Ice Cream Bar. If you run across a feed store or hatchery selling Americanas, they are likely Easter Eggers.

The coloring of the Ameraucana is quite variable, with several color palettes to choose from anywhere from black to white, blue to wheaten. The variety of colors available makes this a beautiful bird.

With the eyes being bay red, they can look a bit fierce, but they are quite a docile bird. In reading reviews for the temperament of this bird, I noticed a wide variety of behaviors.

It is generally a friendly bird but doesnt necessarily enjoy being picked up and cuddled. It also enjoys human contact and interactions; most folks say it is a brilliant and predator-savvy bird. It can be difficult to differentiate between the muffs and beard, but it should be clearer to see close inspection.

Depending on the color of the plumage, the legs and feet should be slate blue to black. In past times blue eggs have been promoted as having less cholesterol and more protein. The Ameraucana does not have any significant health issues, unlike its parent, the Araucana.

The recent history behind this breed extends back into the 1920s and to South America Chile, to be specific. The two breeds were bred together either naturally or by human intervention no one knows and from this union came the Araucana. The genetic makeup is such that it carries a lethal gene that can kill chicks in the shell.

The lethal gene gives the Araucana its unique tufted ears. If both parents contribute a tufting gene (ET) the chicks will die in the shell. The Araucana was brought to the US in limited quantities in the 1920s following the birds presentation by Professor Salvador Castillo at a conference in Santiago, Chile.

One of the folks instrumental in raising Araucanas and eventually creating the Ameraucana was Mr. Keller of the Pratt Experimental Farm in Pennsylvania. Some with ear tufts, some with muffs and beards, some rumpless, some with full tails, etc. Interestingly, in the UK, Australia, and many other countries, Araucanas and Ameraucanas are accepted as the same breed, whether they are rumpless or tailed.

A huge plus for many folks is that they lay a moderate to a good amount of light blue eggs. Most roosters can get a bit cranky at times, but they are not overly aggressive that I have found during research. Others have reported that their Ameraucanas struggle to handle highly humid and hot environments.

In some of the hatchery catalogs, a telltale sign is if the birds are advertised as recommended for laying or not for exhibition or 4H use. The Easter Egger is a hybrid of either the Ameraucana or the Araucana and another breed of chicken. Like the Araucana and Ameraucana, the Easter Egger may also lay blue eggs, have muffs, or even beards.

What Kinds of Chickens Lay Blue Eggs?

Most chicken breeds lay brown or white eggs, but there are several kinds of chickens that lay blue eggs.And ever since Martha Stewart appeared on television years ago holding a basket of blue eggs laid by her chickens, the demand for the blue egg laying breeds has skyrocketed.

Ameraucana Appearance and Temperament

The coloring of the Ameraucana is quite variable, with several color palettes to choose from – anywhere from black to white, blue to wheaten. The variety of colors available makes this a beautiful bird.It is considered a winter hardy, dual-purpose breed.The beard and muffs give the bird a somewhat ‘chipmunk face,’ looking like their cheeks are puffed out!With the eyes being bay red, they can look a bit fierce, but they are quite a docile bird. The look is deceiving.In reading reviews for the temperament of this bird, I noticed a wide variety of behaviors.Whether or not this reflects upbringing or other circumstances is hard to determine. Its temperament has been noted as anywhere from skittish to docile and gentle.It is generally a friendly bird but doesn’t necessarily enjoy being picked up and cuddled.The Ameraucana is usually sociable with its’ own kind and usually sits in the middle of the pecking order.It also enjoys human contact and interactions; most folks say it is a brilliant and predator-savvy bird.The Ameraucana is said to have a hawk-like appearance, and some enthusiasts appreciate this quality for free-range flocks.It is thought that mimicry deters attacks from actual hawks or other animals. The laser-focus of their bay red eyes only adds to this theory.

Egg Laying and Broodiness

The Ameraucana was accepted to theThe Ameraucana has a red pea comb, as are the wattles. Wattles are on the small side or can be non-existent.Eyes are a reddish bay color.Ameraucanas have both beards and muffs. It can be difficult to differentiate between the muffs and beard, but it should be clearer to see close inspection.The tail should be carried upright almost at 45 degrees to the body.Depending on the color of the plumage, the legs and feet should be slate blue to black.There should be four toes on each foot, and the shanks should be clean of feathering. The skin on the bottom of the foot is white, as is the skin of the bird.There are eight recognized colors for the Ameraucana:The Ameraucana is considered a light fowl, and weights should be around 6.5lb for males and 5.5lb.Bantams should weigh in at 26-30oz. For males and 24-26oz. For females.

Background and History of the Ameraucana

The recent history behind this breed extends back into the 1920s’ and to South America – Chile, to be specific.The Mapuche Indians originally had two types of chickens – the Collonca and Quintero.These breeds were ancient even to the Indians and were first noted and written about by the Spanish invaders in the 1500s.The two breeds were bred together either naturally or by human intervention – no one knows – and from this union came the Araucana.The Araucana is a parent bird of the Ameraucana chicken.The Araucana chicken was (and is) a scarce bird. The genetic makeup is such that it carries a lethal gene that can kill chicks in the shell.The lethal gene gives the Araucana its’ unique tufted ears. If both parents contribute a tufting gene (ET) – the chicks will die in the shell.Ameraucanas were bred to retain the blue egg gene but eliminate the lethal gene of their parents.The Araucana was brought to the US in limited quantities in the 1920s following the bird’s presentation by Professor Salvador Castillo at a conference in Santiago, Chile.One of the folks instrumental in raising Araucanas and eventually ‘creating’ the Ameraucana was Mr. Keller of the Pratt Experimental Farm in Pennsylvania.He cross-bred the Araucanas with other birds resulting in a mélange of different birds.Some with ear tufts, some with muffs and beards, some rumpless, some with full tails, etc. – all were called Araucanas.Interestingly, in the UK, Australia, and many other countries, Araucanas and Ameraucanas are accepted as the same breed, whether they are rumpless or tailed.